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Sandusky Star Journal: Thursday, August 31, 1911 - Page 1

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - August 31, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        IMPORTANT QUESTS W.LL BE D.SCUSSEO AT TON.GHT'S MEET.NG OF THE ER.E COUNTY CONST.TUT.QNAL CONVENT.ON LEAGUE-TURN OUT- mE_SANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. PORTY-FOURTh FIRST EDITION SANDUSKY, OHIO, THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, i CRACK MARKSMEN OF MATCHES AT CAM Counsel Announces He Will Be Called As First Witness Friday Morning. TWO WITNESSES TELL OF LONE HIGHWAYMAN Defendant's Story Is Thus Cor- roborated and Lawyers for Accused Score Point, CHESTERFIELD COURT HOUSE, Va., Alig. 31.- The strongest card yet shown in de- fense of Henry Clay Beattie, jr., charged with the murder of his wife, was played today. Ernest H. Medlitt, paper mill superin- tendent, threw a bomb into the camp of the prosecution when he declared on the stand that on the Sunday night before the killing he saw Paul Beattie at his post as bridge watchman carrying a single barrel shot gun. Paul Beattie had insisted that he gave the gun to his cousin Henry, the accused man, on Saturday night Medlitt declared that on Sunday ev enmg he saw Paul Beattie standing i the doorway of a little building at the end of the bridge with a shot gun in his hand. "When he saw me he put the gun said Medlitt. Prosecutor Wen ccnburg was unable to shake Medlitt's f Curing recess the defense an nounced that Henry Beattie himself uke the stand in his own be- nair at. the opening of court tomorrow before the court convened to- CS..V it was settled definitely that Hen- 'T Clay Beattie would not plead in- sanity to escape the electric chair His c---ief counsel, Harry M. Smith, 'an- nounced that he was satisfied with the progress of the case and would not change his client's plan of defense VAST FORTUNE FROM DEAD FATHER See Effect of Lower Tax Rate Despite Fact That Values Are Trebied. TAX COLLECTION WILL BE HIGHER! Work of Apportioning Lumpj Valuation in Taxing Dis- tricts Now Coins; on, i David Weinstein. 17, son Pawnbroker of whom Paul of the 'Seattle he bought the gun was the flrst witness today. He told of selling the Pun to Paul, whom, he said told'him ne was a watchman.at natly denied having made that state, laent during his examination He contradicted Paul's statement that he had been to the pawn shoo only once before he bought the gun saying that the cousin of the accused man had visited the store several times before MT C5OSS examination Prosecutor A endenburg succeeded in confusing the boy badly and impeaching his en- tire story. During tne Jack Sheets, Young Wireless Operator, Flashes Distress Signals From Mast. RISKED Firemen Burned to Death and One Badly Scalded During. Hurricane Off Coast, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. Aug Jack Sheets, 16, who was on 'his va- ation, was instrumental in saving the assengers and crew of the steamer Lexington wrecked off the coast in the urncane of last Sunday night, which wept the coast of South Carolina Alter the- storm hacf COLUMBUS. 0.. August I YORK, Aug. the terms of the big railroads of Ohio are his Other's will, just made known mensely pleased today over the j "-ho A' amount of tax valuation despite the 'Chariest. fact that the roads were valued at Gates, is to receive' a vast for; over three times as much this year as Gildersleeve estimates that the elder last, because they will actually pay between and leas taxes as the result or the de- All" of this except a million dollar" crease in tax rates. j is bequeathed to Gates' widow and Although the total 1911 tax valua-! The remainder is divided into tion was compared with: bequests, the largest of for 1910, some of tte big Si'es to the son's recently di- vm-ced wife. She is at several hundred thousand II DIE Philip Cassidy, at County firmary, Unable to Conquer Enraged Animal, USED A PITCHFORK, WAS KNOCKED DOWN Rescued By Others After Being Trampled and Physicians Do' Not Expect Recovery, Attacked by an enraoad 'bull shortly before 5 o'clock Wednes- day sftemoon, Philip Cassidy, 71, bly 'S31? -inmat6' WSS racily injured. Superintend ent Rohrbachcr and other men at tne mnrmary rescued -him. While the night, '3ns do no Cassidy's misfortune was due it is railroads will pay less taxes as the tax rate will only be one per centji compared to three per cent for last The other bequests are w year. In actual taxes, however the' ncls and of Mr- Gates' old em- railroads will pay which D move than thev paid last: t L twenty-one years old. year. ;of St. Charles, III... only nephew of the Lake Shore railroad property which 5 Gates, will get was valued last year at. is from college, advanced in the present figures to given propertv i JT the bull, uus flas wholly tmnecessary driven in the cattle but "the deter- -Mrs. Lucerne a