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Sandusky Star Journal: Thursday, August 24, 1911 - Page 1

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - August 24, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        BIG QUESTIONS WILL BE UP TO THE ERIE COUNTY CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION LEAGUE. TURN OUT FOR ELECTION OF OFFICERS TONIGHT. THE K STAR -FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 191 LAST EDITION my BEAU NUMBER 272, NO OF PAINTING WORTH MILLIONS, STOLEN FROM LOUYRE FRAME Prisoner Himself Picked Four of Sixteen Men to Be Dis- missed From Box. NOW TAKES GREATER INTEREST IN TRIAL Many' Witnesses Summoned and Testimony Begins Aft- er Statements Are Made, THE BEATTIE JURY. V ______ No. W. Farley, 37, quar- ryman. No. L. Wilson, 38, farm- er. No. L. Fetteroff, 34, con- tractor. No. L. Bass, jr, 30, Y farmer. No. W. Fuqua, 27, farmer. No. L. Burgess, 52, farm- er. No. E. Purdie, 27, farmer. No. C. Robinson, 44, farm- er. No. A. Hancock, 37, farmer No. Lewis Oberston, 44, farmer. No. P. Rooks, 48, farm- er. No E Blankenship, 3S, superintendent of a silk mill V ft CHESTERFIELD COURT HOUSE, August The- fight for the life of Hrnry Claj Scuttle, Jr, began in real ca-i pst when the ston of Seattle's weird midnight auto ride, with the blood diipping body of his dead wife ai-TOss his lap. was lelated by Thomas E. Owen, uncle of the murc'ered woman to whose home the body wag taken Beattie attenthe, quiet anrl interest- ed :n a more serious mood than usaal Not even the sight of the blood- soaked garments that Beattie wore the right of the killing disturbed the prisoner's calm, but be ej ed Owen throughout the testimony with, serious interest. Owen related about the starting of mo n inn! rilo mbm SEEING IS BELIEVING} GUERIN PROGRESSIVE, Says He Will Resume Journey of 28 Miles to Governor's Island Friday. ATWOOD CONFIDENT OF REACHING GOAL Well Known Attorney, After Trip Through Oregon, Declares ton Initiative and Referendum. Recall, Woman Suffrage, Singie Tax and Home Rule For Cities. Have Traveled 1265 Miles When He Alights in New York Fticlay, LISA. op stolen the famous portrait of a 000.000 for it. dTetectives scouring France for the Mona Lisa, a painting in Paris, are no nearer a solution of the painting was the world's most T Louvre gallery woman The British government had offered Seattle and his wife on the iatal drive anr the leturn of Beattie with the dead body of his wife huddled in the bottom of the auto have killed Says Wife Left Him to Go on Stage and Names Young the NEW YORK, N. Y., Aug. Sinclair, the novelist and socialist, sent a statement to the newspapers that his wife had lett him to go on "Oh, My God! j the stage, and he intends to bring a j divorce suit at once, naming a young western poet, who recently was a vis- itor at the Sinclair summer home at Arden, Dol. In his statement he said that his Beattif- moaned when he rushed up to the machine A ghabtlv recital of the conditions of the murdered woman's bod> then followed' He then identified the blood soaked clothing; Beattie wore and the shot gun Paul Beattie said he purchaser! lor his cousin Seattle on- ly stared at tho witness as the gruesome relics of the tragedy were exhibited. Owon declared Bcpttie was I to this citv from Arden, Del The could be found in this city at tae home of hei father. He declared ha nad had a stormy interview with her there_ this week alter following her not greatlj excited and that o loolr no part in the seauh for the assassin. He told of Bcattio's explanation of the appearance of the "tall, dark bearded liighwaiman Owen said Beattie was some- where on__the roa'l between his father's house and the Owen home on the night of the nnmler for an hour that cannot bp accounted for Beattie explained, Owen said, that he had punctured a tire anrl repaired it Harry M Smith, for the defense, tried to get Owen to contradict him- self on minor details but without suc- cess The antagonism of the Owen familv toward the prisoner cropped out in Owen's cross examination. _ The Beattie iury was secured at a late hour Wednesday afternoon and Beattie and his counsel had a confer- ence of 20 minutes which bis father (Continued on Page 6 a- Eddie Guerin Tried Once to Sel an Imitation of Art Treas- ure, "Mona Lisa." be partment is on the second floor of a flat biiildmg on West STth stieet. It was dark and persistent hell-ringing and rapping failed' to bring any re- sponse. BEATTIE'S COUSIN HELD AS WITNESS Young Florist Chokes Man Who Held Up Young Lady and Himself With Revolver. MANSFIELD. 0 Aug. high- wavman who was identified as Charles Dolford. of Mt. Vernon, was choked to death after he had held up and tried" to rob Walter Clover, a florist, living near Belleville. Clover and Miss Hortense Sharer, daughter of Albert Shafer, an under- taker of Belleville, both in attendance at the county teachers' institute, were seated in the noith end of Sherman- heieman Park, at the western city litnits. when the robber confronted them with a revolver and ordered them to accompany him across the adjacent railroad tracks Under threat of death, they com- plied, fearing to make an outcry, but when their assailant was momentar- ily off his suard, after he had com- pelled his v'ctims to lie down upon (he ground, joting Clover seized a clod of earth and struck the partially blinding PARIS. August life in this city as to what has come of Eddie Guerin and the ques tion is being asked, "has the king of crooks turned the biggest trick the un- derworld has known in a century' A field for speculation of absorbing inteiest was opened with regard to the disappearance of Leonarda da Tinea's masterpiece, "Mona for which is said to have been refused Louis Lepine. the prefect of police today frankly admitted complete mys- tification m the case of the theft of "The Mysterious Lady of the Louvre and called attention to the story of Guerin as associated with the most famous painting in Paris. The story, as the prefect knows it, follows: Shortly after Pad Sheedy had "got away" with some valuable paintings in Europe, to be disposed of to Ameri- can millionaires. Edde Guerin con- the idea nf a "thimble game of which the "Mona Lisa" was the pea. He had in mind a scheme-of having da Vinca's picture copied and of foisting the copy on the pretext that it was original and had been stolen off on a Philadelphia mul- timillionaire. With this purpose in view. Guerin had a young artist make a copy of the famous work. By of Canada, Guerin smuggled the copy into Ameri- ca It is now in New York. Negotiations with the Philadelphian dragged out, and finally came to a full halt The Quaker Cih man doubted its and for no hp asserted would he a million" dol- lars, the price Gtienn demanded So Guerin who had all along antic- ipated this set new ma- chinery in motion. He went one af- feinoon to the Salon Carre, where the "Mona Lisa" hung. Shorth aftpr arrival there, the mysterious bomb explosion cf last August 7 occurred in the yard of the Louvre The salon was immediately emptied of everyone except Guerin By aid of a powerful magnifying glass and a strong elec- tric pocke't igniter, he focused "an in- tense light in a certain portion of the canvas and materially affected principally as to color He then took a cbk'el, loosened the bark of the fiame. and pressed the glass free in fiont. That was all He then left as he had come in. But the Philadelphia millionaire had mafte his dollars shrewdly and had to be shown. Guerin could not quite con- him New the that the painl- actually vanished Has-1 Guerin undertaker, to "deliver the gocds" beyond question' The an- swer can only be conjectuiPd. but the kncwiedse of Guenn's ambitions in legard to the ''Mcna Lisa" has re- ceived attention. Officially, Eddie Guerin is dead. He is the only man who escaped from Devil's Island, where Capt. Dreyfus so long was confined in a steel cage. LWACK, X. Y. Aug es-. tabhshmg a new world's cross-country! flying recoid Aviatoi itwood, on thej last stage of his journey from St. Louis to New York, was forced to gne up his alterant to complete his journey today because ot an acc1- dent to his motor. After landing on Hook's Mountain Atwood came to this city with pieces of his motor, which he said he must have repaired I before he could resume his flight. He! said he doubted it he could reach! New York before tomorrow. Atwcod declared his engine commenced miss- ing when opposite here. He stopped it above an open field and volplaned to the ground Atvvood's time after flj ing from Cas- tleton to Hook mountain today was two hours and 33 minutes. From St Louis to thrs point he had been in the air 27 hours, 41 minutes. His flight to this village makes miles, a new world's record. He has 