Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: May 30, 1911 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   The Sandusky Star Journal (Newspaper) - May 30, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                        1 ,y' ''V ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF METHODISM IN NORTHERN OHIO, THE CENTENNIAL OF STIRRING PIONEER DAYS: SEE WEDNESDAY'S STAR-IODKNAC THE S ANDU S RY S TAR -JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1911, LAS? EDITION NUMBER 198 THE MEMORY OF OUR LIVING AND DEAD, IS TODAY HONORED TOBACCO TRUST IS Decision Points Way For Be- coming "Reasonable" And Complying With Law. rROSECUTIONS SEEM CERTAIN TO FOLLOW Matter Is Put Squarely Up To Attorney Harlan Dissents, THE WEATHER _____WASHIINGTQN, D. C., M ay 30. legal circles here today it is __aefierally not only does supreme court decision rr. the tobacco trust case lay the founcatron for criminal proceed- ings against the individual offi- cials, but that the matter is put directly up to Attorney General Wickersham for action. Had the court merely affirmed the decree of the lower tribunal criminal suits would have been barred but by reversing the decree in re- spect and holding that the indi- _vidual officials of the trust are guilty of criminal conspiracy in restraint of trade the court practi- cally makes it mandatory that Wickersham begin criminal pro- ceedings. With the decision coming long aft- er business had closed, and with the Forecast: Unsettled with occa- sional showers tonight and Wed- nesday. Moderate winds, mostly northeast. Temperature at 7 a. m., de- grces. Temperature one year ago, degrees. Sun rises Wednesday at a. m., and sets at p. m. (stan- dard Maximum wind velocity 15 miles northeast at Tuesday mom- ing. STIRRING TIMES IN SANDUSKY AS WAR BEGAN FIFTY YEARS AGO holiday intervening, there is no like' for such operas as "Pinafore" J in fact, the court, "The aied here suddenly of heart disease. He was in his bath i at the time of his death. lihocd of a flurry. while finding: the American Tobacco Co. guilty of violating the Sherman law, points out' the way for it to be-. comn "reasonable" and continue in 'business. Attorney General Wickersham says it is a complete victory for the gov- ernment and is pleased. The trust is held to be a combination in restraint of trade, a monopoly in violation of law, and to have been guilty of intimi- dation. As in. the Standard Oil .case Justice Harlnn dissents and ob- ject to applying the ".rule of reason." The dissolution which the court ordered, un'.iks Co., is to that, of the tSandard be carried on under circuit court of appeals for the south- ern district of New York. The su- preme bench places upon that, court the burden of devising also a plan of "recreating, out of the elements now ORATOR AND COMMANDER AT TODAY'S SERVICES. NEWARK, 0., May Dov- er, charged with first degree murder in the Newark lynching last summer, was sentenced by Judge Wickham to three years in the penitentiary, the sentence being suspended during the pleasure of the court. BAST LIVERPOOL, 0-, May lis. Johnson, 12, son of Dr. C. E. John- son of East" Palestine, .this county, is in a serious condition at a Pittsburg hospital as the result of a kick from a horse. An operation failed to re- lieve him. LONDON, May 30 Gilbert, famous as the creator of the PITTSBURG, Pa., May W. Barker, 36, paying teller of the Dia- mont National bank, was arrested by the federal authorities and charged with .embezzling of the bank's funds. Southern Sympathizers Assail- ed And First Company Was Recruited. (By a Sandusky Veteran) I do not know that I can. recall anything that happened just fifty years ago today, but I have a vivid remembrance many things that happened about that time. There was considerable excitement in the little city of Sandusky, as well as all over the country. Fort Sumter had been fired upon by our southern bro- thers, war had been declared, Presi- dent Lincoln had called for volunteers and the Sandusky were anxious to do their part. A recruiting office was opened in Sa-ndusky. There were a-few--among us that sympathized with the south. They were spotted and carefully watched. One young man who had given expression to his sentiments and incurred displeasure was secreted in a store on Water street. The place was surrounded by a crowd and there were cries of "Mob "Shoot etc. The fire alarm was finally sounded in the hope of drawing the at- tention of the crowd in another di- rection and the fellow was spirited away later. No one was hurt. Sever- al other sympathizers slipped away about this time. >H. N. Bill, who had seen some tnil- iltary service in the state militia, had a uniform which he was urged to put on, thus adding enthusiasm. It re- quired no urging to get recruits, the number wanted enlisting in about one day. Hiram G. Depuy, who had also seen some military service, was made captain of what became Com- pany B, Eighth Ohio Volunteer In- Continued on Page Bight) BIG FIRE LOSS BELLEFONTA1NE, O., May 30- NEWARK, N. J., May shows the martyr president in a char- Theodore Roosevelt was the chief acteristic attitude, seated on a bench, speaker today at the unveiling of a with his familiar high hat at his side, statue of Lincoln on the. plaza monument is six feet six inches front of the courthouse in -city.; high nine feet four inches in The village of Big Springs, this ooun- Lincoln Post, of the Grand Army of i width, ty. was nearly wiped out by fire. The i the Republic, conducted the lorc'inn-1 William Garwood Son ies, which of a most impressive including a sawmill, hoop and stave character. factory, planing mill, stone crushing The statue is a gift to the cityii Taft Talks to Veterans. ____ .Washington, D. C., May, the plant and hardware store, the only from the late Amos H. Van Horn, soleuin_ and impressive ceremonies eluding a horse valued at dustries in the village, were complete-, who 'bequeathed, for the pur-1 Memorial Daji was observed in the ly destroyed, entailing a loss of j pose. The memorial is of bronze and national capital today on a more 000. j was designed Yy Gutzcn Borglum. It Special to the Star-Journal: VERMILION, May this morning destroyed the barn of John N. Engelbry, with its contents, in- The barn was valued at a-nd th-e total loss probably exceed It comprisng it, a new condition which FLOWER-FILLED CRAFT SUNK AT NEW YORK' sna.11 be honestly in harmony with and not repugnant of the law." In order to enter n ibecame necessary for the supreme to reserve and remand the to the federal court in New York. The decision of the supreme court goes much farther than of the lower tri- bunal. It includes within the con- demnation of the decree, the 29 in- dividuals named in the- government's bill of complaint, the two English cor- porations, the British-American Tobac- co Co. -and the Imperial Tobacco Co., (Continued on Page Six.) One Hundred Thousand People At Indianapolis When Forty Start Contest '.1 MORTOR SPEETDWAY, Indianapo- lis, May hours before the gates were opened here today 10.000 people wer waiting to be admitted to the trig 500-mile international automo- bile sweepstake race that will be run today. The.-crowd in Indianapolis to- day exceeds those of any previous oc- casions, spectators being present from nearly every state in the union. Not less than of them will probably see the race. Forty cars started in the race which will be made famous by its length, 300 miles having been the greatest length- cars have raced in this country heretofore. First Fatality. Within a half hour after the start of the powerful cars the first fatality had occurred. S. P. Dickson, mechanician for Arthur Gremier's Amplex car, was on his 13th lap when both the rear tires exploded and the car was overturned. Dickson was instantly feiiled and Gremier who was driving, elaborate scale than for several years ;s covered by insurance. past. Business was in all- Mr. Engelbry had just .returned the departments of the government. a drive about 8 o'clock, placed Public interest centered chiefly .in j big horse in the barn and walked the exercises at the Arlington Na- j Bround' to the post, office when the tional cemetery, where Taft delivered the memorial (Conf. on Page 5) President address" RUB Rl Uli IK AFTERNOON PROGRAM. Band. Ross W. San- derson. Introductory Chairman, Prof. Tuesday morning's observance of tha day here consisted- of their participa- tion in the ceremonies at the Soldiers' Home and the customary services on, the bay in honor of the sailor dead. At the Home, the ladies had charge of the ceremonies. The services ptt the steamer Arrow for the sailor dead, were simple but impressive. There "was fire was discovered. Th-e volunteer ftr-eme-ii responded to the alarm but could not save the horse. Adjoining propsry was saved although the barn of Dr. "W. E. Derr was slightly burned and one side of the residence George B. Krapp was scorched. H. B. Williams. Fields' Class. Services at tj'ie a fair of veterans and re- en's Relief Corps. corps members aboard the vessel Band. she circled around the hay. Hymns Department sung and Rev. Ross W. mander t. F. Mack. of the First Congregational Fields' Class. I church offered The conelud- Benediction Rev. Ross W. part of the ceremony was the- Sanderson. of-Sowers-on-.the-iay.------- Band. From Robert. Patton Chapter. Unit- j-ed Daughters of, the Confederacy, Cin- cinnati, Monday came flowers with, Entering heartily into the beautiful, which a local committee flesig- patriotic spirit of "Memorial Day, the j Bated to decorate the- graves of the 208 citizens of Sandusky and Erie county j Confederate soldiers karicd in the of KILLS FOUR OF FAMILY PAWNEE CITY, Neb., May A. McVittie. his wife and two children, were shot and killed, and a third child dangerously wounded in their Former Butler Among Officials Con- victed And Sentenced __. i j i_ IjllttllllJClH beds by Jim Fielder, a farm hand, who provided bv the 'had been working for McVittie. Field- commute, ana weie prowusa L. celebrated the occasion by adorning the j tie island cemetery. The Ctflctanati-------- graves of the hoys In -blue, and listen-1 chapter has for a number of years ing to stirring addresses. As in former [sent flowers for each Decoration Day years, the fact that the Soldiers'j and until recent years the local G. A. Home is located in this city, made the R.' conducted -services at the Island, occasion a very fitting one. cemetery for the hoys in gray who In the morning, McMeens Post. G. were buried there. Tuesday, as was' A. R., assisted by the Boy the case last year, the graves were; scattered flowers "over the graves of j simply strewn with flowers, the veteranes. The flowers were dis- tributed under direction of Benj. F. Deeley, chairman of the cemetery FranCIS er ]ater shot, and killed himself af- ter shooting Sheriff Fuller three times and seriously wounding him. ALL HELD WITHOUT BAIL District Attorney Wise Charged Attempt To Bribe Himself And Juror, Framas X. Butler, formerly of San- dusky. and for a, nurr.ber of years a Tammany man in New York and at- torney for the Unite'l Wireless Tele- graph Co.. wan found guilty with oilier officials of th-e comiiany in the United States court late .Monday and sentenced to two j ears in the Atlanta penitentiary. Christopher Columbus Wilson, the president, was sentenced to three years at Atlanta; Treasurer LONDON, Eng.. -May gov- ernment's veto bill passed its second !laS- at m reading in the House of ords without dissension. Woman's Relief Corps. For the afternoon no parade was at- tempted. At Oakland cemetery each grave of a veteran was marked with a Grand Army star, and a miniature instance of Cemetery Su- perintendeat Schtenk. The Woman's Relief Corps' part of B, 0. OFFICE LIKELY TO STAY IN SANDUSKY Genera! Traffic Manager Wight Here For Conference Gave Local Men Deal Pending. Grand Jury To Hear New Evi- dence Against Committee Nye Trial NEW YORK, May beautiful the crew of a launch, -who took it into tribute was paid to the memory of the Set __J 1 __ -rr-Vin 0-1TTQ T n AT IIX'PR fl llriTl i? n _i 1 kins, president of the New York stock selling agency for the company, one year in the New York peniten- G. W. western fiscal agent, two years in Atlanta. The men are held in the Tombs without bail. Their trial lasted more than four weeks. The co tion. estimated a and not be moved that it made certain the matter will be given j COLUMBUS. O., May to- day develooed that when grand jury resumes its legislative bribery investigation tomorrow at least one member of the senate committee appointed to investi- gate the bribery wilt himself be under investigation by the grand jury. During the recess of the" grand jury, Prosecutor Turner has secured a mass of new evi- dence part of whic-h, it is asserted, may impiicate a member of the in- vestigating committee. His name is not made public. With. seme brief rebuttal testi- There it was launched collectively. They have all ap- sailors who gave up tneir lives during, fhe pjrst Coast Artinery> Sons of Vet-1 Unitgd States District Attorney the Civil War by Tent'No. 18, of the. j erans Reserve, V. S. A-, and was responsible for having National Alliance, Daughters of _the strains of the "Star Spangled Banner" tne to jaji paging ap. Tt now seems quite probable that1 The local business men the B. 0. division freight office will' not leave Sandusky and go to Fos-. toria after all. General Traffic Manager C. S. Wight! serious consideration by high officials mony to be offered in the -case of of was here Monday af-' at Baltimore. Some further data'Representative Nye. charged with ternodn for a conference with a com-: js yet to be furnished Mr. Wight by ..bribery, tomorrow morn-ing, the casa mittee of the "Business Men's associa-: the" Business Men's association. iwill go ro the jury without Nye tak-. tion and leading shippers and while1 Mr. Wight is a brother of C. ing the witness stand ia bis own de- he did not give any positive assurance Wight, the local division freight ag- This has occasioned consider- the local men were much encouraged. ent. The latter is now in California able surprise here but his attorneys declare they are satisfied they wiil a verdict of acquittal without i______ _____r testimony. They offered' to here "iiTcharge of a traffic and with j association is busy with industrial submit the case without argument, one or more clerks. i propositions. A committee consisting The case will go to the jury The Business Men's Association :-0f Adam Liuke. Clarence R. Kil- Crawford's testimony as to tbe ac- President Willard, and J. C. Hauser will go to tual solicitation of the bribe isted more than four the local men were much encouraged. ent. The latter is now in bamonua aoie t f }h Mr. Wight asserted that even were i on a business and pleasure trip. tisclai at wrre en- ithe division office removed an office; while meeting with success in the get a them senarateiv and" of some sort would be maintained j railroad matter, the Business Men's Xlve's fatally injured. Gremier was one cf! Veterans of the United States. and sank quietly and leaving j peai -'Tomorrow every man can the four millionaire, drivers entered! ceremony took place at 129th street; ttte water around it dotted with bios- j put himself out of the reach of this in the race. His jar skidded 20 feet, i and North Kiver, this city. A little soinS. This was-the first memorial court for it is not an extraditable both rear wheels being torn off. filled with carnations, roses, HI-j service of the kind that haS ever tak- he said. "One of them is 1UO.OOO people along the line, ignor- ant of Dickson's death, cheered wild- ly as the other contestants flew by. les, jassamine and was Dome en place in this country. Its simple by G. A. R. veterans to the edge of and pathetic features were most tiie river, and given amid prayer to; pressive. ttouor. The testimoay of worthjl 000 O'OO and he'll s the B. 0., protesting against the re- j Chicago Tuesday evening to moval of the office which has been i gate a proposition from that city for Harrison, Cleveland, to located here for fifteen years, and Mr.! the removal to Sandusky of a con- that Nye suggested to Mm the use of Willard agreed to have a represents-! cern which would erect a large fac-, money on .the Edwards subway trill tive come here. Accordingly. Mr. j tory and would employ many men. is undenied. en route east from Chicago, j The proposition looks good to tfca IO.CT .testimony that Nye told htra that stopped here for a few hours. Heial men but they want more wouia pass his biii also is (Continued on Page Six.) [was accompanied by his secretary.i'tion before deciding to take It ny. {denied. v i JNEWSFAPES.r iEW'SPAFERt   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication