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Sandusky Star Journal Newspaper Archive: April 28, 1911 - Page 1

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Publication: Sandusky Star Journal

Location: Sandusky, Ohio

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - April 28, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               -V! THE HOME PAPER. TODAY'S HEWtTDMY THE SANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, FRIDAY A PRIL 28, 1911, LAST FDITION NUMBER 171 McManigal Has Confessed And Labor Leaders Will Make Him The "Goat" LAWYER DARROW TO [.UNDERTAKE DEFENSE Detective Burns Says Revela- tions At Trial Will Astound Union Labor Men, ENDORSE ARBITRATION _____ LONDON', April to- day gave its unqualified endorse- 1 ment to President Taft's plan for 1 an arbitration treaty between England and the United States at 1 an immense mass meeting at Guild Hall'attended by the most iirbrai- 1 nent statesmen of the country. A resolution endorsinng tl'e treaty was unanimously adopted. CONFESSES OHIO JOBS LOS ANGELES, April fession of three dynamite outrages In Ohio was today made by Ortie McManigal. He assumed the guilt for the dynamiting of a bridge of Vie Cleveland Belt Line railway October 13, 1906; the B. O. bridge at Youngstown, October 30, 1906. and the Steel corporation's house at Struthers, O., Dec. 10, He declared he received In each instance from J. J. McNamara for the job "together with whatever expenses there was attajled. LOS AN8ELE8, April torneys for the McNamara broth- ers today made It plain that Ortie McManigal will be made the "goat" In the defense of the McNamara Following definite announce- ment that McManigal had made another full confession, the Mc- today announc- ed nad also secured fhom him a complete denial of it. Here- after McManigal will not be re- garded even as one of the de- fendants and no effort will be made to save him In the figjht to clear the McNamaras. Clashes In Interior of Mexico Continue Unabated, Wil- son Reports THE MOROCCAN SITUATION France Sends Big Force To Rescue Foreigners AnH Punish Tribesmen, LEADERS OP ORGANIZED LABOR PREPARE TO GIVE FINANCIAL AND MORAL SUPPORT TO DEPEND SECRETARY M'NAMAP.A WASHINGTON, C., April spite of the truoe in Mexico, Ambassa- dor Wilson today to the state department that fighting in the In- terior states is going on unabated The truce is only being observed in the neutral zone about Juarez. The situation continues serious anc apparently Hie government is unable to do very much. Fourteen Americans, captured as in- as being In a sorrji plight, dependent Tor the necessities of life On the. char- ity of American residents. The state department has asked the Mexican eminent to look into the condition of these men. Refusing to surrender or to the train on which he-and his com- mand of thirty soldiers were Being iroutfht to the capital, a second lieu- tenant, little more than a boy, en- Despite previous statement to gaged in a battle with a force'bf 400 the contrary, Clarence S. Darrow will I rebels at Cajones, Guorerro. At the mirrectos, are held in jail a CMhu tt" the Ume the, hua and are described the Araev- Letoher, the American consul there their opmi011 as being in a som, nlirht. uoted sleuth- be chief counsel for the defense, ac- cording to Chicago advices. The defense will he conducted conclusion of the brief encounter, the lieutenants and 28 of the soldiers were dead and the remaining two of me asiense will De conducted "clc UCHU aim LUG remaining two ot henceforth on the theory that there n'8 men were made prisoners. One Is a "Harry Orchard problem" to be dealt with. This was the statement made by counsel for John J. McNam- ara and his brother, James. The two McNamaras are now the only clients of the attorneys retained by labor or- ganizations and their legal fire will be turned on Ortie McManigal, the man arrested as a fellow conspirator. With the arrival in Chicago of Wil- liam J. Burns, who brought about the arrest of the McNamaras and Mc- Manigal, it became known that two other alleged members of the clique of djoamiters who blew up the Los Angeles Times building on October 1 last, fled across the continent four Weeks later and took a steamship from New Yerk on Saturday, Novem- ber 5. They are now in Europe and the police of Germany and Russia have been asked to arrest them. These men are Matthew A. Schmidt, former- ly of Chicago, member of the wood- workers and joiners union, accused of having helped James B. McNamara to carry the nitroglycerine used to blow up the Times plant, and David H. Caplan, last living in San Francis- co, accused of having set the fuse of nltroglycerin charge that blew up the Times. "Schmidt and said Detec- of the arms of the lieutenant was shot away. The rebels were under command of Prndencio' Figuero. Madero's Big Demands. MEXICO CITY. April Madero, it was today learned, has sub- mitted his terms of peace. They pro- vide that he shall be given as the cost of the revolution; that he appoint the governors fit five states and that he be made assistant secre- tary of foreign relations: that a fair election for president he held and that all rebel chiefs be given correspond- ing positions in the regular army. The government will object to the 000 payment. French Troops Are Rushed To Morocco PARIS, Apiil 28. With 30.000 French troops already in the field in Morocco, orders were today issued for another expedition of men to be rushed to that country. This action follows the notification of the powers jiesterday by France (hat In- tervention in Morocco is necessary at Ove Burns, "were Just as active and Is Delleved here that two -Just as guilty as the three others in Frenc" columns of trrops the murderous work at the Los Ange- les Times, where twenty-one persons ware killed, and in the placing of the bombs at the homes of Otis and Ze- bendalaar. However, we have no pos- itive evidence connecting them with the eastern dynamiting outrages in which the others figure. "Organized labor will stand ap- palled when the full story of this ser- ies of dynamite outrages is made known. What has alreadv been pub- lished is sensational, but when at the trial In Los Angeles every gist Is told on oath the masmitude of the crimes the door of these men will be- gin to break upon the public." John J. McNamara, in an informal completely annihilated- by the rebels as nothing has been heaid from them since Sunday when both were run- ning short of food and ammunition If this proves true France is expect- ed to take bloody revenge on Mor- rooco. Desperate Defence. MADRID, April advices smuggled thiough from Fez loday de- clare that (be city is in the hands of the rebels and that the sultan with all have taken refuge in the French consulate from which a desperate resistance is being mado Mlin.u (oveipicrs cut off from their homes were obliged to don Moorish statement, declares his Innocence and disguises in oider to leach the con- his confidence of acquittal. sttlate alive. REVIVE AN OHIO LABOR ASSAILS BURNS STAR-JOURNAL BUREAU, llunsey Building. WASHINGTON, D C, Apill 28 The American Feiieiation of Labor U Third and Spring streets and else- where.1' The evidence in the contested elec- tion case, as embodied in the govern- THE WEATHER. Forecast: Showers tonight, and Saturday slightly cool- er Temperature at T a. de- giees. Temperature one year ago to- degrees. Sun rises Saturday at 4.32 a. m. and sets at p. m. (Standard time.) Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today 10 miles southwest at Friday morning: UTIuIS BILL IS FORMIEVOIE More Stringent Bill Reported Today Although Railroads Are Eliminated. MADE SPECIAL ORDER FOR COMING TUESDAY Declares In Address It's a Case Of "Now Or Never" With Canada. FULL FREE TRADE OFFER pianning a surprise for Detective ment records, makes a book of 232 William 3. Burns in return for the j pases and a considerable part of it is jolts which he has been giving the takfgi up testimony relative to cause of organized labor. The fed- alleged purchase of votes by Detec- eration is preparing to put a charge of dynamite under Burns, not literal- ly, but figuratively, and the labor leaders believe that by the time the> The federation officials and Repie- sentative William B. Wilson, who aie working together, expect to shc-w that instead of being a paragon of virtue and a staunch supporter of the high- est ideals of citizenship, Detective Burns baa a past that is somewhat checkered, a few chapters of which are brought out In a congressional docu- ment entitled "Jno. J. Lenta vs. Bmmett published at the gov- ernment printing office in 1901. This document sets forth the evidence In the contested election case of the twelfth congressional district of Ohio, growing out of the election of 1900. It will be asserted that Mr. Wilson and the Federation of Labor that De- tective Burns has a record as a vote- buyer and debaucher of ballot and that in the election referred to he was engaged in the business of buying ne- gro votes at a dollar a head. On the face of the returns Emmett Tompkins was elected to congress. John J. Lentz contested the election and in