28- mile- to go to Governor's Island, increasing his total 1.268 miles. Atwood ascend- ed at Castleton at a. m. When Harry N. Atwood landed at Castleton on his way to New York he- came down in an apple orchard as a place for his biplane. Although he had detoured around towns in his day's run to avoid crowds, the own- er of the apple orchard was not pleased to see him. He resented the arrival of the "man bird" and said so vigorously. Meantime, all the folk in the countrv-side rushed into the orchard When they got tired of looking at the Atwood machine they applied themselves to eating the apples. At Echirninar from an extended trip through Orcirou. the "experiment station" of the countrj in progres- sive Koirrnnieiit. and through the Canadian northwest, where the) have adopted the single YK E. (iuerin, jr., well-known local at- toinoj and former saietj director, and regarded a mild has come out openlj for the most advanced progressive !'i' of government, including the initiative and referendum, the re- call, even of judges, home rule for cities the Miisrle tax on real estate iiiui an income the strict lie" ens-ing of and district, not local option, and, finally, woman suffrage. Mr. {Juerin was a mesibrr of the code committee of the legislature in 19C2 and as such was largel} re- sponsible for the present so-called municipal code. He has been termed a corporation Driver. Af- ter sev eral ears' residence in Or- egon at the time the new experi- ments were first being tried, he returned to Saudusky, unalterably opposed to the new His recent visit, he says, convinced him that the uevv systems are a success and so he co into the fight to haie them adopted In the new Ohio constitution. Observa- tion at first hand has, it may be Miid, concerted him. Refusing to be considered a candidate for delegate to the constitutional eon- lentiou, he will, he says, g-o into the fight to have progressive maesures. adopted. To the .Star- Journal he gave a statement, outlining his views, a statement that will be of special interest to members of the new- Erie County Constitutional Con- mention league, and to all citizens: nightfall the orchard had been pretty well stripped and the farmer was compiling a bill which, he says, he will present to the aviator. After hitching his machine to an appe tree, Atwood's mechanics began to adjust the bearings of the biplane which had become slightly worn. Atwood took a straight course down the Hudson river, flying over or near Kingston, Poughkeepsle, Fishkill, Newburgh and Ossining. His appearance over Rhinecliff marked his breaking the world's record for cross-countrj flying by thirteen miles the present record of 1.174 miles. PRESIDENT DIAZ HAS RESIGNED IS REPORT By IV. E. Guerin, Jr. _I had the opportunity to learn con- siderable about the results obtained through the operation of the initiative, referendum, recall, single tax, etc. Most of these theories have now been in practical operation for such period of time as to demonstrate the weak- ness of each and to place them beyond the experimental stage. I have always favored the referendum but have been seriously opposed to the initiative. The objectionable feature of that, however, can be easily provided against. It has been too easy to initiate legislation and to secure the passage of anything which might tend toward class legis- lation. Mj remedy for this defect would he that all petitions for mitia- Members Under IndictmentSaiS to Be Following His Move- ments Closely. PROSECUTION FOR LIMIT SENTENCE This Come in Case Diegle Remains Firm in Refusing to Make Confession, COLUMBUS, 0 Aug. 24-These art days tor many members of the Mvent g-neiai assembly, and a num- ber of the-n will be on the anxious unt.l afre, the confession if it tomes, of Rodaev J. Diegle, former Looks Like Only Way to Get New High School, Says Board Members. NEW ORLEANS, Aus is re ported here that President Diaz of Nicaragua has resigned his office Confirmation is not available but the information leads to a fear that the executive action has thrown-the couii- try-hrttrarstate of disorder. TEN BELIEVED LOST WHEN TUG GOES DOWN BYNG INLET, Aug. :he singing of the barge Albatross, of Midland, in a storm in Georgian Bay on Monday night, it is believed the ue C C Mai tin was dragged down md that Captain Vent, of Midland, is wife and eight men were all rowned News of the accident reach- d here today. SEVEN WERE INJURED WHEN FURNACE SLIPS YOUNGSTOWN, 0., Aug. slip were Many believe Paul Beattie, cous'n ______________. ,of Henry Clay Beattie. accused wife1 of the funure when seven men WC1C around tue murderer, will '.ecome a morj? Imuort-; cleaning out the cinder monkev Sn a neck with both hands and figure in the trial at Richmond mill at the Youngstown Sneet and him tn when; before it is Concluded. Paul 1S held Tube company in East Youngstown r him to s assistance good effect that came in to as a witness! in charge b; identified. 