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Sandusky Star Journal: Monday, September 25, 1911 - Page 1

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - September 25, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               TODAY'S NEWS TODAY THE HOME PAPER THE SAN DUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SEPTEMBER UST EDITION NUMBER 310 KILLED WHEN WARSHIP BLEW UP Fire Followed By Explosion on Board French Cruiser Liberte Wrecks and Sinks Similar to Blow- ing up of Maine. Sept. least 310 officers and men of the cruiser Liberte died today when the warship blew up and sank in the road- etead off this place. One hundred of the crew escaped by swimming ashore. A short circuit in the store room is supposed to have caused the disaster but as the cause js not positively known the wildest excitement prevails. The disaster hears a striking resemblance to the destruction of the 'American battleship Maine. Captain Jaures was absent from the ship at the time of the explosion. The explosion occurred before the vessel Bank. The explosion was so terriflc that 20 seamen on the battleship Demu- anchored near the were killed. Windows were shatter- ed all over Toulon. It was officially stated this after- noon that the list of casualties num- bers 310. The Liberte's total crew numbered 710 of whom 120 were on shore leave. At roll call on the flagship of whom 40 were serious- ly responded. The fire broke out at 5 o'clock. It was not believed to be serious but suddenly spread. Most of the men were asleep below decks and were killed in their berths. A of explosions came at minute and when life boats from other ves- sels reached the scene 100 blackened bodies floated in the debris Ves- sels nearby were damaged by flying- metal from the Liberte. The Liberte was torn in two and the forward part rests on the bottom Reports Are Current That Ital- ian Forces Have Already Landed in Three Places. TURKS IN DEFIANT MOOD Will Resent'Invasion With Arrrls if Necessary and Banish Sept. first army corps is being mobilized for embarkation for Tripoli today In readiness to oppose the Italian seizure of the colony. Thirty thousand troops are already in Tripoli. Troops are Landed. Sept uncon- firmed rumor has been received here in a dispatch to the Temps that the Italians have landed troops at three points in Tripoli. The Turkish charge de affairs in this city made a statement in a de- fiant note in which he said that Turk- ish people would resent any interfer- ence of the Italian nation in the af- fairs of Tripoli and would immediate- ly banisji all Italian subjects. He also Bftid that the landing of troops would be resented with armedi forces. A dispatch from Port Said says that the Turks have captured the Italian iiner Eegina Margherita at a steamer of the ffoet of the Navigaz- ione Generals of Genoa. Are Moving Rapidly. Sept. Italian gov- ernment is moving rapidly-and with determination in the matter of an Italian protectorate over Tripoli. Its plans are no longer concealed and its Bttitude is by classes ex- cept the advanced section of the so- who threaten a general strike in the' event of hostilities. Although not attaching much im- portance to this the govern- which is acting witfi the great- est prudence in every has de- cided1 to call to the colors re- so as to be prepared for all emergencies both at- home and abroad.--------------------------------------- BIG NAVlAiL DISASTERS. __ French battleship Liberte blown up and sunk at Septem- her at a time wjSen war excitement 310 killed. United States battleship Maine blown up and sunk at February and 353 killed. Spanish-American war resulted. French battleship Jena blown up at Toulon March 80 j 150 wounded. Japanese battleship Mikasa blown UD in Masebo over 200 killed. German torpedo boat S-126 blown up November 33 kilted. 'British battleship yictoria sunk in Mediterranean in collision with Battleship 300 killed. upside down The warships Demo- Verite and Republique were badly damaged by flying metal. The death list will be inci eased by 100 by casualties on these ships A gigantic block of steel structure from the Liberte was blown across the water striking a launch in which a number of the crew were going ashore. The launch all hands on board being killed. The excitement was intense. Just before the first explosion alarm that the fire was dangerous had spread through the fleet and to the naval officers on shore. Big tug boats equipped with fire fighting ap- paratus started for the secne. When the explosion let go hundreds ot others boats were shaken. The crew sought to prevent the spread or flames to the last. Other ships in the squadron sent relief and many of According to the information in of- ficial circles the government still hopes to effect an amicable arrange- ment with whereby Italy will secure a lease of Tripoli under the Bovereignlty of paying there- for an annual rental. If Turkey defin- itely refuses to meet this Italy has planned military measures. Interest in London. Sept. from Italy and Turkey the gravest concern in all capitals of Eu- rope. The attempt of Italy to seize Tripoli is resented'here England's position will he The move against Tripoli is popular in Italy as the poorer classes seek a place or disposing of their labor. their crews were injured in the res- cue work. The warship Republique was so badly damaged by the explosion that she had to be drydocked. The minister of marine and his cabi- net in Paris took immediate steps to aid the families of the victims ef the disaster today and to determine the responsibility. Rejoicing over the settlement of the Moroccan contro- versy has turned to mourning and a concerted demand for a thorough' In- vestigation. Seen at New York. NEW Sept. ill fat- ed warship Liberte was one of the three French ships anchored in the North River during the Hudson-Ful- ton celebration here. She cost and carried ten 14-inch guns in each turret. The big ship was 439 feet long. Only six battleships in the French navy surpass her in strength. People Doubtful in Russia Aft- er Report Is Sent Out By Governor General. Sept. was announced by the governor general to- that Demintri Bogroff. assassin of Premier Stolypin. was hanged shortly before noon The hanging was wit- nessed- only by officials. In some quarters doubt is expressed as to Bogroff's actually being put to death owing to the powetrful interests back him. IGLE'SffillS Special to the Star-Journal. Sept. cir- cuit court today set nes-t Thursday as I the date for the final hearing of argu- rrents in the appeal of the case of j Rodney J. Diegle. senate sergeant-at- convicted in the bribery cases. Prosecuting Attorney Turner wanted it heard Friday and for the sought a later date. The action taken means a speedy dis- position of the case. TAFT TALKS TO LADIES' LITERARY CLUB I WITH NEVER A WORD ONJEQUAJLSUFFRACE DIES OF RABIES. Sept. died today. Since being taken to the countj hospital great doses of morphine have administered and he lernained un- conscious to the end. Young Barnes was hopelessly afflicted with hyprophobia and1 the icians decided not to permit him to suffer. GRAND Sept. 25 A year or so ago the Ladies' Literarj club of Grand Rapids was honored by a visit from Col. Theodore who talked to them of many one of which was equal suffrage. later in the Governor Chase Osborne of Michigan gave the ladies a lecture and made his public declaration in favor of votes for wom- en. What more natrual than that the when their Mrs. Will liam F. went to Washing- ton last spring and obtained from President Taft a promise to speak be- the should rather look for- Driver Was Unable to See Ap- proaching Train Because of High Billboard. NOW FEAR THREE MEN WERE SLAIN RODCERS GOING WELL IN AIR RACE WAGON WAS CAUGHT IN MIDDLE OF TRACK Bodies of Victims Were Strewn Along for 800 Feet With Six on Engine THE DEAD. waid. to another verbal wallop at Cubby's vcjttag intelligence aad soft words of praise foi own. Taft came along on bis campaign tour. tHe spent a half day only Grand but he found time to call at Mrs. where he found the ladies and gave them the promised speech. They were just a mite forj lie president was so chuck full of reciprocity ideas that he just couldn't talk about anything else. The picture shows the chief execu- tive taking his departure from the McKnight home and Mrs. McKnight standing beside him. John Drill. James XJheslock. Gustav Finn. Mabel Finn. John Hart. Steven Lasek. Dominick Omnichtnsli. Mabel Renz. _John Schedick. Joseph Schedick. Joseph Sienyo Frank Sisgardt. Isabelle Suchowski. JUDGE BLAIR FOUND ONE ADAMS WEST Sept. A. Z. Blair today took the bench in the common pleas court. There is but one case that being against Charles who pleaded not guil- ty to vote selling. Reports to the election commissioners show candi- dates for office in Adams county at the recent did not spend a cent. This is the first session of the court in Adams county since the famous session of last spring when Judge of disfranchised and fined or more of the voters of Adams county following the ex- posure of vote buying dur- ing the fall election of last at which time a democratic member of the legislature was elected for the first time in many years. The announcement that none of tb.6 candidates at the recfent primaries spent any money was not surprising as it was certain that any expenditure of money would be looked into and probed thoroughly by the grand jury in case there were any illegal expend- itures. This is made necessary under the Kimball corrupt practice law which was drawn by Representative B. F. of Adams following the effort which was made to rid this county of the corrupt practice of buy- ing and selling votes which was a common practice among the residents i i of the kill districts. The fact that Judge Blair d'isfran- chised so many voters made the pri- j mary vote exceedingly light all the county. The trial of Clark be watched with interest as many of i the residents of the county at first pleaded not guilty when arraigned. Si Hoskins sez the j reason most men I spend their spare i time behind a glass is becuz their wives I spend all of in front of one.------r Sept. merrily on their way home from a wedding anniversary celebiation a party of young people came to grief at the Commercial street crossing of the Chicago and Northwestern rail- way when a train struck the hay rack on which they were killing thirteen and seriously injuring eight others. A large billboard at the side of the track pi evented the wagon being seen or the persons on It seeing the train. It -was in the morning when the accident occurred. The party composed of residents of with two who were from legless and bodies covered the right-of-way as the nine coaches in was brought to a stop 800 feet from the scene of the crrsh. Several of the bodies were so badly mutilated that identification was possible only by fragments of clothing. Six bodies were discovered piled on the engine pilot and two other bodies were hurled through a flagman's shanty with such force as to overturn the structure. One of these was Miss who was projected through one of the side walls of the house and was breathing when removed. She died a few hours later. Another of the victims was thrown high over a barn fifty feet from the tracks. Among the occupants of the hay- rack who escapecTwere Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brisinski and child of 2. They were seated in the front half of the the mother holding the child in her lap. About half way back in the wagon sat Mary Unset- tled with probably showers tonight or cooler Tuesday. Temperature at 7 a. one year 60. Sun rises Tuesday at a in. and sets at p. m. Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon eleven miles west at Sunday afternoon. j latter was hui led about fifty feet and unconscious. When found rescuers the Brisinski child was in her mother's having escaped i unscathed. The parents of the child I were only slightly injured. Peter driver and owner of horses attached to the ill fated managed to hang to the reins and was the only person aboard who was at least ternpoianly stunned by 1 the collision. He declared he did not Now thai Ward has re- tired from the coast-to-coast aeroplane Aviator fly- ing from the and Aviator Fow- who started from San are the only two contestants who are making pi ogress. Rodgeis has had considerable hard luck with engine trouble and losing his but is now eating up distance splendidly. Two More Kelleys Island For- eigners Missing But May Have Run Away. FIVE LIVED IN SHACK ON THE NORTH SHORE Two Left Island Friday and Body of Fifth Found on Judges of U. S. Circuit Court and Tobacco Trust Repre- sentatives With Him. STANLEY TO PROBE STEEL Says Special Committee of Congress Was Appointed to Get Trust NEW Sept. General Wiekersham arrived here to- day and went into conference with the judges of the United States circuit court and representatives of the to- bacco trust regarding the reorganiza- tion of company. Wiekersham declined to discuss the trust question. He admitted he intended making a statement regarding his plans for Were three men murdered at Kelleys Island one night early last instead of only as the finding of the body of Antonio Hungarian late Saturday afternoon Residents of Kelleys Island and county authorities now investigat- ing the ease are compelled to give serious consideration to the theory that there may have been three foreigners who met death by in view of tie facts which have come to light. The triple murder was scouted by Coroner Knoble Mon- day afternoon. He said that he was sure that the murder had been com- mitted Tuesday and that all four of Vicarto's roommates were seen on the island the next morning. Two of the men at that when asked where their companion said he was sick. Coroner- Kno- ble said that so it had been to- possible to get toe-foreisnej-s on the island to talk about the case to the authorities. A report was circulated Monday afternoon that some of the men who roomed with Vicario had written letters to friends but this was not verified. Five foreigners occupied a camp house on the north side of the island. After three of them were never seen alive again. Two of the five reported for work at the quarries Wednesday morning. Friday they drew their pay at the Kelley Is- land Lime Transport Co.'s offices and quit They packed their belong- ings and boarded the steamer Prank E. bound lor Sandusky. Saturday the nude body of Vicario floatuig-on. the north shore of the island. There was every evidence that met his death hy violence. It was then that the quarry officials and islanders saw reason for the Tuirried departure Vicario's two companions. At the same lime the question as to what had been the fate of the two remain- ing men of the camp was raised. They have not been SCPU dead or alive since Wednesday. No small boats are missing at the island. Crews of steamers touching Kelleys island know of no foreigners leavinf during the past week except the two men who got away Friday. It is this unexplained disap- pearance of the two men which gives rise to thes suspicion that three instead of met with foul play. Sheriff Prosecutor Hart andi Coroner Knoble went to the island Monday morning to further investi- gate the case. They believe the two men got away but are not certartr of this. When the waters of Lake Erie latef Saturday afternoon gave ap the nuds body of a man. just a short distance off the north shore of Kelleyalsland. It HIP first hint of a ghastly nror- on Page WALL STKEET. ARE VOTING ON STRIKE Telegraphers of Cleveland Oirision of Baltimore Ohio May Go Out. Sept. graphers of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad are voting on a strike today. They demand a 10 per cent increase in wages and shorter hours. Sho'ild ft strike be caiied tele- and station agents would co out AT HIGH PRESSURE. The afternoon newspaper is made The fact of showing you the kind of a world you live in day by day again and history that is less than an hour the afternoon aquiver with and life's moods. The advertising in an afternoon paper is a PART OF to minds quickened and made re- xeptive and appreciative by con- tact with the world at clase range combating the trusts after the mar- ket closed. Going After Steel Trust. Sept. mat- ter investigating the steel trust will go on according to Chairman of the house special investi- gating committee. He statement by the president of jthe United States and the attorney geneial that they are determined to enforce the Sherman anti-trust act without fear or is exceedingly gratifying to me. is an effort on the part of ceitain interests to discredit the en- forcement of all anti-trust legislation and to oppose the enforcement of all anti-trust on the ground that they are old fashioned and out of that the prosperity of the coun- try will be endangered by enforcing the law. in my has very little weight. Of ne are all anxious to see the country pros- but it is more important that we should be law abiding than that we should be rich. I am exceedingly anxious to see every man engaged in any business Or industry of kind make but I am not willing to see him take money from other people to whom it properly belongs in order that he be prosperous I am not willing that men should be ghen a plenary indulgence to violate the law that the law which interferes with the plans of the very rich men should be abrogated or any more than I am in favor of annuling toe laws which interfere with the cupidity of very poor men. I am firmly con- vinced the law should applj to all alike this committee continue its investigations in the event the steel j corporation voluntarily Mr Stanley asked himself. committee is not studying the United States Steel corporation alone. It is studying the problem of industrial combinations. A skilled surgeon by dissecting carefully and thoioughly one can determine the nature of the disease affecting it and from his knowledge of mala- dy be the better enabled to detect and treat it in thousands of so this investigating thor- oughly and exhaustively I'm ted States Steel will be en- abled to lay before inipor- data and to Droiwwf vi' Ration affecting imngr.eds Other der. First sunposition was that it was the body of some'man murdered on board a passing bat Justice John Casey of this actias coron- at Kelleys Island Sunday afternoon established the fact that it was the of Antonio Hungarian quarryworker recently employed at the island. Furthermore Acting Coroner Casey says he has every reason to be- lieve the murder was coairaitfed in a small two-story used as a rooming house for foreign on the north side of the island. on Page TOLEDO. picked B. package of par- 'is off the sidewalk swal- lowed part of its contents and died Sunday. It was not until a few botns before his death that Steels informed i his physicians and family what he had done. IIHTENSTOIT City Employe Files Charge Against Leo Horn in Jus- tice Court. Charging that Leo Horn to kill Xat CronenueU. fo of the waterworks cut a peace warrant asrain in Squire Dietrich's co'ii' Ve urday afternoon. Horn t'leartPiJ not was released on and case was set for hearing morning The threats were made in the ence of three but not diiectly to Cronenwett. it ft declared. what was the motive for such language m connection with former WA erworks It not known The report that thmts to km Major also Horn WHS tircntated but could not to .yertitod far is Horn trouble with eltbw Crooenwett. Not lone defendant la a tttM or's 5-5. v   

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