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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: June 3, 1911 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

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   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - June 3, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        THE NOME PAPER. THE TODAY'S NEWS TODAY _________, I ANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 1911, LAST EDITION NUMBER 202, High Official of Legislature, It 1 Is Claimed, Has Made Revelations. PROSECUTOR GRANTS FIRST IMMUNITY BATH Hogan and Turner say they are Certain Of Conviction In Next Case COLUMBUS, O., June be- came known from an authoritative source Saturday tfhat Charles W. Kempel, chief clerk of the house of representatives, had made a confession to Attorney General Hogan and Prosecuor Turner that he acted as intermediary for the payment of a bribe of to Representative Evans, of Stark county, who is already under in- dictment for alleged bribe solicita- tion. It is understood that Kem- pel has .been offered immunity in Vie event' that his'part in the transactions should be indictable. It is said he confessed having ac- cepted money from a lobbyist who wanted it given to the assembly- man mentioned. The confession of Kempel is be- _ to. haves been the reason for the postponement "bfSthe Evans trial which has been set for Monday. The Kem- pel statement was made Friday it did not become known until Satur- day morning. The source from which the information of the Kempel state- ment came is positive in spite of the fact that both the attorney general and the prosecutor refuse to euher deny or affirm. The confession, it is believed, will be of great value to the prosecution and may lead to the un- covering of. other cases. Kempel today admitted that he yes- terday told the grand jury that he had carried given him by L. C. Miller, a loan agent at Akron, to J.'C. of Alliance, who at that timg -was acting as a lobbyist at Columbus against a to curb loan agents. At Columbus, however, Kempel stated that Stiarer told him to give the money to Representative Evans, of Stark county, which, he says, he did. Evans today denied all knowledge of the above transaction. Hogan and Turner declared that they were absolutely positive of con- viction in the next bribery case which will be tried. They intimated that, unlike the Nye case, the evidence is not almost entirely dependent on the word of the chief prosecuting wit- ness. Next week the prosecutor's office will be busy with routine criminal cases which have accumulated while attention has ben centered chiefly on the bribery work. Decks will be cleared of work to return to brityery trials, Monday, June 19, when the case against Representative Owen J. Evans of Stark-will be cajUed. The indictment against him charges solic- itation of a bribe of ?650 from Brewer John F. Weiss of Canton, on the Dean "wet" municipalites 'hill, against eh-J5vass--voted. Evans will b  Mena, have unseated a liberal presi dent. The country is at white heat. The capital is mad with excite- ment, openly expressing the belie that Estrada and the liberals plotted to wreck the presidential palace ant Diaz sits in his chair. But General er of Luis Mena. to. kill those in power. It is worthy to note, too, that the garrison was commanded by a broth. jury adjourned until Monday morning. While several wit- nesses were heard, it is understood that most of the day was devoted to considering evidence which has been received.. Several times during the day there were false rumors that an- other partial report was to be made, additional indictments. This report now 'is expected early next week, after which the jury probably will again be recessed while attention is devoted to pending trials. The contempt cases brought by the defunct senate committee against Editor N. D. Cochran of To- ledo, Editor E. E. Cook of Columbus, and Attorney Charles ,T. Pretzman of Columbus, will be returned by the grand jury to police court. Local court procedure provides for an ap- peal from the court of a justice of the peace to police court. This was overlooked when the men were bound over to the grand jury after waiving examination. The course is the usual one followed when misdemeanor cases are sent to the grand" jury, when po- lice court has final' jurisdiction. Bryan Now Said to Support Bill Which Will Go to The House Wednesday s1- Star-Journal Bureau, Munsey Building. WASHINGTON, June J. Bryan has come into camp on the wool proposition. He will support the bill agreed upon in democratic caucus. Positive word has been re- ceived from him to that effect, al- though he had- first insisted upon free raw wool. At Minneapolis he was quoted as saying: "The democrats are responsible to their constituents. The matter was fought out on a false basis and I shall 'be mistaken if the public is de- ceived by the pretense that the tax was levied for revenue. The amount could be raised by a tax on raw silk or raw rubber, with more justice. There are many other ways." By, a strict party vote the house committee on ways means to- day decided to report favorably the bill for the revision of the woolen tariff schedule as presented to the caucus last Wednesday. The mea- sure Will be Tuesday and tf> ilia Tinnsa will come up for de- bate Wednesday. It provides for a twenty per ceat duty on raw wool. Democratic caucus leaders say their action prevented a storm that threatened to wrecJt house harmony, guaranteed enactment of the first of the big schedule revisions of "the Payne-Aldrich bill, and gave notice to Bryan to keep hands off. President To Deliver Three Ad- dresses Favoring Reciproc- Supports Him CHICAGO, .111., June Taft arrived in Chicago today for the purpose of making his crowning plea for Canadian reciprocity. He -will de- liver three addresses during the day in behalf of the proposed treaty, the .principal one being this evening be- fore the Western Economic society. He is accompanied by Secretary of the Interior Fisher and Secretary Hilles. The Tribune, publishes the results of a poll of newspapers in twenty-two states of the central, western, south- western, northwestern and Pacific di- visions on the question of approving the reciprocity agreement. To more than newspapers, representing every shade of political opinion, the Tribune submitted' this question: "Are you in favor of the approval by congress of the reciproc- ity agreement with Canada negotiated by President The replies numbered of which were definite, even if qual- ified, expressions of opinion. Of these were in favor-of the agreement and against a 3 to 1 vntp. for the pnlinv advocated by Pres- the governor's veto. He has instructed the state auditor not to honor any voucher on the fund. Should the legis- lators to be able to draw their salaries Jin advance the state would lose u ASKING-TON, June j interest on it. Hogan holds that the bly the most sensational disclosure i grab is unconstitutional and illegal. yet made in the steel trust probe Gov. Harmon signed the Smith 1 per that by Judge Gary, late .yesterday, to the effect that Elihu Root, now Stlry'T Awards bill which absorption of the Tennessee Co.1 cent, tax rate limit bill, and with the of one sec tion the Hollinger tax bi 11. These two meas- Iron Co. the United States Steel wu VJ tun UU11VU OWlLtO OLCCi A; corporation. 5t corroborated the een- 'tlclans.of boch Parties, constituted the eral opinion that Root, no matter. more important portions of the ad- what office te has held, ias main-: Program With tained an underground rrmruvtirm jthe Smith bill as the foundation the Miss., the biggest Edwards. Edwards, of Parchman, man physically ev- other measures expected to con- er announced for an office ia .Miss- making the Program issippi, wants to be sheriff. He bases 'his claim for votes on his size, and with WajTstreet. According to Root from j the office of secretary ofj ____. state secretly pulled the wires. Tne stricken from the Hoi- is distributing the following maneuvered' the deal, and when is one relating to banks and j no politics being all was in readings stiffened associations and was inserted by "I am 3T years old, 6 feet and 3 T-> -tAt i i J-1, _i w Roosevelts backbone with the subtle card, advice through which the steel trust gobbled up its mightiest competitor and, went scot free. Root, of whom the late William C. Whitney said: "He can always tell us what we may was there with the goods at the vital period. When the steel trust most needed to be told what it could do, Root vindicat- ed Whitney's laudatory statement. And then by a cro-rs-cut into the de- the powerful .lobby through their j inches high! wear a 'NO 7 V4 hat agents in the senate after the bill had I No. 22 collar, No 11 shoe measure passed the house. As originally j 62 inches in the and weigh drawn the bill retained the tax com- 422 pounds. Eat heartily sleep mission power to examine such rec- well, ords of banks and loan associations as might be necessary to aid them in taxation matters. This provision was knocked out by inserting a section to the effect that nothing in the bill should be construed to permit such examinations. By striking out the New Utilities Law Makes sible Deal That Has Long Been Desired MEANS ONE SYSTEM ONLY IN EVERY CITY Morgan Expected To Have a Part In The Men Waiting, While no steps have yet taken here, it is believed by local telephone men that under the new utilities bill just passed by the leg- islature and which, it is expected, the governor will sign, a telephone merger will be worked out. This will mean but one telephone sys- tern in Sandusky and other cities, and one long-distance line. President John A. (Jiedeman, of :he Sandusky Telephone Co., said Saturday that he hoped such' a merger partment of justice through the section, the governor, according to White House, so fortified- the trust in its violation of the Sherman anti- trust law that it is an open question now whether the trust can ever he brought to bookr for this particular offense. Gary told it reluctantly but in de- tail, -to an astounded audience that drank in every -word of the dramatic recital. told how Roosevelt, in the absence of Attorney General Bona- jarte, called on Root, then secretary of state, for advice in the matter of Tennessee Coal Iron. He read records of that fateful morning at .he W'hite House, in the shape of letters which -passed between .him- self and Root, 'and sowre that verbal assent to the transactions had been given by Roosevelt and Root with assurances that the government would not intervene or interfere. Gary told how Root notified him letter that all correspondence drink lots at of water "and no around for my Am a didate for sheriff of SiVflower coun- taxation authorities, has materially strengthened the bill. Gov. Harmon in his veto message says: "Justice to real estate owners re- quired that measures be taken to se- cure from owners of other ivinds o property their just share of taxes To accomplish this it is necessary tc subject ,to taxation, personal proper ty, moneys, credits, etc.. which have largely escaped, and to 'put these on the duplicate at their true value, ai is done with real estate. "The purpose of the bill is to deal away doubts and ambiguities in tke tax commission law and make tha body more effective. As passed by the house the bill accomplished these purposes, but among the amendments made by the senate is one whose ef feet would be to obstruct the laud able work in progress with respect to deposits in banks, trust companies building and loan associations anc shares in these associations, whether ident Taft, shattering the dreams of the .foes of reciprocity. CHARGE CASHIER WITH EMBEZZLING BIG SUM THE TRAGEDY OF IT. __.___ WELLSTO'N, 0., June Thomas Evans, of Representative George Nye, died yesterday following the receipt of the news that Nye had been ac- quitted of the bribery charge at Co- :S lumbus. Mrs. Evans had been making her home with Represen- tative and Mrs. Nye and 'her death is attributed in part to the strain under which the family labored while Nye was on trial and the re- action that followed his acquittal MINNEAPOLIS, June D. 'Bren, cashier of the University of Minne- sota, who yesterday declared he had been held up on the campus and rob- bed of was today arrested charged with embezzling that amount from the university. Bren. however, still insists that 'he was robbed. TAFT AXD TOGO DENVER, Colo., June bring Admiral Togo, head of the Japanese navy and President Taft together in Denver this fall is the plan of the chamber of commerce. An invitation already has 'been extended to Presi- dent Taft. Togo has announced his intention of visiting America- after .the coronation. ween them on the subject, as well held by borrowers or investors all Ol. as the correspondence between Root! which long have been most notorious and President Roosevelt would be for absence from the duplicate filed with the department of just- "Under its general authority the ice. This was done that there might commission has power to make exam- hands steel corporation in the the government if the poration should be attacked under the Sherman law for the merger in cor- i inations necessary to jtion required for discharge of its I duties with respect to all kinds of property, but hy this section it is ex- (Continued On Page Six.) WOMAN ARTIST ARRESTED MS LEADER OF BAND OF HORSE THIEVES Suppressed Letter of Admiral Made Public As Maine Is About to Float NEW YORK, June letter from Rear Admiral Melville who at .ttie time of the blowing up of the Maine was engineer ia chief of the American Navy, and in which he as- 6-erts his belief that the 'Maine was blown up by an explosion OH the in- eWe and not by the Spaniards, -was Just made public today. The letter vas_ written shortly after the ex- plosion occurred but was suppressed. Pumps In Position. HAVANA, June Pumps were today placed in readiness for the pumping the big coffer- dam that will permit of the raising of the battleship Maine. Actual pumping, may sot begin until Mil week. EERGER, A SOCIALIST, ALSO A NEAR'LA WYER STAR-JOURNAL BUREAU. Munsey Building. WASHINGTON, D. C., June 3 "Victor Berger, The lone socialist member of con- his guilt or innocence. I am primar- ily concerned with a series af flaj. rant and outrageous breaches of lav by civil officials in which a citzen? constitutional safeguards have been gress has been known for a quarter of violated, and 1 am further concern a century as an editor but be has de- ed with the power of the national leg- veloped such proficiency in the law since the McNamara kidnaping case began to engage his versatile talents that his friends say he will soon he qualified to hang out a shingle in- scribed as above. Mr. Berger has just filed with the committee on rales of the house of" islature to assert its right to inter- vene in such a case." Mr. Berger then proceeds to ex- pound the law for the enlightenment -of the committee on rules. "On the afternoon of Saturday. May he continues, "a requisition for the return to California of John J.' representatives a statement of the McNamara. of Indianapolis, was law invnlvod ITT thp MplVamara Irirt. law involved in the McNamara kid- naping case which stumps the able N sented to the governor of Indiana. range of precedents -cited and their, applicability to the case and by the lucidity of expression that character- izes his interpretation of the law. "Berger's brief sounds like a decis- ion from Chief Justice said charged an alleged dynamite explosion in Los Angeles, Cal., and with being a f fugitive from justice. At o'clock of the same afternoon, in a time when Lake Shore Electric Experi- menting With Two Inven- tions on Lines MAY PREVENT COLLISIONS. George Burmelster, Local Con- ductor, Inventor of Magnet System Of Promise Devices for safeguarding cars on interurban lines are being tested on the Lake Shove Electric line between this city and Fremont, and between Sandusky and These have been Junction, in operation two months and have been ffective thus far. The one being tried out between Sandusky and Fremont was only re- cently patented. It combines a" sta- tion indicator inside the car, a dial, in the motorman's vestibule and a bell in each vestibule for the motor- nan and conductor. The mechanism s tripped by a- trigger placed along :he track half a mile from any sta- would be worked out, ai- notning had yet oeea done. Some time ago it was said that a merger was probable should, a suit- able law be enacted. In Cleveland, es plans are already being discussed or a merger which will do away with the two systems, so long con- sidered a nuisance. The utilities law provides for regulation as to stoelc and bond issues and also as to rates so that the public will be protect- ed. The generally accepted idea is that the telephone business Trill be divid- ed, the Bell. interests taking over all long distance lines while lor the most part the so-called independents or home companies will take over the local exchanges. Whether this plan would be followed in. Sandusky is a question not yet determined. The independents expect the el the Morgan interests in 'bringing; .oat tho merger. Some time ago. Morgan. acquliiBd control of the Cleveland, Toledo and Columbus independent properties, and also the U. S. long distance line. Jas- S. Brailey, jr., who is heavily Interest- ed in the Sandusky Telephone Co.; as- sisted in this deal but the Saadusky plant was not included. It has fre- quently been claimed that Morgan nought the Ohio properties for the Bell Co., although it was also assert- ed that he was opposing the Bell In- terests. The real facts are expected to develop soon, now that a merger lias been made legal. It is said that one result of the re- alignment of telephone interests may be the adoption of a new system, that of measuring the service, and making charges accordingly. By this plan, me- ters would be attached to phones, re- cording the number of calls and the length of time the instrument is used. tion where the any purpose. .rar is to stop for As the train passes over the trig- ger the bells in the vestibules are tarted and continue until the motor- man and conductor turn them off. When the motorman steps to the lial to turn off the bell he sees his orders for meeting cars or for any pedal stops in a clip alongside the bell and is reminded of he is j meet and where. With a simple addition the mech- nism may be. connected with a wire hat runs along the rail, so the bells re started ringing every time an- ther car comes within 2.000 feet of he one on which the dial is placed, f all cars are equipped, every con- actor and motorman would be noti- fied of the approach of another car. There have been several instances n the test thus far to prove the re- iability and efficiency of the device, party of traction men has been slwd to visit Sandusky to make an nspeotion of the device and will do o during the next few weeks, j Those who have seen it have pro- j nounced it simple and effective. Once it has been thoroughly tested and given opportunity to prove its worth, it will be adopted by all in- terurban lines, so the claim. The device in use between this i BUFFALO, N. June 3.-r- Tne big passenger .steanter p the largest passenger vessel on. the Great Lakes, and valued at 000, was completely destroyed by fire this mornins The vessel .was lying at her dock when the fire start- ed had to be towed out into tbe lake to save other vessels. She sailed between Buffalo and Duluth Engineer King Reports Huron Bridge Sub-Structure pleted And Would Quit. general lines' the one on the oth- p er run. although' it combines several distinctly new features. Some petent electricity railway men MARION, Ind.. June Rosa Berry, aged sixty, an animal painter w w t ,b six hours, McNamara arrested by pri- a member of the rules committee. a force of IndianapoHs police This emanation from the brain of vate detectives. taken before A V01IWS the only socialist who has broken m- jndge and after having been denied to congress ,s decidedly interesting. council, was turned over to the "I may rayhere. he begins "thsi Angeles authorities, bv whom I assume neither the guilt nor the ir nf mtv nocence of McNamara. I am not, a> the higher courts were adjourned and I of note, is under arrest here on u s_ I.. 'charge of horse stealing, and it is aK leged she is the leader of a band of horse thieves which has been operat- ing in the neighborhood of Vistula, Mich., Mrs. Berry's home. She seems unable to explain her criminal lean- ings. Mrs. Berry is a woman of .culture and hpr home is a beautiful one. She was I out of the city. At the time paintings of horses." Officers de- clare a set of dyes -were found in Mrs. Berry's home -with which she could materially change the appear- ance of horses which the band, of which she was the reputed head, stole. Charles Berry, who says he is a brother of the accused- woman, and who is also under arrest, confessed that he stole horses at her orders and that she led the band of horse this moment, concerned with elUnrj----- (Continued on long.Md_a_ipod. .market for..her. directing. their City Engineer Clifford King, who since the start of the work has beea chief engineer in charge of the work on the new Huron river bridge at Huron, Saturday in a letter to County Surveyor Schultz, reported that tha work on the substructure of tha judges was and that ha i would like to resign his position aa city and Ceylon Junction is the in- c.hJIef S0on was ventton of Conductor George Bur- 1 reheve of Qls duties. En- meister and is said to be the King charge Of com- de- Huron bridge job before his appoint- ment to the city position. In his letter. Engineer King stated that every precaution had beea taken clare that Burrneister's "invention is j to safeguard the of __ tia the best that has yet been proposed.' Hs uses a magnet to operate the warning mechanism instead of trigger. It is cjaimed by some that weather conditions, such as heavy icy periods, would inter- snows or fere with the effectiveness of the workings of the trigger whereas the magnetic system would suc- cessfully under all conditions. HAS GROUND FOR DIVORCE. ______ LOWELL, Mass., June 3. Because his wife insisted on keeping ftftfign, angora .cats in the kitchen, Edgar R. Taylor, formerly an ocean steamer cap- tain, is county and insure the success of the work. He stated that all cement and steel was tested. The bridge will not likely be resujy for use before December 1st al- though the superstructure will go up within the next 45 or 50 days, largest part of the job remaining wiil be the building the approaches to the bridge and the W. L. E. Ry. Cft. which has charge of this work, hM six months in which to complete job. Four car loads of steel for superstructure are now on the ground and two more are enroutp. are four girders already wbteh are 63 fast wpi-shi 000 pounds. .Pour other (tor..' today suing long   

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