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Sandusky Star Journal: Wednesday, September 13, 1911 - Page 1

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - September 13, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        A .i( THE HOME PAPER TODAY'S NEWS TODAY THE SANDUSKY STAR -JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, SEPT, 13, 1911, LAST EDITION The barber in our town had a great ambition to be a pugilist, but he losl his voice and had to is Compelled to Come Down 22 Miles From New York in Transcontinental Race. both pro- FOWLER MAY BE HELD TWO DAYS FOR REPAIRS Machine Was Badly Wrecked In His Fall at Foot of the Sierra Nevadas, Forecast Unset- tled tonight and Thursday; not much change ture. at 7 a. m., 66; NUMBER 289 WHERE WILL HE LAND? People in Panic Flee For Their Lives, Leaving Behind Their Entire Possessions. 1UU in miu. tempera-! BRAVES DEATH DOWN VESUVIUS FOR PEOPLE one NEW YORK, Sept. Ward, America's youngest aviator, ascended from Governor's Island at a. m. today in an attempt to beat Robert Fowler in a trans- continental flight for the prize offered. .Fowler's fall yes- terday puts the two men on about even terms. Soon after sailing up the Hudson. Ward lost his way over New Jersey and came down 22 miles from the starting point. He hopes to reach Buf- falo by tonight. Ward landed in a wheat field and was entertained at tea by Miss-Emily 'Robinson, on whose farm he alighted while a search was made for a map. After" -leaving Governor's Island Ward was-next beard from flying be- tween Newark and Elizabeth. He took up the Lehigh valley tracks and dis- appeared due west. Then he appar- ently lost his way and began heading back east. His landing at Ashbrook was entirely unexpected and created great-excitement. "Well, of all things I ever said Miss Robinson, as Ward glided from the in front of her home. At the" house the aviator explained he became Confused and realizing he was entirely off his course decided the only way to learn his whereabouts wns to alight. Natives had to go four Sun rises Thursday at a. m. and sets at p. m. (standard time.) Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today 14 miles south at Tuesday evening. Gov. Hay So Characterizes In- demnity Casualty and Lia- bility Companies O'NEAL STARTS A BIG ROW Calls Initiative, Referendum and Recall "Insidious Pop- ular Vagary" miles for layed. a map and Ward was de- Delayed Two Dais. ALTA, Cal., Sept. 13-----Robert Fowler will probably be delayed two cays in the transcontinental air trip by the injury to his biplane Tuesday. JBaila of the machine were replaced iffom extra parts carried in the special train but it will be necessary to send parts to Reno to be repaired. Before leaving Auburn he had trou- ble with his engine and just as he reached this place his steering gear went wrong and his biplane dashed in- to two trees at full speed. Fowler was hurled to the ground and although not badly injured his plane was wrecked. He had sailed 40 miles when the ac- cident happened, making him KiO miles on his way to the Atlantic coast. Three mechanicians are repairing Fowler's biplane here today and he expects to resume his transcontinen- tal flight Friday or Saturday. Soars 200 Miles. AUBURN, Me., Sept. such an exhausted condition he was unable to SPRING LAKE, N. J., Sept. Employers' liability and workmen's compensation were the subjects dis- cussed by the governors' conference today. Governors Hay, of Washing- ton, and1 Foss, of Massachusetts, were the principal speakers. Governor Hay attacked the indemnity, casualty and liability companies as "social para- sites" and explained Washington's plan of dealing with the workingmen's problem. Governor Corey talked on woman's suffrage. He said he understood women might gain the right to vote in Oregon and California this year and if that proved true the move- ment would then sweep steadily east- ward. Discussing the political situa- tion Governor Aldrich, of Nebraska, said Bryan was still strong in Ms state and did not believe a demo- cratic presidential nominee could be named without Bryan's sanction. Governor Corey, of Wyoming, to- day stated that he intended to bring the divorce question before the con- ferences. He believes that marriages being civil contracts, should be as binding in one state as another, so that when one court forbids a man remarrying the order does not be- come void by his moving into an- other state temporarily. Gov. Emmet O'Neal of Alabama pre- cipitated a stormy debate at the first session of the conference by declaring the 'nitiative and referendum and re- Professor Makes Investigation in Order to Prepare Warn- ings in the Future, CATANIA, Italy, Sept. 13. Panic stricken, the people are fleeing from the vicinity of Mt Etna and it is fear- ed that there may be loss of life. The crater continues to belch forth ashes and lava and new craters are form- ing. Mt. Etna's entire summit is a boil- ing caldron today. Because of the dense smoke it is difficult to tell how many fissures have opened but there seem to be at least 30 belching flames. The eruption is hourly in- creasing in violence. MT. EISA'S EECORD -First eruption re- B. C. 467 corded. To A. D. eruptions. A. D. destroyed; killed. A. D. villages buried; many killed. A. D. damaged; killed. A. D. than killed. A. D. eruption. A. D. eruption. A. D. farms devas- tated. A. D. eruption. A. D. erup- tion. A. D. eruption. A. D. eruption. The crest of Mt. Etna presents a ter- rifying spectacle toady. Heavy smoke lies over it, with frequent brilliant flashes, and the bombardment which is cbirtfaruous Tine "nearly two miles in extent, is like the flreing of heavy artillery. A torrent of burn- ing lava .estimated at feet wide and four feet deep, is pouring down the slope. Everything in its way has been carried before. Groves of trees have been uprooted1 and set on fire and the lava stream is sweeping through the fields, sending out for miles around hot resinous wave of smoke. The peasants have left their homes, carrying with aged, the sick and the children and whatever meager belongings they were able to get together. Whole regions- covered with har- dened lava from past eruptions have been torn open by the frequent earth STAIE IS Sli DOLE m Despite Reported Interview, He Cannot Be Found at French Lick Hotel WRITING HIS MEMOIRS ONE STORY DECLARES No Trace of Missing Senate Officer Here While State- ments Conflict Errors Found In First Figures, Turns Tables on "Wets" Who Claimed Victory. PORTLAND, Me., Sept. 119 places yet to be heard from Maine returns at noon today increase the prohibition majority to 521. The greatest surprise was express- ed over the sudden change in the re- suit. The early returns were account- shocks. Many of these have been of ed for by the explanation that they great violence and the peasants fear a repetition of the Messina disaster. Sixteen new fissures have opened "Williams College Aeronautical Society than an popular vagary." who made a balloon ascension from As soon as the reactionary govern- Pittsfleld, Mass., was found on a farm near here. The distance from Pitts- or from finished his in which he denounced all reforms talk. H. B. Shearman, president of the I call movement to be nothing more j and from the two nearest the base of the volcano a great stream of lava issues. It is moving at the rate of feet an hour and today had covered several miles in the direction of Linkuaglossa, northeast of Etna and Randazo, to the northwest. The residents are panic stricken. The earth shocks continue and the (Continued on Page 5) field to Auburn by air line is approx- j wnich. gove more power to the major- Shearman hoped j Hy, the chief executives of a half doz- en states were on their feet clajnoring for recognition. Prominent among (Continued on Page 5) innately 200 miles, to fly into Canada. He was probably on one of his qualifying trips for a pilot's license. Goes to New -York. DAYTON, 0., Sept. C. T. Rogers left here today for New (York with his new Wright biplane to start Saturday or Sunday on his flight across the continent. Rogeis will be- followed by a special tram and is confident of success. Aviator Injured. 'HERICOURT, FRANCE, Sept. Aviator Vedrine, winner of the re- cent European circuit race, was probably fatally injured today. fell great height. Delayed several hours by high winds Ward resumed his transcontinental flight this afternoon, heading for New- ark. He will follow the Erie railroad. NIGHT WATCHMAN WAS KILLED; FIRE. KING MEN LANDED ATLAS! CHICAGO, Sept. that ernment were unable to prosecute the S. A. Potter is "king of the confi- dence men." C. F. DeWoody, divis- ion superintendent of the department of justice, placed him under arrest in this city. He is alleged to have operated in nearly every large city of this country and England and it is said that the Scotland Yard de- tectives have been trjing to 'capture him. Gold games brick schemes, gieen goods and mine are his- specialties and the detectives say he has secured not less than There are many mem- CINCINNATI, Sept. body in this way. of George Miller, 48, night" watchman, i bers of the gang, was recovered from the ruins of thej They are alleged Cincinnati Veneer company's plant to- day. It was first reported several lives had been lost in adjoining tene- ments but alj escaped. The loss is about ?50.000. an office in to Chicago have opened Plot Discovered in Attempt to Again Place Manuel on the Throne in Portugal LISBON. Sept. ar- rests are being made as a result of the discovery of a formidable royal- ist plot asainst the new Portuguess republic. Important documents were seized today implicating several per- sonal friends of King Manuel. High republican officials "say Man- uel is encouraging the royalists and complaint will probably be sent to tne British minister of foreign affairs. It is considered not unlikely that Man- uel will receive a hint that his pres- ence to BO longer desired in England., place they advertised from their which green goods and when the unwary replied they received bundles of blank paper, and having tried to defraud the gov- swindlers. George W. Under the Post, Potter name of is charged with swindling in an indictment re- turned here in the United States court in July, 1910. Potter and a compan- ion Edward Starkloff are also wanted in Philadelphia where they jumped a cash bond of The prisoner may be taken there for trial as it is believed that he can be given a longer sentence there and that the evidence is better. Chief DeWoody refused to accept a cash bond of in the case of Potter here, declaring that nothing less than would get him out. The police believe Starkloff is in the city and are searching for him. A large quantity of evidence was found at his home and a long "sucker" list was found containing the names of many people over the country in rural districts. were taken over the telephone and the figures misunderstood. Of the other referendum questions before the people that proposing to make Augusta forever capital of the state and that favoring the direct pri- maries act were carried by large ma- jorities, according to returns. With no cities and only 196 towns missing out of 521, following is the vote on the proposition: Retaining capital at no, Direct no, FLORIST KILLS SELF WHILE DESPONDENT CINCINNATI, 0., Sept. pled by rheumatism and unable to rare for the rose gardens which were his chief delight, Adam Fischer, flor- ist, committed suicide by hanging. His body was found today in the hay loft of a stable in the rear of his house. BIG CROWDS OUJ FOR COUN 7 Y FAIR EVENTS Air Flights, Motorcycle and Horse Races and Other Feat- ures of Program Prov ed Great Attractions. Crowds such as well might have been expected with such favoring weather conditions, made their way highly successful, the congestion of traffic on Camp street being relieved. Secretary Zerbe was very well vvurl J ltjl_l Ulj CIO Y Cl V Ct i to the Erie County fair Wednesday. It pleased Wednesday afternoon with was children's day and veterans' day" and apparently, also, a day for almost everyone else who could come away from business or work. And there was something doing ev- ery minute. In addition to the usual fair attractions and exhibits and the the turn-out. He estimated the at- tendance to be about the same as on Wednesday of thought it was last yean larger. Many Aviator Le Van, it was announced, would attempt his first flight about 4 ofclock. He was busy getting his amusement features, there were mot-1 biplane in shape while the motor- orcycle races, horse races and finally cyclists and horses were racing on Lievan, the fir racer. were hoping that the birdman would not disappoint them. The crowds commenced arriving early in the forenoon, country people bringing their dinners. Soon after noon people from the city began to the track. The motor-cycle speed events af- forded plenty of sport before the horses were called oat. For the three-mile novice race there were no entries, but two other events called out fast riders. pour into the grounds. School chll-1 Then ten-mile open race was won dren were to be seen everywhere, by Huntsburg, of Cleveland, with The Boy Scouts, in full uniform, marched to the grounds in a body, presenting a fine appearance Le Van was scheduled for a flight early in the afternoon. Following his inability to fly Tuesday because of the high wind, he gave up the plan of sailing over the city in the morn- ing, preferring to wait until after- noon when the crowds could see him arise and then land. Many looked over his machine. Many autoists went to the grounds Wednesday and the new arrangement of having a special auto gate proved Tracy, of Cleveland, second. Willis, of Canton, did not finish, owing to a fall. He was not badly hurt. The time was The five-mile stock race, with a good field of starters, was exciting. Fletcher, of Elyria. won, with Feder- kiel, of Sandusky. second; Trillis, Canton, third; Standen. Lorain, fourth; Tracy, Cleveland, fifth; Freidsenstein. Eljria, sixth. The time was It was 3 o'clock when the horses were called out for the first heat of the afternoon's program. CAUGHT THE SPIDER. CHICAGO, Sept. pecu- liar evolution of a water spider led Alfred Yurs, 2, on a thirty- six hour tramp and kept a posse Where is Col. Rodney J. Diegle? Is he preparing a confession? These questions remained un- answered Wednesday while con- flicting rumors as to his where- abouts could not be confirmed. Reports that he was at French Lick. Ind., working on a confes- sion, were emphatically denied and it was claimed he was in Dayton. While word tame from him, mail- ed from Dayton Monday evening, the Associated Press sent out dis- patches from French Lick, de- claring Diegle to be there with At- torney Egan and Detective Harry Bradbury. Mrs. Diegle claimed Tuesday nigi'it to have received a telephone message from the col- onel at Dayton. Wednesday it was reported he had been seen in Sandusky but this could not be confirmed. Upon the assertion Diegle that she had received a telephone message Tuesday night from her hus- band who, she said, was then in Day- ton. a systematic search was made in that city Wednesday for missing man. It had- been reported that he was in conference with his attorneys. Mrs. Diegle could not tell at what ho- tel he was stajing. According to Day- ton dispatches, no trace of Diegle or Attorney John Egan could be found Wednesday and Attorney C. J. Mat- tern refused to discuss the report tbat the two had met in his office. "Diegle and Egan were also reported to have been seen entering a bath-house but this place has been closed for month. According to French Lick dispatch- es, Diegle made this brief statement: "I'll tell all. Xever mind what I'm writing-. Call it my memoirs of politics if you want to. There will be no doubt of what I say after Mon- day." Despite this, special correspond- ents were unable to find Diegle it French Lick and Thomas Taggsrt, proprietor of the hotel who !s per- sonally acquainted with the colonel, declared he had not been there. Guests failed' to identify a picture all sections of the state, Wednesday, came inquiries as ta Diegle's whereabouts. According to a report that seems to haro some foundation, it is understood that Diegle is somewhere preparing a con- fession and that he has been prom- ised leniency by the prosecutor ana attorney general of tic should he "come through." Diegle has been located in a dozen different parts of the country and is being -largely sought for by newspaper correspond- ents who scent a sensational tale in any disclosures he may make. All efforts to locate Diegle here Wednesday failed. Big Four were watched but ae was not a pas- senger. He was said not to be at his home. Some of his close friends declared they had not seen him. Although making no direct state- ment, attorneys for the defense at Co- lumbus intimated that Diegle would remain in Dayton until after" the near- ing of the appeal to the circuit court. (Continued oa Page 6} MOVING VANS MAY CART OFF PERSONAL GOODS, IF DELINQUENT TAXES ARE NOT PAID SOON Do any of the three thousand de-1 a step. of fifty excited farmers out of bed I linquent" taxpayers of this county They say that in open defiance of ror twenty-lour noars. wanf tn spo ir, orders of taxing authorities, many BERLIN HEIGHTS WEDDO6. Special to The Star-Journal: BERLIN HEIGHTS. Sept 13. la the presence of about fifty relatives and friends, Tuesday evening, Miss Mabel Romell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Romell. of the Lake View House, became the bride or Clark Hine. a well-known young .man. The ceremony was performed at sev- en o'clock by the Rev. A. G. Rupert. Just as they were ready to give up hope, the searchers came upon want to see moving stop in of their residences and places of business, and cart off their per- the infant sitting beside a creek. gonal property? He had been without food or shel- j This was done in Cleveland several ter for thirty-six hours, but m one years ago, under the instructions of hand was triumphantly clutched the county treasurer, and caused the crushed spider. bjg Commotion "I got it he said, as his rassment and father picked him up. and lots of embar- humiliation to indi- viduals. And the Erie county author- I ities are seriously considering such AVIATORS WINCING THEIR WAY ACROSS CONTINENT IN COMPETITION FOR PRIZE OF BOY PATHFINDER, LEAVING 'FRISCO. EXPECTS TO FINISH OCTOBER 10 "55 AH SSA.JIS 31 With Fowler and Ward already started, the aeroplane race across the continent is becoming interesting. One or more of the birdroen may pass over Sandusky. At wood, Parraalee, Oving- ton and Rodgers will be contestaats. persons, some piominent in business circles, fall to return personal prop- erty, and that there are numerous instances where well-to-do persons have not paid anything on persona! property in years. Analysis of the situation shows an unusually large number of delinquent personal taxpayers in the county, and the amounts they owe will soar over Many sums run back six or seven years. The list of delinquents will be read publicly by the county commissioners the latter part of this week, or the first part of next week. After that, the manner in which the amounts shall be cojlected, is up to County Treasurer Nuhn. Cavairy at Camp Perry Ordereer to Search for Assailant At Elmore. TOLEDO. 0., Sept. D, of Toledo. Ohio cavalry, encamped at Camp Perry, was ordered out today- at noon to search for a stranger who criminally assaulted Edna Bunce, at NEWARK, 0., Sept. 13. James! Elmore, 0., late yesterday. Posses Brown, 12. son of Charles P. Brown, died as the result of an accident while playing baseball. In base sliding his head struck the baseman's knee. TODAY'S NEWS TODAY The evening newspaper is a good advertising medium be- cause it is "the has tfat magic potency of the "last word" about things and the ads. partake of this quality of UNFAILING IN- TEREST! The person who, can tell you the very latest fact about something that interests you is a person or real interest to and that's the friend-making qu.ll- ity in the evening paper. sought the stranger all of last night. Captain Webster, who is also prose- cuting attorney, immediately respond- ed to the call of Mayor Crosier and the men began the of the ritory between Eiiaore and Toledo. which direction the man is supposed to have gone. The officials and mili- tary oien hare little hopes of captur- ing the stranger owing to licence of the family in talking of Ukf affair. The little girl was on way the grocery when accosted by tM stranger. With vroutes of candy M. easily persuaded to go wfili to the outskirts of the village he attacked her. The wac parently drunk. J; NEWSPAPER!   

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