Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Sandusky Star Journal: Saturday, August 19, 1911 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - August 19, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        :3t -f TODAY'SflEWSTODAY I THE HOME PAPER THE SANDUSKY STAR -JOURNAL. cnRTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 191 LAST EDfTfON NUMBER 268, ARMY GUARDS AND BIG STRIKE Women of London Won a Victory and Will Return to Strike Has Crippled Transporta- tion Throughout Great Britain. HERE IS BEST PICTURE OF AVIATOR ATWOOD LANDING LIVERPOOL, Aug power is cut off in this city today. Most places of business aie closed and fan.ine conditions prevail The death, rate is increasing alarmingly. The bteneh of uncollected garbage is hor- rible and unless some quick action is taken disease will add its horrors to those of the strike. The mob spirit was partialy quelled early The streets wie filled with soldiers and on the water front with add'uonal marines con- Jitions grow vv orse. The tood supply is growing lower and hunger is driv-1 tog thousands to desperation. Memb ers of parliament sent here to investi- gate today tried to make an agreement with the strikers and ship owners whereby food could be brought into me city to relieve the suffering. The danger of pestilence is growing hourly. Outlook Optimistic, LONDON, August his report to the government todav Chancellor Lloyd George following a conference With strike leadeis and lailway em-, plojres this said that the' outlook is ino-at optimistic bince the strike order was Issued. Several thousand Americans detain- ed hare by the st'ike today asked the men on the White Star liner Celti; struck today tying up that boat and and the Lusitania is unable to coal. It is predicted no boat will be able to leave until after the strike is settled. The home office issued the following statement today: There is tranquil- ity in the London district Tl e tunn seivice is, somewhat reduced but there is no dirth ot supplies in London or Lheipool" The statement that food suplies are being moved is, however, denied by -strike ton? don Times said toJaj. "It is a mis- steamship office to arrange passage for them on the France and German liners Many are at Southampton. The tourists were caught with little monev and suffer much inconvenience The two boats sailing todav weie take to minimize the gravity of the sit- crowded to their capacity. The fire- uauon vvnich is tar more FOHOUS than anything that has previously occurred in the histoij of indiy.tnal troubles m this country T H Thomas, member "of parhment, and one of the strike leadeis, said to- one quarter ot a million men have struck and' this number was be- ing constantly augmented" Scotland is cut off from London by lail and mail service throughout the United Kingdom AS suffering severely. The government expects to have troops to Mouse and Senate Both Clear Legislative Wheel After Democratic Defeat. WARM DEBATE OVER TARIFF House Will Pass Compromise Statehood Bill Monday and Take Up Cotton, took food to the Isle of Man- Fire_oh Mob. ADERAYRGN, Aug. 19- A desperate fight followed an attempt of striken; today to call out the rail- way men heie The-police and mill- far y-i'epetffMry-eMrri'd "the "crowd and were finally compslled to fire before the rioters dispeiserl The casualties are heavy and several of the injured may die. Women-Win Strike. WASHINGTON, August LONDON, Augr thous- ita legislative wheel practically clear women-factory strikeis who have ooagress today prepared for adgourn- ment bj Tuesday or Wednesda) CITY WINS VICTORY OVER LAKE SHORE Company Accepts Ordinance Which Will Save in Eliminating Three Dangerous Grade Cross- Can Be Laid As forecasted in the Star-Journal, the Lake Shore railroad Saturday morning accepted tfie giade ciossing ordinances passed by the council about a month ago Tne communication, conveung this news was. leceived by Auditor Loth Satin day, which was the last Of the thirtv g.anted to the torporatioa to agiee to the terms imposed by the city. The acceptance of the ordinances by the railroad makes it possible for the city council to submit to the people the question of issuing bonds for the payment of the uty's share of the work. Just how soon this will be done depends on the state of the city's finances, to a large extent ATWOOD COMING TO EARTH AT CLEVELAND. The acceptance of the Lake Shore is that is. there is not the slightest hitch attached to the same City Solicitor Stelnemann in- "isted Saturday mornins that the'e not even an undei standing with Attornev Hardy, of the road, that the two minor changes requested railier in the week, would be gt anted These weie the ten foot reduction of the width of Huntington avenue east from Hancrck itieet to Cleveland avenue, and the correction of an en or in stat- ing the height of the over Tif- fin avenue There is little doubt, however, that these piovisions will be 'nserted m the oidmances to accom- modate the- lailiuad uei Are not even of minor importance to the city The action of the corporation marks the lose of a long and animated con- troversy of seveial months' standing times it looked a? if the negotia- tions! would be at a standstill, but the Lake Shoie, after making concession after concession, finally leached the point where it could join hands with t're citj official? It is estimated that the insistence of the city fathers that the Lake Shore pav seventy-five per cent of the cost Air Tourist Atwood Landed at Erie After Exhausting Flight. FIRST ATTEMPT FAILURE Waited Until Crowd Left and Then Tried .Again Is Ahead of Schedule. ERIE, Pa., Aug. bucking ijti tciit yj cue v -.-I i of eliminating dangerous, sjrade cross- nmds aT1Q Dangerous air ings at Columbus ard Havet> avenues nd Campbell stiect will save the city! of the pioposed impiovements, nd at! for 12 miles in his flight from Fair- view where he arose at Avi- Atwood, in his journey from St. landed here at flist objected to doing any j thorough 1: exhausted Atwoodt naxt week In the house the cotton tariff revision bill and the compro- mise bill admitting Arizona and New strike Most of the firms involved 01 granted increased wages and recogni- most but they PUBLICITY A LAW. WASHINGTON, Aug. 19 dent Taft today signed the cam- paign publicity bill providing lor the complete publicity of cam- paign expenditures of candidates for the house and senate before election making the measure a law. The bill also limits the amount that each can spend in a i "Single campaign to for a candidate for the house and 000 for a candidate tor the senate tion of the union The the women strikeis was of them facing starvation held out heroically until the last With practically even mile of rail- way and all terminals guarded by English soldiers scores of thousands of railway employes throughout the United Kingdom went on strike condition of Big Ocean Liner Carrying 250 mtifnl Tnrtcjfr J Passengers Endangered By Flames Off Cape Cod. (Continued on Page 6.) Mexico to statehood alone remain for ftction. The cottoti bill will be called Up Monday for action. The senate nothing to d'o today wait oh the house The democrats were defeated in their efforts to pass over the veto President Taft the wool and free list bills. The democratic house majority, with ft great demonstration of enthusiasm, J Marshaled its ranks for the great bat- 110 to override the piesidcnt and went with flying colois The party! failed to muster enough in- fetirgent republican support to pass the tariff legislation ovei the president's head. I On the motion to pass the measure i Over the veto there were 227 affirma- tive votes, 22 of them insurgent repub- licans andi 1 independent republican, the negative votes were 129 motion to override the veto on the free list failed of a two-thirds iriftjority also, the vote being 226 to 127. Speaker Clark was siven an ovation from both sides of the house when lie left the chair and took the floor to end the discussion. The climax of his address was reached when he wild: "The president has a right to veto this bill, if he wants to 1 am not quarreling with him. I am lamenting his lack of wisdom as his personal friend! He has raised an issue that will rage with unabated fpry until the close of the polls in November. 1912." This was the signal for such an out- burst as seltfym has been known in the halls of congress. After the vote on the wool bill the president's message vetoing the far- mer's free list bill was read Under- wood mover that the bill be passed over the veto. Twenty minutes dis- cussion was led by Payne and Under- wood and the roll was called. The bill was lost by 226 ayes to 127 nays, much less than the neeessarj two- thirds majority. In his veto message, the president said: "First, because it should not be considered until the tariff Imrd shall" taake report upon the schedules it afreets; second, because the bill is so loosely drawn as to involve the goT-. efument in endless litigation and to leave the commercial community tn disastrous doubt- third, because it places the finished product on the free list but retains on the dutiable list the raw matprliil and the machinery with on Page i STRIKE FACTS LONDON. NEW YORK, Aug. broke and out in the boiler room of the steamship Massachusetts before it reached'New I York from Boston hut it was flnallj J extinguished without difficulty. Pas- sengers were thrown into panic which I resulted in some injuries. The flrf I was discovered as the ship Strike has practically paralyzed traffic on railroads. Railroad employes out, estimated Carmen on strike, Transportation workers, dockers, coal porters, Women union strikers, Teamsters, LIVERPOOL. Dockers, lightermen, freighters, locked out, 28.000. Carmen, Scavengers, carters, porters and other workers, Total, The number which may be In- volved is The government has taken a neutral position but will operate trains. The employes have demanded a general increase of 50 cents per week, a work week of 54 hours and recognition of the unions. THE WEATHER. Forecast' Showers late tonight or on Sunday, slightly warmer Sunday Temperature at 7 a. m., 65 de- grees Tmperature one year ago, 69 de- grees. Sun rises Sunday at a. m. v and sets at a. m.; rises Mon- day at 4'47 a m. and sets p. m. (standard Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon todaj, 16 miles northeast at Friday evening Total for Erie County Boosted CulJom will return to Chicago it is declared, to patch up to More Than hls made an unsuccessful attempt to reach this city at 10 4x but was forced 10 alight again at Pairview because of the strong wind. He stated that he would not try to go any farther today. He said he nev- j er encountered worse air currents. At- j wood Js away ahead of his schedule I having covered 739 miles and" being j only 526 from New York, At- i wood told spectators at Pairview after 10 i his unsuccessful attempt that ae would CHICAGO, August 19.-Accordmg to not atlempr to reach Ene until taia i evening. When they left he climbed into his, machine and ascended.. actual flving time from St. Louis IS 13 hours and 22 minutes. Atwood left Cleveland at moie The passage of the ordinance and its acceptance by the railroad company means that in a few the three most dangerous grade crossings in the city will be eliminated. The fight for this civic need has been waged unceas- ?cglv by the Star-Journal and others, and has finally borne fruit WAMS TO KETA13T SEAT political dope here Sen Shelb> Cullom slated tor retirement because of ill health, is not only not going to retire but is going to make a hard' fight to letain his seat in the senate. Sen- i Cape Cod lightship. I Two battleships and a number ot j other vessels responded to the wire- less call, but by the time they reached the Massachusetts the fire was under control and Capt. Snow refused offers of assistance. A vivid story of the wild scenes of excitement which followed the sound- ing of the fire signal on board was told by Miss Martha Guntenberg of Chicago, who was returning to her home after an extended tour through i Canada Miss Gunterberg was at, i companied by a friend, Miss Minnie Watatman "Man> of the passengers were in the dinins room and there was a wild rush for the decks. It was ter- ported rible the wav the men fought uitti the women. Why, we even saw some of the men grab life preservers from the hands of the terrified women. Children were torn from their parents and their ciies added greatly to the excitement. Big Pension Measure Reported Favorably By House Com- mittee Saturday. STAR-JOUiRNAL BUREAU Munsey Building. WASHINGTON. 18 sentative Sherwood, cbairimn of the invalid pensions committee, todaj ie-i By Commission. Special to The Star-Join na' COLUMBUS, 0, Aug. tax value of the banks of Eue Bounty wab almost doubled, toddy, bv the state tax commission The total for all the banks was put down at The total last yeai was This will aid materially in boosting the personal tax retuins for the count) and will also gieat- ly inciease the total tax value tor the county. MEMBERS NEARLY MET IN FISTIC ENCOUNTER the house tne ommend- i that the I Aug a verbal clash between Representatives Ruck and Boohej, both of Missouri, blovvi on the floor but Renre- vie? bill with U ation of the committee pass It will carrv the first j Rucker's speech on the bill' vear The bill was placed on the cal- endar and will be taken up at the noxt session of congiess and is hkelv to be renewed before the session ends ATWOOD'S PROGRESS Miles. a. St. Louis. p. Chica- go. 300 p Chicago. 0j Elk- hartr a Elkhart. p. in To- ledo. 521 p. Toledo. p. at fair grounds. 574 p. Sandusky. p. at Eu- clid Beach. p. Cleveland. p. at Swanville, Pa. 727 SATURDAY- TOMS s. Swsn- ville. p. at Erie. 739 MOUNTED POLICEMEN CLEARWAY FOR PARADE OF STRIKING DOCK WORKERS THROUGH CONGESTED STREETS OF LONDON'S EAST SIDE PLAN TO SEND THREE BOYS TO STATE FAIR dav afternoon and at 'clock land- ed in a cornfield a mile or so west oC Swanville, ten miles from Erie. came down so unexpectedly on farm of John Strucher that a cow Strncher was'dnving to the banr tot the evening milking jumped a fenea in fright, took to the woods, and up a late hour had not been found. The first aeroplane tourist of AmerU ca, whose unique trip now- holds the attention of the whole country, dropped into this rural neighborhood almost as a visitor from Mara. It was (he first aeroplane ever seen there. The failure of Erie to nients for Atwood's arrival there was? one reason he decided to stop this side of the city. And besides, he need- I ed iest. and chose to spend the night in the quiet cf the country and es- cape the ovation he knew "would waiting for him bevoiid. Even in Ma sleep At wood heais the throbbing of his engine ami the strain is telling on, him The aeionlane was trundled out of the cornfield to the shelter of spreading and two farm hands, Charles and Raymond Fisher, were to watch it over night, Atv.cod ate supnei at a neai-by farm; hc-u" and ananged to remain until th's nioin'TS As the aeroplane was the first to he seen 'n the o! Swatmlle, so Atwood was the fust aeroplane dnver He stepped fiom the bird machine in the corn field m as spick and span siiape as he arrived in Cleve- land, and more ard span than it he had aruved in Swanville by either train automobile For the sky route is free both of road dust and lo- comotivp cinders He wore the rain- coat he haf' purchased m Sandusky. SPTI gntheiec it having first been icporttd that the machine turtle. Fred Mixter, of Milan, Chosen By Commission on Twentieth iHIT AT RAILWAY CROSSING I________ Ballot After Exciting Contest Roliin Steen and Lynndon Sciieid May Go. Father and Mother Instantly Killed While Driving in Auto With Two Children. Fred C i Madison Vixter. ot Milan. son oil There weie fiftf-en accredited repre-' MJDDLETOWN X Y 4ug b- Erie KHjntj-b bentatives ar the meeting h-re which One of the worst aniomob'ileaccidecta jrepiesf-mauvp the attend- was- (ailed to order at o'clock by that ev-r took place in Oran-e countv I ing the Ohio State Fair at Columbus. Count) Comnnssionei Dave Kiedy. occurred when a car bv Geor4 all expenses to paid the state Several weie not repre- Wait, a weslthv fsrmei. and occupied board of agnc.iltuie and to work sentid Albf.t Zorn. of Milan who wtuyitu four hours each dav on tlv fair rppea--ed as a Sundav school gronnds If the rpcommendation of tenriem. was held not to be entitled the committee making the selection tc a vote. is followed, Ro'hn Steen and Lynndon There was the liveliest kind of a Scheid will also attend, their expenses contest for the place with twelve candi- to paiJ bv the Erie County Agri-' dates, and the resembled the two children were i cultural society. rounty political convention At the about twentv from the tract itf of the eight-eight oitset Dave Ptedy was made chajr- and Mrs SStlTShS man and Fred H. Zerbe. secietary. I n dark when the party o Tnen the applications were read, com- i nroarhed the crossing Wait and 13? from uttte girl occupied the front swt ot Roy J Fitch, Groton: Lawrie John- the car. Wait was driving about M- Ellsworth Arthur Heights; who by wife and two childien, a boy lncl tnree years wag struck by a passenger train on the W-i'kill Vallev Railroad. The a.ito- mobile was demolished and Wait was cround up ,n the debiis. Mrs. Wait j In every one counties of the state, meetings of ren- resentative men-were held a dock at- the resneetive court houses to make pimikr each coun- tv being entitled to one representa- Vson7' VermiHon- tive. The instructions of Secretary xickols A. P. Handles, of the state hoard-, named the presidents of various Christopher Brod. Huron- countv organizations. Including school, pjerce Birmingham. H B teen miles an hour, and none of imty heard the train present of the county commissioners, secretary the agricultural society and editors of the newspapers, to make the selec- tion. J Scheid. Huron.: Hazen Hill, Perkins; The automobile -was sqt-arely Benjamin! the tracks when it was hit. Vermilion: Rolhn Perkfcs; LISBON, Aug Thiit> srmy of- C. MixtT. Milan; Lewis weie poisoned ar thrtr Margarett. James garetta. The of all read in full. (Com 5) at Trre Novas arsenic. Prompt use o' saved the lives of all rf presumtd that act of revenge. J   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication