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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: June 26, 1911 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - June 26, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        f 1 K EVERYBODY IN SANDUSKY AND VICINITY WONDERS WHAT IS MEANT BY THE WORDS, "THE ROSE IN THE RING." WATCH THE STAR JOURNAL FOR AN ANNOUNCEMENT SOON. j JK THE SANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, MONDAY, JUNE 26, 191 LAST EDITION NUMBtK Case Which Led To Resignation of Ballinger Finally Decided Adversely ta Claimant sand Pinchot Wins His Fight For People. SAW IT COMING. WASHINGTON, D. C., June Morgan-Guggenheim sjndi- cate was today frustrated in its attempt to grab millions of dollars' of coal lands in Alaska when Commissioner Fred Dennett, of the general land office, ordered the cancellation of the Cunningham- Guggenheim coal claims in Alaska. These are the claims that figured in the Ballinger-Pinchot controversy and are variously estimated to be worth' from to It was the fight over these claims that >ead finally to the resignation of Richard A. Ballinger from the cabin- et. Walter Fisher, who succeeded him, was vice president of Gifford Pinchot's National Conservation Association and the cancellation of the claims in the interest of the pub- lic is his first big step in carrying out the Pinchot policies. The Cunningham attorneys have al- ready announced they will fight the ruling ana carry the matter to the United States supreme court. Fisher declared his decision is final so far as the department of the interior is concerned but he will later ask the congiess to pass new laws governing the coal and mineral deposits in Alaska. The Cunningham claims in- volve acres. BOX; GALLERY HOW MANY PLEASE0 iONDON, June opera per- formance, to be given tonight at Co- vent Garden by command of the king as a windup of the coronation festivi- ties, will be the most brilliant operatic event ever seen in London. Bids of for single boxes have been re- fused while HO cent gallery spats are selling for Destin, Melba and Tetrazzmi will be the principal solo- ists. Quits Vacation To Complete Plans For Standard Oil Reorganization. NEW YORK, June tion of the Standard Oil Co. to con- form with the recent decision of the SAGINAW, Mich., June 26. "Call an undertaker at the end of the fifth jokingly remark- ed John Edward Long, 32, a sugar beet worker near Caro, as he en- tersd a baseball game near his home. In the fifth inning he step- ped to the plate as the first man at bat and made a home run. Then he sat down on the players' bench and dropped dead. The'coroner decided that heart trouble killed him. NtlfOI Fate of Reciprocity Bill May Be Decided In Senate Today THE TURNING OF THE, THE WEATHER v Forecast: and thun- derstornis toniaiu and Tuesday, sonipwhat cooler Tuesday. Tempciacure ai 7 a. m., 73 de- grees. Temperature one yt-ar ago 7S degrees. Sun rises Tuesday at 4-f-l a m. and sets at T.nT p m. (standard Maximum wind velocity 24 hours mdins: at noon today, 15 miles southwest at 11 35 Monday morning, r is HELEN DIUE H SSHO Gives Record Of Alleged ery Conversation Between j Diegle and Detective TESTIMONY TALLIES WITH OTHERS' STOftY WASHINGTON, c., June -26 While the vote on the Root amend- ment, to be taken in the senate today, seems certain to result in its! defeat, the reciprocity bill is really atj its most critical point. A decisive de- feat of the Root amendment will mean WEEK OF FESTIVITIES FOR BRITISH CROWNS LONDON, June Geoige and Queen Mary returned today the certain passage of the bill but no from Portsmouth to be confronted one knows just what will happen. The Root amendment was the only with a program of social functions and festivities that will make the one accepted by the committee. Should'week almost as arduous, as that of it be defeated'in the senate as coronation. Among the more un- assured, senate leaders assert that no portant of the royal engagements for amendment can be tacked to the bill the week are the performance at on the floor of the senate. It is predicted that the Canadian a- greement will be disposed of soon. President Taft has made his plans to Covent Garden ope-ra house tonight, the garden party at Buckingham pa- lace tomorrow afternoon and the Shakespearian ball and gala perform- accompany his family to Beverly at .His latter part of the week and on to leave Washington for such a length fete at Cr5Stal Palace and of time had he not been given assur-Jthe dinner b the prime ministcr on ances tha cti ances that action would have been had TT United States supreme court was the on his pet measure before he start- flenarture for Wind- ed. Tt was stated Feb. 26 that the nres- occasion of the sudden departure of John D. Rockefeller fromTis summer home at Cleveland where he had only gone a week ago, and his return to bills untaxing the necessities of lifej thi.s city. Before Rockefeller returns which congress might put up to him I to Cleveland the plans for the in the extra session That is Presi-j ization of the trust will have been dent Taft's atitude today. He has I completed, not said he would veto any tariff leg-' islation, other than the Canadian procity agreement if amended sor on ident would consider in good faith[ SEEBACH APPEALS CASE TO COMMISSION Patrolman George Seebach, recently SHERWOOD HITS HARD AT "HOUSE OF LORDS" CONGRESSMAN ASSAILS G.A.R. HOUSE OF LORDS Also Assails Congressman An- derson, In Connection, With Pension Bills in Congress the case and names of witnesses and Taft's main fight is now against any, subpoenas will be issued at once, amendment of the reciprocity bill and j this fight is directed against the in- Mananpr Funk fif Thp tnis ng 1S airectea against mclllciym rUlIK, Ul IMC RIlrgents. The report that the presi- 10 000 WOODMEX GATHER June 26. TOLEDO, 0., June dent would veto general tariff legisla- standing adverse weather 'conditions, tion called foith a hot defy from 10'000 woodmen of the World, from Speaker Clark who said the entire tar- all parts of tne country, especially Iff oiisrht to he re.visen m -T_JI______j never tell you what they are going to do in congress. They're too diplomatic. ____ t I'm not afraid to speak right out in meeting and name the house of lords of the Ohio G. A. R. They include Keifer of Spring- field. Hall of Luna, and Brown of and Michigan, came to A conference committee will soon this 'citv to the twenty-first k Tiomnrt 11 TI 4-h n T-iill _ _ bo named to take up the bill for direct election of senators CHOLERA YICTni 0> SHIP NEW YORK, June a clean bill of health was issued to the steamers La Proienre and Bnca Deg- li Abruzzi by the health officers at quarantine and their steerage pas- sengers and crews were brought to anniversary of the order and to take part in the tri-state class initiation of some new members. PASSENGER BALLOON DESTROYED BY FIRE There were seventeen members of the "house of lords" on the platfonn at -the G. A R encamp- ment at Loiain. Only one of them saw active seivice in the war. editor of the National f Tribune, is a paraiste on the old s soldier. He wants the pemsiou HANOVER. Ger., June The big agitation kept up and the ques- his this city, the steamer Hamburg from j passenger carrying dirigible balloon! tion left unsettled. Genoa and Naples, was detained foi Percival V. was completely destroyed i circulation will ini observation She reported the death at sea. six days ago, of a 5-year-old bov fiom an ailment sjmptoinatic, the health of- cers say. of cholera by fire while undergoing repairs today. The airship was badly wrecked several weeks ago and was just about ready for another flight. Several workmen were badly burned in the mishap. that increase Harvester Trust Tells Of Request WASHINGTON, D C., June _ Before the Lorimer investigating com- mittee today, General Manager Funk of the Harvester trust, told the orig- inal "slush" fund story of how Mil- lionaire Hines asked him for a 000 contribution for the election of Lorimer. Sensational disclosures of names prominent Chicago men discussed by Edward Hines and Clarence Funk as identified with the Lorimer corrup- tion fund were made by Herman H. Kohlsaat, publisher of the Chicago Record-Herald. That Col. Theodore Roosevelt has known since early last fall the en- tire story of how Hines is alleged to have asked Funk for a con- tribution to a fund "used to put Lorimer across at was testified to by Kohlsaat. Mr. Kohlsaat said he1 told the story to Colonel Roosevelt just before the Hamilton club dinner at Chicago which Roosevelt refused to attend un- til Lorimer's invitation was with- drawn. It was npon this information, Mr. Kohlsaat said, that the former president based his action in declin- ing to sit at the same table with the Illinois senator. ule prepared for three weeks at least, the sun shiines in taking a snort va-' ing out meager subsistence to the Mr. Kohlsaat further testified that. a general exodus of congressmen from ration tn some cooler climat0 during old soldier." he had written an account of the con-j-Washington has begun Nearly all the the three weeks of the lull in the low-, versatioa between himself and Funk phioant, left the city to take a er branch of congress. i Striking straight from the shoulder and not mincing words, Gen. I. R. Sherwood, congressman from the To- ledo district, author of the "dollar-a- day" pension bill and chairman of the house committee on invalid paid his respects to Congressman Carl C. Anderson, his colleague from this district, to the so-called "house of lords" in the Ohio Grand Army of the Republic, and to certain high-up re- publican politicians and office-holders, Sunday. General Sherwood had attended the state G. A. R encampment at Lorain and then went to his home in Toledo. He came hore at the request of a number of veterans of the Home, call- ed upon General Burnett Sunday morn- ning and in the afternoon addressed an audience of In his ad- dress he avoided politics and personal references and devoted his attentions j_to the activities of certain G, A. R. men in Ohio, at the same time ex- plaining the situation in regard to pen- sion legislation. General Sherwood says his pension bill, known as house bill No. 1, will be reported out by the house commit- tee with a recommendation and placed on the calendar so that it will be taken up early in the regular session convening in December. He it would be idle to attempt to put the bill through the present session as was assured by Chairman McCumher, of the senate pensions committee that no pension legislation will be at- tempted at this session. Not only this, he sa-is. but the democratic lea-i- and President Taif reached an agreement as to legislation to bf Half-Dozen inspectors Involved In Alleged Jewel Smug- gling Case. COLLECTED LITTLE DUTY Man Who Took Notes "Unabla to Identify Defendant, However Wealthy Western Miner Bought Fine Gems For Charmer And For Wife NEW- gling wort' Jve- sraug- nr-i ta.s count of r jtwels presented to Helen Jenkins by a millionaire ad- mirer, is soon to iesult in the indict- ment of a New York man who is at the head of one of the largest bank- ing and brokerage houses in the city. Two other men of great wealth and influence in their a southerner, the other a may likewise be indicted. Charges that he was offered a 000 bribe to abandon his investiga- tion of the alleged smuggling were today made by Deputy Poit Survejor Parr. Four and possibly six customs house inspectors will be charged by COLUMBUS. O., June fore the jury in the Rodney J. Diegle bribery case, Court Sten- ographer Roscoe R. Walcott to- day repeated tile testimony se- cured over the dictagraph install- ed in the room in which Diegle is alleged to have conducted nego- tiations with Detective Harrison Smiley. Walcott repeated conversations to the effect that Diesle, after stating that he thought his services Tsorth had been given and also .to the effect that each was given to Senators Cetone and Hnfl- man to report out the foreign insur- ance bill, while the names of Sen  al- though he followed four men. up to Ibo room and rode down with them in tbe when he takes the witness stand. Mr. Pan- not only knows all about the likewise all about the sensational robbery of "Mrs. Jen- kins" at the Hotel Lorraine late in 1909 when she declared that all her jewels had been stolen. The secret agent could not be induced to talk much, from a souice equally as well informed comes nearly the com- plete story of the jewels. On June 25, "Mr. and Mrs. J. TV. Jenkins" arrived in New York on the Lusitania from Europe They had been making a whirlwind tour of the old world for over thiee months. was the name assumed by SANDUSKIAN'S EX-WIFE. "Did yon see anyone in the hall tol- lovring the askwci. Pros- ecutor Turner. "I saw several men at the end cf taa ban." said WalcotL "How many were think there were four." "How close were you to "I got on the elevator with