21 undertaker until [the one !n to Fhow lie w.v.-not thriving in a heap in the bottom of the used it to kill Mrs.1 Eeatlia. fit.______ 4 ATWOOD'S PROGRESS Miles. a. St. Louis. p. Chica- go. 300 p. Chicago. p. Elk- hart. 401 a. Elkhart. p. in To- ledo. 521 p. Toledo. p. at fair grounds. 574 p. Sandusky. p. at Eu- clid Beach. p. Cleveland. p. at Swarwille, Pa. 727 a. Swan- ville. p. Buffalo 826 3.20 p. Buffalo. p. Lyons. 930 p. Lyons. p. Belle isle. p. Belie isle. p. Fort Plain. 1.065 Port Plain a. Castle- ton. a. Cattleton, a. Hook Mountain. 1240 The new Erie County Constitn- tional Convention league will be formally organized at the court house Thursday evening, at Members will be enrolled and of- fleers elected. A large attendance is expected. tive, referendum, recall and direct pri- mary, be left with some public officer at a public office, and each person de- siring to sign the same be compelled to go to such office and sign in the presence of a city official. The per- centage of voters required to sign any petition should be not less than 25 per cent It should be made an offense to promise, directly or indrrectly, any- thing of value to any person to sign any such petition. I believe the new constitution should make possible the election of (Continued on Eight) Condemnation proceedings to com- >el the sale of the property of the Salem Evangelical church" in order to make room for the proposed new high school building are liable to be brought at any moment. "Negotiations the church for the purchase of its land and build school have been said one of the members of the board of educa- tion Friday morning. "We are so far apart as to the right price, that there is no chance ing near the high practically broken of coming together, unless public sentiment compels the sale of the property at a reasonable figure." Members of the board say that a location in the same block with the old building is the only possible on? for a new structure, as it is desired to make the old one an annex to the new. To abandon the present building entirely, and buy distant sejgtant-ar-aims of the senate is pub- lished to the world, or they have been assured that none is coming. There rs still conbideraole conjee- to Just what Diegle will say j and there still remains serious doubts as to whether or not he will reattj> make a confession. It is pretty hard to get this into the minds of many who know Diegl? and think that he will change his mind before he com- pletes his work. Attorney General aud Presenting Attorney Tur- ner are in doubt as to Diegle. Nelth- e'" them hesitate to say however, that he must or te no" mercy extended to him when it cornea to invoking the sentence of the court Aupinevd for other indicted senators and representatives have been kept uusy trjing to keep track of Diegle lately, and the state's attorneys have been just as busy, making Diegle alto- gether a v-erj much watched man. It is said that the confession is part- ly in typewritten form already, but as to this report no one has been: round who can confirm it. Until it is given publication there will be the greatest interest manifested In it If Diegle meant what he said in his statement given out at Columbus oa Thursday there seems to be nothing for him but a term in the penitentiary and it is probable that it will September 9. Judge Kinkead has al- ready left on his vacation and them is no chance of his coming soon- er. If Attorney General Hogaa and Prosecutor Turaei made good tfcelf implied threat that unless Diegle makes a complete and full confession, the senate officer wiH doubtless he given the limit of the law's penalty lOr brlbei'V---fiVP in Hin nanUnnJ five years in the peniten- land for a new structure would mean outlay of more than dollars, according to an additional fifty thousand members of the board. Talk about erecting a new structure to relieve the crowded conditions in the present building has been on for several years. School board was while he was lor bribery- tiary. Both Attorney General Hogaa and Prosecutor Turner are surprised at Diegle's action. They believed after the 'conference with Diegle that the latter would make such a statement as they wished. Evidently they taterpreteol Diegle's declaration that he is willing to "tell all he knows" and to tell the fruth, as meaning that he would maka a full confession substantiating tha evidence upon which he was convict- ed and upon which the state's prose- cutors expect to convict Andrews, Huffman. Cetone, Nye and Lowry. Now it develops that what Diegle members, however, say they are in earnest now, and that the action of tho church authorities and their rcn resentatives obstacle to ment. still stand as the suggested the only improve- to tell everything, he knows worth telling. THRETDIEINWTErFtRE WEARS POSY, PUFFS CIGAR, AS HE FLIES Telling of ROBBED DIAMOND MERCHANT LONDON. Aug. Hopton. dia- mond merchant, was today robbed ot worth of gems in a taxicab m one of thp most daring holdups in London in three thieves Falling Walls Crushed Out tires Employes lino Were Trying to Escape. escaped, but it Is'" expected thej be captured before night. FOUR KILLED IN MINE FIRE; FOUR INJURED, ALLY. Nfv.. are Known to be dead asp ous.lv injured and two unpins to- daj as the result of a fiif in the new- si .iff of Girmrf Consolidated mines, which started late last nisht PAJRKERSBURG, W. Va., Aug. 24. persons were killed, one boy was fatally hurt and several others were injured as a result of a fire and explosion which damaged the Chan-- cellor hotel. The tire, which threatened to spread thiough the business section of the city, started in the laundry room oa tpp seventh floor ot the hotel. When discovered the bloze had gained con- siderable headway. Many spectators flocked to the sctne. In the midst of the fire, thete was a terrific explo- sion Escaping gas ignited in tho room on the seventh floor, and the east wa'l in that story col- Tu lapsed. The falling debris demol- i> iHttt a one-story brick building oc- MEMPHIS, Tenn, Aug. ctipied bv Dr. S. H. W''se It was thousand shop omnlavrs of the that the spectators were canght, nois Central railroad, members of The bodies of the three victims were newly formed svstem voted to strike un'ess tb ficers recosmze the federation before Mondaj. Aua. 2S The result ot tlv secret vote was announced e-triy to- day Leaders declare that arrange-i mpnts aro complete for a walkout of all branches cf bervke -ration, haxejnot recovered until nisht of- The moperU damage to the hotel and doctor's office was NEW SQUARE DEAL CH B CHARTON 0 Aus Sqin.e Deal Club, designed to rioiiote a in depaitnient of Amei- can was organized ai the of the mediation convention teing hpld on the fnrre et K Tur- nei with delegates fiom all the -ountry. E C Ashbaugh was ebcted presi- dent Addresses were made M A G and Mrs. Anna Tucker of he Tucker School of Expression, of She spoke on ''Industiial Mediation.' deid and rnjured are: Floyd Smiih, U, son of a police ca) tain George Washington, 22. ne- gro, employed at the hotel. Harry Hall negro, bellboy. Daws. 15; crushed: will die Chester Kraft, merchant; head cut and body crubhed; will re- eov er THE WEATHER. tonight, Son Who Gave Alarm is Under Arrest at Bconvilie Suspect- ed of Crime. The photographer caught Harry At j wood, just after alighting at Lyons, N Y., describing his journey the air. He was just as spick span as when he left Si. Louis on the first lap of bis lung trip, tv miles, northeast at Thurs- to the cigar in his mouth Ttnd morning _ carnation on his lapei. r it vv Forecast: Friday fair. Temperature at 7 a. m.. 62 de- EVANSVILLB. Ind., Aug. sreas. bodies oC Samuel Lee, his wife It Temperature one year ago. 74 j year_ old sou, with their degrees. open" and nearly consumed by Sun rises Friday at a. m. were found today by firemen who and sets at p. m., (standard j sponded to an alarm at the t.fe time.) Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today twen- in Rooneville. Within a few boon William Lee, 21, son of Lee, wiw ar- rested charged with theif m order. Youne Lee told the police awakened by smell of called the fire department. SPAPFRf fSPAPERI   

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