blind sister- while the Big Four prop-' Cf'eS' is left closelv allied to the Lake Shore Dolores len >'PRI'S Old. IS left in trust. T, examination Bwttie sat with bowed head on the table before him. He seems to have his debonaire manner which _ into tlie rigging and adjusted nis instruments, flashing the call for help. The boy was in imminet peril Oi his hfe while operating the vile- less, the gale almost tearing him from his insecure position. For some time he was an enthusias- tic amateur, operating a plant of his own at his home ,in Wyaaote a sub- urb. Recently he'passed an unusual- good examination at the Philadel- Phia yard' so interested in the boy tbey advised him to take nP mnrked his appearance earlier in the he applied "to a trial. earner m tne wireless school here after his school Job Weinstein, 14, a brother of na were over for the summer and vid, corroborated his brother's testi- to the Lexington on part but With Paul Beattie on certain points. Ernest F. Medlitt, superintendent in a psper mill, was next called and creat- of seeing Paul standing in the doorway of a Kquor house near the Mayo "bridge on the Sunday preceding the murder with a shot gun in his hand. Yester- During the fight of the steamer against the storm two firemen were burned to death and a thrid terribly scalded. First Officer Chamberlain a fracture of his right For twenty-four hours the ship battled desperately against the hur- of! a.ppareilt in the examination of the first witnesses for the dfifense e tle Case that the ricane, finally aground. Three was covered with prisoner f11? flrst storv of the hill- ing of his wife by the bearded high- Dayman. Two witnesess were intro- duced to prove that such a man as Henry Clay Beattie described was seen In the neighborhood. r Eugene Henshaw, a farmer of Bon 'Air, was asked to testify if he saw feny stranger on the road on the days Before or after the murder "Yes." "Was it a white or colored man'" asked Prosecutor "White man." had a grey beard ''Beard about two weeks old." the strange man have a 'Not when I saw him." The' witness was excused. "W R. Holland, a quarryman, said en the witness stand that he saw a Bearded man with a shotgun on the afternoon before the murder. 'Holland lives near the scene of the tragedy. "Do you remember seeing any per- son on the track of the Belt line at the time of the he was asked by Mr. Smith .for the defense Yes." being times the water, the driven vessel pumps it's time to get it out of yorir head. For our guardsmen can shoot. And it's shooting that counts in times of war. One of the gratifying features of the national rifle team matches held here was the demonstrated efficiency the National Guard marksmen from the various states. Sergeant C. M. King, of Waukon, Ta., a blacksmith hy trade, won the all round rifle shot championship of the United States in competition against men from the reg- ular army and marine scoring ihe highest total ever made for the title. The upper picture shows a National OW> Bebirxi CAMP PERRY, 0., Aug. you ever had the idea that our National Guard isn't good for anything except ;o march in parades and have a good erty. was increased from to ohp ,-0 ,oi The Nickel Plate went 'efene the to while the P., i b twenty-one years old. C., C. St. L.. was advanced from _. to The Wheeling and Lake Erie rail- road company WHS assessed at this yoar as against in 1910, an increase of The Lake Erie and Western railroad company, which was valued at when f ho rflA J tii ncu QL. n> J. t I I rd''ange' .After firing five 276 is raised to ?3.64I.OSO. an increase ward' Ca and ?f The Lakeside and Mar- waia a hundred yards, when they blehead railroad company was this uu, Llle> and fire again. This maneuver is repeated until they are within 200 yards of the this case the target. Then firing ceases i and a count of hits is made. The lower picture shows the mar- kers behind the butts on the firm- range. It was taken while firing was in progress. .On the right is seen the stone and concrete wall, backed by fourteen feet of earth, that protects the markers from flying bullets. On the left are the targets. These represent the out- lines of a man lying prone, the form being just visible over the wall to the marksmen outside the butts. As each shot strikes the target it is registered by the markers, the total hits being signaled at the end of the series of volleys. HELD H It year appraised at f...the. an in- SSS.'IoO, of last year. The Baltimore and Ohio Southwes- 1 tern railroad company was given an increase of "the total being! as asainst last i i i j Storck and Girl Bnde Bound Over to Grand Jury for Perjury. would not go to the barn bull Stubborn but be Just -as stMhhnrn stuboorn as Cassidy says he re- r attacked the animal. He had jabbed the bull three or four times when the animal, now thoroughly enrage him knocked down Cassidy was helpless. Having no tke mans as- sistance and Superintendent Rahr- also