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Sandusky Star Journal: Saturday, September 9, 1911 - Page 1

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - September 9, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        I FOUR STAR WRtTERS WILL CONTRIBUTE ARTICLES OF .NTEREST TO WOMEN FOB THE STAR-JOURNAL. BEGINNING NEXT WEEK: A 6REAT FEATURE. cr'RTY-FCURTh YEAR KY STAR-JOURNAL. SANDUSKY, OHIO, SATURDAY, SEPT, 9, 1911, LAST EDITION NUMBER 286 I CONFESSION, DIEQLE GIVEN TlEElARlENTENCE Murderer Hears Doom Unflinchingly an Trial Ends. COURT SAYS HE MUST NOVEMBER 28 Father and' Brother Sob as Verdict Is Announced But Crowd Is Quiet, CHESTERFIELD C. H., Va., Sept. The home-loving, old- fashioned morality of proud Ches- terfield farmers was blamed to- day by Henry Clay Beattie, jr., for his conviction of wife murder. The. inability of the stern-faced, religious countrymen to under- stand the low moral tone of city life, with its sordid immorality, was quoted by Beattie today as the cause of his death sentence. "A country jury cannot under- stand how a fellow gets mixed up __ women of the said _Beattie._ "Beulah Binford had much to do with that verdict, more than the real facts and evidence about the killing." "I would like to read the news- papers." wns Beattie's first request this morning. If he M'orried over Ins verdict he did not show it. Not X tremor or quiver of an eyelid at the thought of his awful fate was appar- ent in the youth today. If there ever was a stoic, Henry Clay Beattie is VERDICT PLEASING CALMLY FACES DEATH, STILL HOPEFUL GREAT LOCAL INTEREST "It serves him was the general comment of Sandusky peo- pie, both men and women, when the news came that Henry Clay Beattie, jr., had been found guilty of murder. Star-Journal bulletins, posted shortly before six o'clock, gave the first news of Vie convic- tion. There had been much inter- est in the case. Five Aldermen and City Engi- neer Also Charged With Soliciting Bribes. cne. "I have not yet lost Beattie eaid this morning. "If that jury had given a verdict solely on the evidence USED "DICTAGRAPH" AGAIN T, B, Dean, of Heating Com- pany, Was Responsible for .Bringing About Arrests, GARY, Ind., April Thom- as E. Knotts, City Engineer C. M. Williston, Aldermen Walter Gibson, Dominick Szymanski and Bolic Szy- manski.1 his son, Emerson L. Bowser, John Simiasko, Antony Baukus, are under arrest in this "model pity" charged with soliciting or receiving hribes. The startling-arrests came Thurs- ing and Power company, of Louisville, Ky., who claims to have evidence pro- through the use .of the.'. "-dicta- -whisk ..sctjjf oTmiSSgS'y presented to them I would have been day afternoon at the instance of T. acquitted, but they were impressed B. of the Dean Heat- by the story of .jny relations with Beulah Binford convicted -me solely on that point. I the court of appeals will look at. the matter in a different light." Rumors of possible attempted sui- cide resulted in the placing of a dou- ble, guard around the cell. Within a day or two Beattie will be taken to whera he will be placed in a death cell in murderer's row at the 'state penitentiary. in connection with the legislative graft disclosures, which will support his, charges. He claims that the. bribes were solicited in consideration! for giving his company a heating con- tract: i Mayor Knotts was the first one to be arrested. Dean entered the mayor's AN INTIMATE "PROFILE VIEW OF HENPY CLAY BEATTIE.cJQ. ODAWM FROM LIFE Intense- local interest in the Die- gle case was shown by the num- ber of telephone inquiries which poured into the Star-Journal fice, beginning about nine o'clock Saturday morning. News cf the action of Judge Kinkead was re- ceived a few moments after ten o'clock, the passing of sentence having been slightly delayed. Bui- letins were at once issued. Mrs. Diegls had gone to Columbus Fri- day afternoon, leaving here at She had declined to com- ment on the case. One Week's Suspension Allowed to Enable Appeal to Circuit Court and So Prison Doors Did Not Open. Wife, Sister and Brother Accompanied. Convicted, Man, Whose Voice Letter From ;OSd Sunday.School Jeacher, PUT, IN B A Y SHE FOR MEMORIAL ACCEPTED Possibility Now that Monument Will Not Be Completed Before 1913, But Eisenmann Plans Are Dropped From Committee. Sad Tragedy at Middle Bass Club Today Shocks Dis- tinguished Guests. GIRL FIRED FATAL SHOT Chicago Family About to Leave for Home When Accident Occurred, office where he signed the heating franchise. Before entering the room "Your life shall .be the., words-.with .which Judge ......_ __c UIB Watson conveyed to Henry Clay Beat- Dean had himself searched bv tie, jr., his sentence -of death in the nesses to that he had the electric of his A few minutes later he emerged from the executive chamber. on" the Midlothian turnpike on the night of July to the sentencing of the pris- oner twelve Virginia farmers had He submitted to another search to show that the money was gone Dean then called to Deputy Sheriffs Elocki and Morris and told them to After the ballot the men did not has- ten to theQkrart. room. Again they knelt in pftfyer asking God to have v mercy upon .the soul of the young man j Special to The Star-Journal: PUT-IN BAY, O., Sept ferences over the selection of a plan and design for the proposed Perry memorial reached an open break today when, at noon, it was announced that Col. Webb C. Hayes, of Fremont, a member of the Ohio commission, had been dropped from the executive com- mittee of the inter-state -commis- sion. John J. Manning of Toledo succeeds him. Hayes threatens to resign as Ohio commissioner and apparently there i-s bitter feeling. The action was a victory for Sec- and Hayes has been brewing for some time. Hayes went to Washington to endeavor to have the memorial site changed to Green Island and for this he was repudiated by some of his fel- low members. Then Hayes arranged for a trip to the Canton McKinley memorial but most of the commission- ers refused to Preparing to leave for her home In Chicago after a pleasant out- ing, Mrs. Lewis Wuichet, wife of a prominent and wealthy Chicago man. was shot and painfully wounded and her little son, Eu- gene, aged seven, was instantly killed in a corridor of the exclu- sive Middle Bass club, w'lere she had been a guest, Saturday morn- ing about 8 o'clock. The fatal shot was accidentally fired by a daughter, Mary Wuichet, aged 14. The mother, while not seriously wounded, is prostrated. The tragedy caused excitement and cast a gloom .over the Middle Bass club, where Gen. Nelson A.. Miles. Rear Admiral Clark, U. S. N., Gen! J. Warren Keifer and other notables were guests. Wuichet and her children had been popular at the club. It is the old story of "didn't know it was loaded." Mrs. Wuichet, the children and a maid were in the cor- ridor, packing up the family belong- ings when the little girl, if is said, prcked up the revolver which was supposed not to be loaded. She play- fully snapped it at her mother and the gun was discharged. The bullet struck Mrs Wuichet in the side in- flicting a flesh wound and then passed on to the little boy, standing behind 'her. The bullet entered the boy's arm Sept. the Ohio penitentiary at hard labpr -was- the sentence- imposed, by Judge B. .Kinkead in the 'common upon Calonel Rodney J. Diegle, of Sandusky, senate sergesnt-at-arms.. and convjcted go-between in Vie legislative bribery deals. No fine-was-.imposed. ,A stay of exscution was granted until September to give .Diegltfs attorneys time to appeal the case to the circuit court. who finally refused to make any confession or add to the state. j-.ment he had given out a week ago-remained unmoved when Judge Kin- kead pronounced the sentence, but Mrs. Diegle broke down and wept. Diegle, who was accompanied in court by his wife, sister and brother, simply rose and said he had nothing to say when the court "gave him an opportunity to speak before passing sentence. He was much excited and his voice was tremulous but otherwise he showed no emotion. Both Diegle and her sister wept. "It will be the death of that said C. J. Mattern of Dayton, associate counsel in the case. The court room was densely packed with a curious throng anxious to see the end of the sensational case. C. E. Belaher and John A. Connor Columbus and C. J. Mattern and John E. Egan of Dayton, the tatter Diegle's personal counsel, and the others counsel for the senators indict- ed jointly with Diegle, were present in court. MEW PICTURE OF MAN SENTENCED TO PRISON Crown Pn t h BaH bond- to L t siSd fo? Se e ington. While no decision had yet been reached as to the plans, o vee sid fo e mvo -.whom they believed guilty of one of by nis bJXre I St the most revolting crimes ever com- Of Hammond nnfl Wnv- n" n mitt anS mitted of the 0 and tne Plan fel1 shattering the bone, and then passed through Hayes had the backing of i into his bodv, piercing the heart The former Governor Myron T. Herrick I mother's scream of pain wallowed and the Canton tnp was in the inter- j by the boy's one cry as he fell o The est of the design submitted by H. floor. The girl became frantic wher Van Buren .Magomgle. architect of she saw what had happened y raemorial Tt ls now Dr- Robinson sumomned from said that Hayes cannot secure more Put-in Bay and attended the wound than four votes for these plans while ed mother but nothing could be done there will be nearer forty for the for the hoy. mile In invest igaHon be made H emain that blame can be attached to the little -v' had planned to entertain girl. of the case. SS members of the commission at a din- ner at the Middle Bass club last night j Edward P. Qtuck, of the Krupp un- but his plan failed' and as a result! dertaking rooms, went to Middle Bass some 200 pounds of fried chicken went ion the steamer Arrow to prepare the to waste. was waiting at the boy's body for burial club but when the Dorothea came Mrs. Wuichet was Miss Bertie West I along with the commissioners aboard, a daughter of the late Charles West' (Continued on Page Two.) AM IDS HE PfiOIESI young Szymanski antl thp others were i picked up in quick order and tro i seven wore taken to Crown Point, 1 where they were released following their giving bonds. "The accusation against me is ab- said thn mayor. "I have ac- cented no bribe money and will be able to prove as much when the time comes." MEMORIAL FOR bery scandal. Ceremony Was Performed by Congregational Minister at the Colonel's Villa. "NEWPORT, R. I., Sept. 9.-Colonel .John Jacob Astor, 47, and Miss Made- Force. 18. were married in Col- oner Astor's villa today by the Rev. WALL FELL; TWO KILLED Contractor and Stone Mason Cnished to Death and Two Others Are Hurt. it seemed certain that the of John Eisenmann, of Cleveland, would be accepted this afternoon. The most, sensational develop- ment today was the possibility that no attempt will be made to complete the monument before 1913. 'fl j -----._. VV PS I The trouble between Huntington j Commander Warner said he had or-' prominent Toledo wholesale drue- ;__________ ____jders go to Put-in Bay and so the gist. Her husband is a wealthy lum- was landed here. Hayes, it is berman in Chi-rago said, was furious and said he would i Mayor Alexander, of Put-in Bav refuse to serve longer on the commit- i acting coroner, after hearin" the OJ H PJTDDV Senator T. A. j statement of Dr. Robinson, deeded n. [Dean, of Fremont, was with him !that no inquest was necessary Last night Gen. Miles. Read Clark. Gen. Keifer. Col. Sterrrtt and i others were at the Middle Bass club Tf A H A n i-t A as .guests but Col. Hayes went to Put- i PA PPP RrtT m Bay. JL.4 7 J. JLM I J, jj While the commissioners of the fed- eral government and various states were trying to gpt down to business today, island peopH assisted by some I notables, celebrated the centennial anniversaray There were sneerhes I by several, with Hon. James H." Cas- sidy. of Cleveland, ns master of cerr- monies. Before sentence was passed then was a long colloquy between as to whose request it was upos which sentence had been so long de- ferred. The court wanted to know; Judge Kinkead said that he under? stood that both the state and the de- fense joined in it. Attorney General Hogan said that Diegle had voluntarily come to hiJ office after he had heard a capias was [out for him and intimated that ha 'would like to.-tell "the truth about the legislature" Not wishing to-go into the matter without the presents of the prosecutor, Mr. Hogan- asked the -colonel to call again when he would be glad te talk with him about the martter in the; proseetitdr'sj' pres- ence. When Diegie left a was .understopcT that. he. wooidt coma back but he never did: "Colonel Diegle did not use !confession' in his talk witb said Mr. Both Belcher attorneys for the indicted senators.- sought to impress the court in speeches that Diegle had never said to any one that he had anything else to farther than he had already given in Ma testimony in court, bearing on the charges of bribery against senators. Prosecuting Attorney Tnrner em- phatically denied that he had been 3 party to an agreement for a 30-daj postponement of action in Diegle's case. While such an entry had been. prepared by one of his assistants In his absence, he had not appro-red it when it was submitted to him and it was never put on the journal he" said. It is the intention of Bgan, Diegle'a attorney, to have one judge of the cir- THE DIEGLE CASE court accept the case and this j will hold the matter in its present con- oo dition until the 29-t- i nt expose of bri- scs on it wbich v be some time be- jfore the end of the year. Meantime MAY Diegle, Senat- will be out on bond. He has a ors Cetone, Huffman and An- chance for a reversal of tha drews and Representatives Nye ne.w trial- and Lowry indicted action this morning settles it JULY 3-Diegle convicted large- gSt- bellJ from ly by dictagraph evidence of Burns detectives. SEPT. alleged "con- tn fession" made a, to turn states evidence to secnre SEPT. 9-Diegle sentenced to prestD.re of three years in prison; sentence preveat !t- suspended to Sept. 18. Kinkead passed sen- ho took pains to sav emphatical- m the of MM in- dieted senators. It is the general h.bat WEis turn CINCINNATI. 0.. Sept. men were killed, one fatally injured and two others hurt when a wall on which they were working at the new Lambert, pastor of the Elmwood I pl-snt of tlie Corcoran Lamp company Congregational church, Providence. .Dr.. Lambert's appearance was a sur- prise as it had been announced that Edwin S. Straight, a former Baptist A'_____________. _ _ _ collansed today. The dead are He'i- rv W. Petering, contractor, and John Figman. stone mason. Dreier. stone mason, was fatally hurt. It is derminecl the wall. now a 'carpenter, would per- i Believed_ the recent heavy rains un- .form the ceremony. Upon tbp failure of-Straight to'appear Dr. Lambert brought in one of the Astor au- tomobiles after the ceremony was concluded Colonel Astor handed out a statement embodying his ideas on divorce and remarriage in which he said: "Now that the ceremony is over ;BSd we are happily married I am not in the difficulties with which divorce and remarriage lawa fcre to be surrounded. I sy.-npathize heartily with the most straight laced in most of their ideas, but believe re- marriage should be possible once as marriage is the happiest condition for the individual in the Tne wedding ceremony .was per- formed in the drawing room of the mansion which, had been literally packed with American "beauty roses, The bride was .-attired in .a pearl gray gown. Her mother "wore black and the other party beautifully attired. The bride was given ia her father while Vincent father's, RAVENNA, 0.. Sept. 9. up to Charles Ranally. one of a party of friends, Luigi Petrone is alleged to have thrown his arras about him as though to embrace him and then he chewed his nose to shreds. WILL REPL Y tenoe ly Knat he had made up his mind im- mediately after the motion for a new trial overruled what the sentence should he and he had not changed his mind since. Fe had not been in- financed by the renort of Diegle's ia- not rt C J 1 -rx Sandusky Demokrat. German i cess of the present republican Mayor Diegie was ready to appear in court at 9 a. m. and Mrs. Diegle had also arrived. There was intense i i v. i --tut J publication, whicn has been j i-ehrer are enhanced, but many dem- Mayor Alexander welcomed hailed in some quarters as the "or- iocrats are living in hopes tna't John the visitors to the island. 'gan-- of the ,o.a, democracv has bnlt. Holzaepfel, present able democrat- John J. Lentz, of Columbus, was the ed the nomination of William' T eitz who has announced! principal speaker at the celebration.'for mavor fieclarin- the chanreq as lnflePendent candidate for! banduskians on hand were speaks of "treachery" in such a wav (Continued on Page 2) ST. MARY'S. 0.. Sect. 9.- son of Charles on cars in the Ohio men. The inter-state commission quickly j "I shall make a n-ph- to the disposed of the Hayes plan of locating charges said Mr Satur- the Perry m'emorial at Green IslamP.y .day. after having read the i I deciding to accept the Put-in Bay site, i article published in Friday's jllie terms are yet to be finally ad-'' sue. "The rharse was to the Justed in respect to the amount the limit in tho primarjrs and we know commission will pay. although the the result. It is a little too earlv to owners of the property will receive brgin the oampaien." the amount awarded by the Ottawa! Friends of Leitz declared that his county jury, it developed that through statement when it -comes would be a me efforts of sizz'.er. The whole trouble, it is said.! an on the Part of j 6 Paul Miller and others to secure from i Leitz, prior to theelection two years ago. a statement favorable to Mayor i Molter. Leitz has claimed he was (threatened with political death if he did not make such a statement and so he refused to be bluffed, although denying he worked against Molter." The Demokrat said in its article, after giving. the results of the pri- maries: The result was not only surprising to the- conservative demo- crats but disconcerting, for it is hard- ly credible that a man. whose follow- m e Si Hoskins he'd get married al', right only his Kirl hez an im- pediment in her speech and she can't say "yes.'' Forecast: Cloudy tonlgbt and Sun- day. Not much change in tem- perature. Temperature at 7 a. m.. 67 degrees; Was Kidnaped last Tuesday From Room in Her Home and Killed. one year ago, 60. Sun rises Sunday a, m., and'. place. No clue has MADISON, Wis.. Sept body of Annie Leznberger, 7, gtojan from her home Tuesday night, WM found in Lake Monooft by George Yunger, a laborer. girl's head and shoulders were ly bruised. The finding of the body today feu left the police as far from a of the mystery as they Brst reports of the kidnspiiyr ago brought about the I sets at p. m.; rises Monday at would suggest whcTbroke the Cftt 
                            

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