a letter he wrote to Tompkins, setting forth the grounds of' contest, :he following appears as the third specification: pursuance of said plan of corruption and bribery William ,T. Burns, assistant chief of the United States secret service, came to Colum- )us, by and with the consent of Pres- ident McKinley and other republican managers of the campaign, and at the of W. B. .Woodhury, secretary of the Franklin county) republican executive committee, and notwith- standing the fact that said William J. Burns is in the employ and on the pay roll of the United States govern- ment for the purpose of ferretting out ind preventing, crime, yet be remained n Columbus on said election day, the Pension Members To Organ ize And Will' Inquire About Anderson's Position. Other Witnesses In Breach of Promise Suit Assail Miss Young's Character. CLEVELAND, O., April trial of the breach of promise suit of Miss Georgian Young against James W. Corrigan, adjourned at noon today, will not be completed until next week. Judge Killits protested to the attor- neys against dragging in the names of innocent people as witnesses. Miss Young's character has been at- tacked rather freely by witnesses for Corrigan. J. J. McKesson, Plttsburg agant for Corrigan, McKinney Co., was a damaging witness. He said he first saw Miss Young and her mother on a street car. The latter asked him for his name, then introduced him to her daughter, and asked him to buy them a drink, he testified. It was McKesson who introduced Miss Young to Corrigan. He said that Corrigan and Miss Young spent a night in his apartments. Corrigan himself on the stand, con- tradicted Miss Young's story at al- most every point. He was grilled by her attorneys. Corrigaa admitted on the witness stand today that at the time he sent for Miss Young to join him at French Lick Springs, Ind., he had gone there to recover from the shock of his fath- er's death. It was at this time that WASHINGTON, April com- mlttee on invalid pensions of which Representative Anderson is a member will organize tonight. It was this committee that Anderson moved to have discharged from further consid- eration of the Anderson pension bill. The members of the committee will ask his reason for taking such an ac- tion at the meeting tonight. Anderson has made a great hit In Washington bv his bill to reduce ex- orbitant telephone service. The tele- phone monopoly heVe has been charg- ing as high as a month for a tele- phone. In an interview today Ander- son said. "In Ohio where the telephone busi- ness is at its best the rates vary of course, in various town and cities, but in no case are we compelled to put up with such superior rates and such Inferior service as we are right here In the capitol of the nation. "It might be suggested that the low- er rates in communities other than this have for their basis the fact that thete is a certain amount of competi- tion In the telephone business. In Washington there is a monopoly and there should be regulation. It is a surprise to me that there has not been an effort made to provide for the regu- lation of rates, at a basis somewhere near justice." Representative Francis, of Ohio, has secured a correction of the Congres- sional Record to show that he voted for the Canadian reciprocity bill He was reported as not voting. .6th of November, 1900, and tor many I the couple admit that they had in- lays prior thereto, and participated j timate relations after. Miss Young al- n the crime of bribing and debauch- leged, Corrigan had promised to ng voters in the neighborhood marry her. NEWARK, O., April Charles Doughty, 17. son of Mr. and Taft Says Dominion Would Not Accept More Sweep- ing Taiiff Reduction, Edwards Tax Bill Passed Af- ter Being Amended Con- trary to Agreement. COLUMBUS, April senate committte this morning recommended for pasiage the public utilities bill and it was made a special order of business for nsxt Tues- day. The bill as reported is more drastic than the ons passed the house although it pro- vided for the regulation of the railroads under old railroad commission law as the roads themselves desired. It also elim- inates the regulation of street railwsys. While there is regula- tion of stocks and bonds, the state railroad commission Is to continue In charge. By the passage of the amended Kff- NEW YORK, April the opin- ion of rait, it's a case of "now or in the mailer of rec- ipioc. with Canada. He so indicat- ed in his talk lo newspaper publishers al Ihe Waldorf-Astoria lasl night w, luc .uieimeu in- His address was the first of a series wards bill in