hurried out. The tetter Picked up a rock and drove the animal but just as he stooped over tha piostrate man, the bull returned to at, tl 6 superintendent- The pitca- this time proved a good weapon of defense and the animal was driven be camed to 859. The Sandusky, i SPITE Mansfield WORK IS ALLEGED ijcui.i ivas vaiuea i r> -r- .1 ease of ibomlicting I estimoiiy As to a vear o'li A i Girl's Age and Minister Ob- jected to Decision, WOMAN LECTURER CHALLENGES EDITOR TO DUEL BECAUS E OF SARCASTIC EDITORIAL PARIS, August Arris Ly, i As Cazale was absent, she sent two portions and float the stem. wind reached a velocity of 130 miles an hour. The steamer was held for hours in the grip of the hurricane, with Cap- tain Connally almost naked and half frozen standing at the wheel, while stokers worked desperately, standing to their armpits in water in an eflort to increase the steam pressure to en- able the vessel to steer away from the treacherous shore. a lecturer on woman's ri._ challenged to mortal combat (Cazale, an editor, who wrote a sar- castic editorial regarding the woman's personal appearance, when she deliver- Newark railroad company was valued i at an incn over the valuation of ago. Although it is under way. the work of apportioning this lump valuation to the various taxing districts which the property is located will uuu- sume a great, deal of time and the George Storck and his young bride commission will not be able to an-.'of two days, charged with perjurv tr J t single rill have to stay in the county jail for j at least a month unless someone goes on .their bond, according to the deci- sion of Squire Dietrich" who bound them over to the grand jury after the preliminary hearing which consumed in con- nounce the duplicate in any taxing district for some time. THINK AMERICAN HAS PAINTING MONA LISA morning, it win be about that time when the graud jurv mnorrt has women se rit v Demanding city but NEW YORK. Aug. Ameri- a native of a western fused to fight a woman. now in is sur- Mile. in a public letter called him a coward and said he was afraid ed an address recently advocating sin- j to meet her, because -he knew she was gle blessedness, upheld old maids and j an expert shot Massai has reolied ridiculed man. The editorial said i that he is willing to meet anv male she might be influenced in her views j friends of Mile. Ly's but won't fieht for lack of personal beauty. duels with women' Mile. Ly, who is an expert shot with Thus far no man has appeared as Mile. Ly's champion, but she won't pistols, wrote Prudent Massai, editor- government, co-operat- ing with the French authorities in the search for "Mona the mas- terpiece of Da Vinci which was stolen from the Louvre in Paris ten meets. And according to Attorney John Ray, there is no one to give bond, and thus insure the couple a happy honey- moon, instead of one that will mar their young lives forever. Storck, father of the boy, ar- rested on the same accusation It was found that Cassidy's right les had been broken between the knee and tip, his, left wrist had.beea several ribs had been fractured he had probably been internally in- jured. Dr. Busch, the infirmary pnys- ician. was out of the city: and Dr Chares Graefe was called. Dr. Busch. took charge of the case Thursday "This will not kill Cassidy marked Thursday. Nevertheless, the physicians hold out no hopes for his recovery. "There was no occasion forthe'maa attacking the said Superintend- ent Rohrbacher. "The animal would have been all right had he been left alone." Cassidy was admitted to the infirm- ary from Margaretta township about a year ago. He had worked on Ransom farm. WAS EXPECTING DETECTIVE Cashier in Hotel Alleged to Hare bczzled Daring Period of Twelve Tears. YORK. Aug. J. Dorian, 43. for twelve years cashier of the Hotel Manhattan, was ar- raigned on a charge of grand ago. daj.s swearing falsely that the girl was! i over IS years of age. was discharged! In handing down the i In default of bail he was 01! mitted to prison. This information came from _____. Hani Loeb. jr.. collector of the port of i decision- Justice Dietrich "safd "that TCpu." Vnrlr f hpro xvoo f _ _. v York. n in-chKf of the paper, saying she on let the affair rest. must J._ J> ___ i i ___ I l.onoi. wi p her life for !ler PrfnciPles and there was no testimony to show he thought he wa, rnakir." wont permit anyone to insult her. STAR-JOURNAL NEWS AND FEATURES TODAY monts as to the sirl's that It i Dorian is charged with the specifics of stealing but .Assist- strict Attorney told the amount of embezzlement would reach. i was clfar that he for the simple ing consent to the marriage to the of arrested while at cashier's office of the hotel oy i Detective Rnoney. Roonev HERE'S NEW DESIGN FOR THE PERRY MEMORIAL Candidate William Leitz an- son- his j Ian he had a warrant for his arrest. nounccs mayoralty platform. To say that the decision of the court -TOU'" Teachers' Institute sessions. ln not releasing the yoims: couple was design for Perry memorial. Popular with the c row cf that packed Crack shots at Camp Perry. tlie room, would be putting the Grounds Under Martial Law and Victim's Perform Men- ial Released. "When was 0, August Sl.-Martial to practical has been ve 'n tne afternoon just before the murder" j v "Did hp have aVreSted byt of the N- G" i "He had a single barreled ar? Pftrohng the grounds and ex- gun." of "No." "Would you know the man again if FO.U saw asked Prosecutor W endenburg. "Yes." "What kind of hair did he "Sandy beard. I didn't notice his bair." "Anyone with you when the man with the shotgun "Yes. but I don't know his name' the man with the "Yes." "Did you ever see him before? halls with shouldered rifles i snot- jbibit anything to hunt this time and _ perform menial chores about the j soldier's camp. Among those arrested today was Past- master H. Krumm who was halted by a guard as he was entering the ground in an auto carrying United States mail i and was mistreated. He was later1 released and appealed to Adjutant! The other! General C. C. Weybrecht. gun a "Once in Richmond, a year ago. at police station when I went to iden- tify some stolen brasses." Holland was then excused. (Continued on Page 2) NEWARK, 0., Aug. Perry Dav- is, indicted following the lynching of Detective Carl Etherington in the. 'dry" riots, was arrested as he was entering Hebron, aboard an interur- ban car. 18 culprits were sentenced without the y of civil procedure. McQuigg, in command of the guard at the fair denied that the grounds were under martial law He said they only took charge of persons guilty of minor offenses and made them do police duty. PBOXINEftT CATEREK DEAD 0.. Aug. Sl.-Michael Hannan, of the firm of Hannan Mc- Glade. caterers, known throughout this part of the state, died as the re- sult of a cold -contracted on an auto He was a native of Ireland and nad been in the catering business in Cleveland since 1854, starting in the old Weddell house. Infirmary inmate fatally injured oasf mildly. The Rev The--> T c St-! by enraged bull. horn of the Lutheran 1 Rev. W. A. Pugsley to resign as pastor of Baptist church. Latest developments of Beattie trial. f Complete local, teiegrahpic and "sporting news. the girl was a member could restrain his fer-lincs. After tl'o ronrt !'ad Mr. and Mrs Storck -in- der Sinn bonds each, he walked up to Dietrich and exclaim-d "T _... 'on Pa NEW FOR PERRY MEMORIAL Famous Architect Submits Plans to Commission Which Will Meet At Put-in Bay Next Week. !Rev. George H. Peeke to Re- ceive Share of Late Sis- ter's Estate. which hand- I Special to the Star-Journal, i CHICAGO, 111.. Aug. the will j of his last surviving sister, who died i at her home and whose funeral w_as held at this morning, tha Rev. George K. Peeke, 79, of Sandus- fcy. 0.. is bequeathed the sum of O00._ The money is to be invested and he is to have the income during his lifetime. At his death, the money will go to other heirs. Mrs. Sample, who was aged 82 H. Van Buren Magonigle. famous ar-i with akP tist and architect, who designed the some brid- McKmley National Memorial at Can-i j ton, has prepared a design Perry's Victory Memorial" ed at Put-in Bay, which mitted to the commissioners ai cneir, meeting in Cleveland and at Put-in Bnv days at PlUMn 'Ba-v- morning The body is beins next week. A previous design had1 the annual meeting of the' Amsterdam. N. Y.. for burial been submitted by John Eisenmann rys. Centennial commis-j of Cleveland. The commissioners will f'tV htkl at the bring-i make the selection. to'pttler there a number of dis-j THE WEATHER. Magonigie's design consists of ai th ,men who are fluted Grecian Doric column about' tederf' commission and of Forecast: Generally fair tonight nuuiu. e, f 300 feet in height, on the top of which state commissions. As was and Friday, warmer Friday. th is an open gallery, or platform, above which is an immense searchlight or revolving light, for the.use of mari- ners on the great lakes. is crowned by a figure representing "Victory." The column is flanked on each side by two buildings. Around the build-i ings are walJcs leading into the woods! and one which runs around a largej lagoon or lake, which csanected l> iiji JL.' t tne case at the annual meeting last Temperature at 7 a. m de- year, there will be dinners tendered! Srees- degrees. Sunrises Friday at v vv.jtuci the commissioners by the citizens of Put-m Bay, public speaking in the grove at the island and some "very. ___________ important business sessions by and sets at 6'0-t men who are to shape the affairs of the big 1913 celebration in comment- oration of the victory of Commodore Perry. Temperature one year ago, 72 a. m. p. m. (standard (Continued on Page; Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today. 2ft miles northeast at day afternoon. iNEWSPAPERl iNEWSPAPERl   

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