them." "Did you ever see the defendant be- asked Turner pointing to Eio- Helen Dwelle Jenkins, who now figures in a big jewel smuggling "I don't I know is said micott "Wliat could have reeogufzeif them immediately afterward, but could not now. My recollection is< rather hazy on that point and I would not want to try to identify Walcott spent almost the entira- rnorning reading the notes he had ta- ken while on the other end of the dic- tagraph which was placed in room 317. His testimony tallied almost exactly with that sriven by Detective Harrison and Detective Barry who was present at one of the conversations alleged to have been held with Deigle. The ruline of Judge Kinkead to pit the dictagraph record without identification of voices is considered an "even" break for the two Tho state's attorneys, however, pro- fess confidence that it will complete case in New York, is the divorced I their case, not only against wife of Lee Dwelle, former well known Sanduskian and railway traffic man. The case is of more than ordinary interest here. the western miner. They were ac- companied from Europe by a south- erner who had known the woman before the westerner became infatu- ated with her. Through the western- ers interest in the woman and her friendship for the southerner, the lat- tpr hud been enabled to borrow large sums of money fioru the love- craz'd millionaire with which to finance roroe southern enterprises. The pair brought bark on the T.usi- tainia e fven big trunks and three smaller baggage coutiaptions. The trunks weie filled with the most cost- ly laces, gowns, lingerie and gloves the hundreds of pairs made espe- cially m Naples far the millionaire's charmer. The southern companion, accoiding to the story told by "Mis Jenkins1' to the government officeis t was the chief medium in the smug-1 line; of the jewels the western maa but others. The iury was kept careful guard all day Sunday, the members being taken__fpr__8D ontuiEC__ and not nermitted to separate. Meals are seived in a private dining room. The state has been prepared TO place W. G. Pengelly, a handwritng expert, on the stand to identify the note which Andrews left at the Chittenden, making an appointment with Harrison This, however, was unnecessary, as the fact that Andrews did leave the note for Harrison was admitted by thfj defense, and the note went in with- out further controversy. Up to this point but little intimation of the defense of tsiegle had beea made. It is now thought that the de- fense in large measure will be a tech- nical one. Attorneys for the state say- that it may be contended that Diegla did not have any conversation with Andrews and therefore could not have induced and procured him to take a bribe, as charged in the taken up ar the special session, limit (had mi'-chasPd for her and also for' ing the program io the reciprocity i hi- wife and childien in the westein' bill, tariff lulls, election of United' homo States senators and one or two other! Custom1! officers accepted rhe dec- I bills. As no appropriation bills are ..nation of 'J W Jenkins" that hp to be it would do no eo CONGRESSMEN GIVEN A BREATHING SPELL Congressman Anderson was in a burn- that he moved to lake his bill from the committee three days before it met. pass a pension bill at this time, funds not heinc available Tn nn interview. General Sherwood declared that Congressman Ander- 1 son's pension hill is not properly on an! 'Mu Jenkins" had brouzht back (Continued On Page 6.) no Forty-four congiessmen imro- duced pension bills, had i f printed and sent to their constitu- e reports me arfpd upon COV. WANTS ARIZONA A STATB ents, and never even asked for a 4 There were 59 pension bills in all. proceedings of last Monday veie _ "ror :md lle in records and f STAR-JOURNAL BUREAU. ion bills, as well as the direct election Munsey Building. t of senators resolution with the WASHINGTON. June to Bristow amendment which has been More men wie killed in the ha i tie of Gettysburg Mian in the American Mexican and SpaniFh v.irs combined. The United States the richest documents to substantiate his claim hear no ill-will agnmst Mr And- erson. sairi General Sherwood. "I heinort him in camoaisn and j elected nn tho ftronst'n of s IT- j porting mv 'dollnr-a dav' lull lip Weir-. KIP' on the list, hf the fact that the ways and means com- I repudiated by the house, the members country in the w.irliJ. oucht to be mittee will not have the cotton of the are making hay while ashamed of hailing about dol- TV anted to be c' VJ'K! committee I v, a piano on 'he and harbors corn mittfe The of the wns and means decided j that i chairman 01 the pea sions committee because I am the but without mentioning Funk's short vacation in preparation of what Representatives Cox. -i nrAn- 1 nviMP- 1 to Senators LaFollette and Root. This] promises to Be one of the most ex- ry. Denver. White. Anderson, Whit- UtAU, UTInlU, I was done at the request of Walter L Fisher, now secretary of the interior, and others. tended tariff sessions of recent times, acre. Francis. Post and others have The whole tariff program has been, all left Washington to enjoy a few torn wide open, and from present ap- i weeks of rest before the strain of fur- "Senator Root wrote me in reply." j pearances there will be a general re- tfccr tariff revision. said the witness, "and thanked me'vision of the tariff before the snow1 for the information. He said that it flies, although it is likely that the re- liad .greatly influenced him in making vision will not be consummated much RESULT OF A GUN FIGHT (Continued on Page Eisht.) ANNISTON Ala.. June man John L. Cunningham wa-s killed, po'ice CMcf Glosson was ser- A FOR BETTER ROADS lutu .gleanv iiuiiuciiv-cu mm ni win uui uc LLWiouiuuiciLVU iiiucu made Preparations fO" his speech against Lorimer on the before that time-. A week ago the pos-, a baseball game to be played earlv in iously wounded and James Glasswood, floor of the senate." sibility of congress remaining in ses- at American League Park" in another officer, was shot through the i i Qo-nofny niQm_ iimie-i .1 _ i V.1- Q Q TVin1_ exclaimed Senator Gam- fole. "Do yon mean to say that sena- tors were influenced in arriving at their decisions by matters noj; in evi- "I did not discuss that question with Senator replied Mr. Kohlsaac. i iprocity. free list and woolen 1 sion after the first of August would Washington promises to be a iwrist have been ridiculed. Today it is painful certainty. While the senate 3s holding sessions The republicans have not fully de- i every -day and losing weight over the upon their 1 presence on the calendar of the rec-' ________L_. a hummer. The proceeds of the 'will'jo to charity. WASHINGTON. June to director of the United States t office of public roads show that with a pipe mol- j the opening of the highv.-ay building who resisted arrest for disorder- season this jear the good roads move- ly conduct. has received its greatest impel- since the foundation of the re- v. More than a day j'..- being expended in the United on the improvement of roads. In a hospital, ndr" iia v iunv utr- i their line-up vet but Rep- wlth shot fired mai1 v ----------_ J______j was among the citizeus that tau (Continued On Page 2.) him. Prosecutor In No Hurry Ta Press Action To Compel Publication Governor Richard E. Sloan, of Ari- zona, never lets' up in his effort to secure statehood for his territory, and is always in the forefront in securing better conditions for his people, settled: at once. Every- indVation points to a post- until late m August or fall of rhe injunction suit to compel tfad publication of the repou of the coun- ty examiners, who found many ir- I regularities in connection with tile jv.oik of rhp county commissioners, i The re-pnn was filed over three ago and Prosecutor Hart 1 suit against Auditor Deist a month ago. but the tetter's at- torneys have not filed an an- s-ner The case cannot be heai-d ia Juiy. as there will be no sessions of tho common pleas wurt then, and it will not be reached in the lew re- maining days of this month. Prosecutor Hart has reasons for not wanting the trial of the case be- fore fall, but he has not yet madft them public. A month ago. the au- ditor and commissioners de- clared that the suit could not bf settled too soon for them, hut thf-y are keeping very quiet about the matter now. It is asserted that there is a grtat deal of sentiment in favor of the Im- mediate publication of the report. pecially in the country districts. stmtiment is coupled with a strong desire tc have the injunction Mtt SPAPFRf   

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