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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: September 18, 1911 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - September 18, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               TODAY'S NEWS TODAY THE HOME PAPER THE SAN DUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SEPTEMBER LAST EDITION NUMBER Aviator in Flight Made Good Headway Sunday. FOWLER FIGHTS FIRE TO SAVE HIS HOTEL Birdman Coming From West Has- Hopes of Resuming Flight Tuesday N. Sept. Af- ter making good progress oa his first day's trip Aviator Rodgers met with an accident early todaj wten resum- ing Ms attempted transcontinental night Ke fell 25 feet when his ma- chine struck a tree. The machine will be repaired today. Rodgers was not seriously injured. Rodgers was at six o'clock this xadining inspecting Ms machine. Twenty-five minutes later he started. He rose 20 feet just missing a stone fence and sailed 500 yards when his right plane struck a hickory tree. The i plane doubled and Rodgers and his ma-chine tumbled down through the branches. In falling Rodgers managed to throw himself clear of the engine but was pinned down by the planes of the injuring his ankie When this wound was dressed Rodg- ers immediately the machine. Rodgers arrived at MIddletown at being sixty-seven miles in an air line from Sheepshead from which he departed-on his long trip at Sunday afternoon. In reaching this by taking a circuuitous covered a total distance of 105 miles and in the remarkable time of 103 minutes. He flewjrom Sheepshead Bay to the railroad station at Jersey a dis- tance of seventeen for the pur- pose of striking the Erie tracks. East of Suffern he lost his way and was soaring over Newburg before he real- ized his position. More than persons were on the Middletown landing place when Podgers came down. Rodgers c'crae into sight at but he could not make a direct landing. He was com- pelled to shoo the crowd away by sev- eral swoops. He then in space feet long and half as wide. Po'lgers outdistanced his special which had left Jersey minutes behind him. The train madi the sixty-seven miles in little mon than seventy-seven but it could not overcome the handicap. Fowler Fights Fire Sept. barely escaped destruction by fire ear- Iv Sunday. Several buildings across the tracks from Gillen's whene Aviator Robert Fowler is staying were destroyed and the who is com- peting in the cross-continent got out of bed at 3 o'clock and worked with the firemen until John W. an old lost life in Mountain View and thefe is another man missing who was neard calling for help. Two men jumped from windows and suffered brofterrlegs. Fowler will leave Colfax for Reno Tuesdav morning at 6 o'clock if his trial flight is successful and he is that the rebuilt biplane is for lilti ullmli tltc aoui- TAFT TO THE RESCUE Thousands Greet the President When He Reaches Detroit to Make Speech. EXECUTIVE DEFENDED COURT IN TRUST CASE JUDGE STAHL Car Driven By Lee Oldfield at Syracuse Crashes Through Fence Into Crowd. mTt5Tthc SleffasT Ward Again Flying N. Sept. Aviator Ward took to the air here at Jkqday resuming his trans- flight He passed El- 36 miles away 30 minutes later. Ward alighted at N. 54 miles from Owego. Peritonitis Sets in After Bullet Is Removed and He Did p Not Rally. Sept Stolypin died today from pistol wounds inflicted while in a theatre. He was born in 1863 and served from 1884 in the government service. Many at- tempts were made on his life. it is with rigid rushing courage that Btolypin approaches his death. Be- Irond giving final advice on how to Complete the task of making real Rus- sians of the people of the outlying provinces Stolypin's only comment feel death coming and I am con- This evening it was stated Stolypin was dying. His family was summoned to uedside. A lengthy bulletin was prepared Sunday evening by the in View of the change for the it was deemed advisable to inform tfe public of the true nature of the premier's wounds The bandages were removed Sunday the mouth of the wound was found be in a satisfactory state. The bullet was felt under the skin and a local anesthetic tH.ng em- ployed The patient stood the opera- tion well in every way. The premier showed no improve- ment during the but the doctors hopefully expressed the opinion that there was no great cause for alarm. the midnight was ttot reassuring. It read- tonight M. Is still ihowing symptoms of N. Sept. of N. died Sun- making the tenth victim of the automobile accident at the state fair grounds which occurred butK an hour President. Taftjeft iiirday. who Was driving the car is in a serious condition and is suffering from internal injuries and broken ribs sustained wten his car crashed through the fence at the track into the crowd. Only one woman in the big crowd was injured although many were knocked down and trampled. machine was traveling at the rate of 75 miles an hour when the accident occurred. The accident oc- curred during the 50 mile race and Bob Burman and Ralph DePalma re- fused to go because of the wet track. are Claud Pred J. Charles Ballantyne James Alex- Y Fayeftte N. Lee Syra- N Y Unknown 60 years Unknown 25 years Uu- known boy. 10 years old Among the dead N. N. N. andria N. who have been iden- tified are Lee driver of the car that left the William Shar- Harry Pharles and Miss Anna all of Syra- cuse. exxxxl e There's many a man like the feller who bragged about the ball room at his house until oncet some visitors want- ed to see it. He showed them the nursery. cooler Tuesday unsettled and cooler. Temperature at 7 a. one year ITS HE KILLED al 5.31 p. m. Maximum wind Telocity for 24 noun ending at noon 18 miles south- east at 9.45 Monday morning. MOURN LAUNCH VICTIMS Memorial Service Held In 'Toledo for Seven City Officials Drowned in Manmee Hirer. Young Man Refuses to Spend Money for Lawyer to Make a Defense. Makes Lengthy Political Speech on First Day of Four to Be Spent in Sept. drizzle of rain greeted President Taft here today he began his four-day tour of Michigan. He whl Bay Sauit Ste. Grand Battle Creek and Kala- mazoo. Taking a trolley trip to Taft SCOTT B. STAHL. Is Captured Monday Morning Through Efforts of Train Dispatcher- WAS RECENTLY SUED BY WIFE FOR DIVORCE Prisoner Was Bui Acted Strangely Since Hear- ing of the Suit Sept. the life term murderer who escaped from the penitentiary woman's clothing last was eap- j lured today at Delaware. inquired as to the trains of the dis-i who recognized him. should have committed said was greeted by children of the -4.4. ru ui t n i i i public schools'who escorted him to i oCOIt Mam OT rOPl UintOn IS i Soboleski when arrested. Police say the speakers' stand. Children lined the entire cheering as the car passed. 1 At a breakfast in his honor Taft 1 expressed the greatest regret at the sudden death of Senator Carter of Cordially Welcomed By Attorneys. Montana. He sent a message of HAS NO FORMAL CEREMONY dolence to Mrs Carter. Taft and the senator were close friends. In his speech at Detioit this after- noon President Taft took up the sub- ject 01 trusts. He said in part' fellow I propose to take up the question which has oc- cupied the attention of the American people for now 20 that of in- dustrial combinations known as- 'trusts'. During the last year we have had two great decisions by the su- preme court of the United States. They are epoch making and the public has not yet come to realize the effect that those decisions are certain to Term Docket is Qalled and Kaisei Manslaughter Case I he intended killing his wife at and guarded her home. Clarence a train was stopped by a man answering- tha description of Soboleski this who inquired to the location of the railroad station. Moyer notified tfis police. When searched a photograplt of his wife and a pair of scissors with 18-inch blades and a small knife were found on Soboi J3ojcdially welcomed by the bar of Erie Judge Scott suc- cessor of Judge made his ini- tial appearance on the common pleas bencn Monday morning. There were no formal ceremonies muoe ueuisiuub are certain 10 .tv 4.1. j- i i have It is not that the construction connection with the judicial change. S. Sept. uel H. charged with the murder of his was placed on trial for his life In criminal court Monday. The case is in some wajs similar to the Beattie. case although Hyde admits guilt and -wants no to defend him. About July one Samuel H. Hyde and his young wife separated. Accord- ing to the -wife's father forced her to leave him. She said it was be- cause cf her husband's treatment. For three weeks Hyde brooded over his and as he de- cided to kill his wife. In his little cell in the county jail he talked freely about It. He says he borrowed a pistol of a friend and waited until when he took a trolley car to his father-in-law's which he passed twice. After the lights had been extinguished but and that turned as was his wife's he knew all were in bed He removed his shoes and stole into his wife's turned up Sept. thou- sand citizens were in attendance at the impressive memorial public ser- vice Sundav at 'Memorial hall in hon- or of the seven men who were drowned when the steel 'freighter Philip of ran down the launch Nemo in September 2. Music was rendered by the Toledo____________________________ Mannen Choir and Bowers Band when she fell he felt hei pulse to the lolian Quartet. The services were in respect to memory of Harry T. the light and informed her that he had come she kill awakened her. He fired three shots into her body pled with Hyde. his superintendent of Fred secretary to Director Pub- lic Service William William Thomas Purcell and Rudolph Yunker. DICTAGRAPH RESUMES ITS SORDID TALE AS INDICTED OHIO SOLONS FACE JURY Transcript of Sept wheels of justice have again began to revolve in the legislative jbiibery S'andal. Two con' already resulted from tv of membAra tha ctions lature indicted on charges of bribe- seeking. With the opening this week of the fall term of others are expected. IConiiiuuul on JfajxA 7j be sure she was dead. Then her fa- aroused by the grap- pistol was emptied he managed to get one cartridge into it and while locked in the arms of his father-in-law he shot him from the bullet pier- cing the elder man's heart. A young sister-in-law was acci- dentally wounded as she lay in bed. says his wife was a good wom- an and be just could not see hei taken from him in this way ASSAILANT IDENTIFIED N. D Sept. 18 Da- confessed assailant and abductor of Miss Eleanor Gladys the Manitoba school was posi- tively identified by the girl as the man who appeared at the school house in Pembina Valley last Monday morning and held hei capthe for more than thirty horns in the timber near- by Davis was brought here and lodged m jail which the court has put upon the act is different from that which most members of the and most subordinate and indeed the supreme court had before in- dicated as the proper of the but it is that it is now fi- nally by two fully considered decisions in respect to two of the largest and most powerful of these what their illegality consists and how they are to be in view of are' flfegaf and ao violate the provisions of the so-called anti-trust or Sherman act. the statute was passed in 1890 the expressions used in it to de- fine its object and what it was pro- posed therein to denounce as unlaw- ful were not but they were suf- ficiently broad and indefinite to re- quire judicial construction to settle their meaning. It- has required 20 years of litigation to make the statute clear. But now it is clear. is said that the supreme court has read something into the statute that was not ttere befoie. that it has inserted the word before restraints of when tne same court had said that this could not be properly because ongress had evidently not intended to include such a Attorneys crowded around the new incumbent before the and assured him of their bet wishes. 1 o a the Port Clinton man was well and favorably known by reasoa of associations in legal and his pleasing personality was soon impressed on the rest. Commenting on Judge Stahl's ele- vation to the local attorneys recalled that he was tne oniy demo cratlc common pleas judge Jane jflBjBfe fnr twenty Tie last one of that Judge was appointed by Gov- ernor Campbell. Practically every member of the bar was on hand in the court room when the docket for the term .was callPd by the new judge. It was un- usually and the work consumed over an hour. The docket was found to contain twenty-eight cases that at- torneys had agreed to but the proper entries had not been made J The most important action taken by Judge Stahl was the assignment of the Kaiser manslaughter case for two weeks from Monday. It would On Page UP TO THE MINUTE. Store-news is Real touch- interests ing'tne pUrSe__________ people. And the people like in store news as f tj'iey like it in the general news of the day. Advertising in an evening news- peper impresses of as the the paper is up to the minute in ALL respects. If you want advertis- Ing to have print it WITH news. leski. Disguised in a long black eoaVbs- longing to Mrs wife of War- den and wearing a skirt and cu4-hat and heavy the man walk- ed out of the prison Sunday between and fhe o'clock. He al- so wore a gray suit belonging to tha wa'rdea's son under tne disguise. It 1st believed that he shaved off his mus- tache and powdered his face before leaving. He had which he had earned about the place while acting as a Soboleski had been a tot the past five months and was accord- ed the freedom of the warden's apart- having' the duty of preniag the clothing of family this betas in accordance with his former trade of tailor. Soboleski's wife filed suit for several -weeks ago and -sfnce that Md attempted to commit Immediately after the escape discovered guards were seat to iill railroad yards gad through the surrounding asyi communication opened tip with neigh- boring towns. By sjl prisoners employed near the wardens home it was ascertained that tne pseudo oman was seen to leaW an aged negro The negro glimpsed a trouserjfd beneath the skirts running Warden Resche with his was about to go tolff him rr'soner was escaping. The warden is have been set for next but f or i said to have searched all streets the fact that the sessions of the cir- cuit court begin at that time. KILLED AS HE DREW KNIFE and allejs. but finding no gave up the chase and continued his drive under the impression the negro had perpetrated a joke Soboleski was sentenced to the pea- _ iitentiaij lor the muMes of a a-aged Police Unable to Learn Who couple cf June 22. 1909. -Tha crime at that time attracted much at- Although Defense tention because o fthe horrifying de- Is Claimed. tails connected with it. iflfifl he went to tb.e was shot and killed at the corner of E. 28th street and Oakwood ave- nue Men examined by the police Braski was engaged in a quarrel and had drawn a knife when his antagon- ist shot him. Thus far witnesses refused to reveal the identity of the man who did the shooting. The bullet entered the left eye ana 'odged at the base of the brain. home Ladwig Krueger and crass. nnj-aered both Krueger MA YOR HANNA URGES MUNICIPAL REFORM and his wife in order to get possession of the Krueger property valued at After stabbing the couple to he buried their bodies in cellai and set fire to the house. Their bodies were found on Aprit 1st and Soboleski was immediately ar-- rested Trial was held almost diately and he was convicted on cumstantial evidence. Wife is Guarded. TOLEDO. Sept and' relatives guarded the home of Mrs. Pauline Soboleski here today. MrsC Soboleski recently filed suit for a di-- vorce and believes that her husband angered by this is determined to kill I her. Local police watched every traia- jand interurban car that entered In Notable Address at Sunyendeand Club Saturday He itity- Teiis What Commission Form Means. Food and Drink Is Sent to 11 Three Victims of Cave-in Through Iron Pipe. Sept no further difficulties are experienced by the rescuers at work m tae Morning Star the three miners impris- oned in a dnft below will be released soon The rescuers are working ia shifts of six hours but the work is difficult and dangeious The shaft is one of the qldest in the dis- trict and there is constant danger of the old timbers breaking loose while the work is progressing and starting a run of earth and rock. In the meantime the imprisoned men are making the best of the situa- tion in the 350 feet below. An iron pipe was driven from the top of the cave to within thirty feet of the drift and food and hot coffee lowered to the men. They complain of the but who seems to be the leader of the has kept up the spirits of the others by singing and SOME HANNAGRAMS municipal governments have been a stench in the nostrils of our othei city is not a little state- its problems are of not of affairs of seek the effectiveness of public joa may expect legislation on behalf of the public at real leak in the public monej does not come from casual stealing but from lax methods Des Moines. everybody is a candidate on bis own merits. The people of Des Moines resent bringing party politics in munici- pal campaigns make good citizens out of your people if you put responsi- bility upon them commission form of gov- ernment doesn't make all men honest but it helps the great ma- of them to be build our public Improve- ments as business men would build their a political party lakes a certain stand on the tariff ques- is no reason it has a place in the affairs of municipal gov- Bank There Is Evidence of Care iessness at Cincinnati. Nearly one hundred of SandusKy's most prominent business and profes- sional men. gathered at the Sunyan- j deand club Saturdaj were told how pioud the city of Des is of its commission form of how it came to pass that Qfafp it abolished ward party poll- I I tics and and what the commis- sion forte has really done for Des I 1 Moines All this was told bj Prof. James P Hanna. the piesent major of 'Des Moines The story was told j in a manner to stamo Major Hanna Sept not only as a deep student of econo- politan bank and tiust company closet out a man who with his asso- ns doors today on order from tha uates. has made good in practice as state banking department. Exam well as theon If the Baxter said the bank has in of manj of the citizens who heard Deposits and will fall short ot Major Harfias lecture are any mdi- meeting its obligations An investijja- the seeds of the commission- js said to have shown the buk plan were not sown upon barrtn ha'l not been conservative in its tnw- ground in Sandusky. 'sactiotia. Before he became majcr of far as we can see there har- James R. Hanna was nrofes-' been no criminality on the part sor in economics at Highland Park i said Baxter. ftat University. As Woodrow Wilson cast j carelessness and bad aside his ed'iiationat duties to do ment. In the liquidation battle for federal and state will be taken care of VN e so over three and half will be able to pay did Prof. Hanna. the educator enter all that's due the arena of politics to fight for bet- ter and purer municipal government of his hofflf cih. Des Moines. Today his city is pointed to as the model for all municipality who are seeking on Fage Another Bank Sept Tradesmen's Trust Oi with if capital of 4oera day. Peter Boyd is prMldtot. F W   

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