the house, on a recon- in which he plans to evoke public sideration, control of a new machine sentiment in support of his policies, was placed in the hands of a board of and he appealed lo the company of, three state offlcials. In doing this editors and newspaper owners gath- there was plain violation byt certaaia ered from the length and breadth democrats of a pledge made to GOT- of the land, to impress in the public j Harmon. mind that reciprocity should stand The Edwards bill reorganiies tha alone and "ought not to be affected entire assessment machinery of in any regard by other amendments It puts one ofBcer in supreme charge to the tariff law." His recommenda-, each county, subject only to su- tions were warmly cheered. I by the tax commission. He said in part: I "The treaty provides for free trade In all agricultural products; and in rough lumber down to the point of planing. It reduces the duties on sec- TO ABOLISH BOARD 8ec_. COLUMBUS, 0., April ondary" food products by" a fight for it, the stantlal percentage and "it makes such ou" unanimously passed a bill commissioners do not feel justified in going so far." Mrs Charles Doughty, an elevator boy at tte Newark Trust building, while on top of the cage on the ninth floor oil- ing the machinery, lost his balance as the elevator strated downward and was crushed to death between the case and wall. 'roducts of cither country, manufac- r tared or natural, but the Canadian a Mot, but is to bo a appointed until an elected official qualify Jan. 1. 1913. Republicans forced a change of ait- pointing power from the tax commis- sion to the governor. In a conference, attended by Gov. Harmon, Represen- tative Edwards of Cuyahoga, the au- thor; Gebhardt of Montgomery and Kennedy of Allen, an agreement made to lodge appointing power in an ex offlcio board of five. Gtebhardt rep- resented the democrats who voted a- gainst the bill, while Kennedy was of the absent democrats. Under the agreement republican help was expected. Those to compose) the board were: Qov. Harmon, Treasurer Creamer, Auditor FulHnp- ton. Secretary of State Graves and Attorney General Hogan. The gov- .ernor, with Creamer and Hogan, would have controlled against ma- chme democrats behind Graves and the old republican machine working POSSE KILLED MURDERER BLUEFIELOS, W. Va. April Thomas Chnflln, who murdered May- or Hosklns and Chief of Police Mu- stek at Matewan jestefday was to- lay found dead at the foot of Pigeon nountain where he had fled with a bullet in his neck. He had been shot by one of the posse that pursued him. WITNESSES ATTACK CHARACTER OF GIRL WHO SUES RICH IRON ORE MAN FOR FOR HIS REFUSAL TO MARRY HEB STAR-JOURNAL BUREAU, crats. m Munsey Building. How well the special interests have WASHINGTON, April 2S.-ihe last succeeded in getting a use-like giip hope of a downwaid revision of the on the great taiiit rommittw mav be tariff at the present extra session or at judged from the fact that the com- either one of the regular sessions of mittee as it is made up LIU i-i-o.-iunn njiiEpe as it is made up the sixty-secona Congress that are to, actionarics a clear tniijo-ih of five. _i __i Oj fiftteil come almost went "glimmering today I In other words, of the fifteen members I when it was learned that the senate of the committee ten are reactionaries committee on finance has been packed ,and fhe are progressives Divided a- by reactionaries until it would be the Ion? that line the committee stands as vainest sort of a. hope to assume that follows: any> legislation in the interest of the' Reactionaries Penrosc- Cullom ultimate consumer will get past it ex- Lodge. Smoot MrCumbcr 'c.allineer' cept by reason of the compelling force Clark. Hcyburn, Bailer and Simmons' a most insistent and determined total 10 nubile demand Progressives Lafollette. Stone. The committee will be made up in I Kern, Williams and Johnton- total its entirety as follows: 5_ Penrose. chairman; 'Thp compile list of democ-atlr ap- is. Lodge of Massachti-1 was announced. Mean- r of North Dakota, time the ficht between regular and m- of Utah Oalllnger of New. surgent republicans went oier until ..hire LaFoIIette of Wisconsin. today. The insurgents protect azoinst Wyoming and Heybuin of j the refusal of Chairman Gallinger to n place Senators IA Follette and Bris- uemocrats railcy of Texas. Sim-j tow on the Interstate commerce and mons of North Stone of Mis- I finance committees, respectively t sounds tn6 doom of real tsriff leg- Kera, Williams anil Johnson, demo- (Continued on Paga Adam Troll, U. S. Trooper Herer trough Fumngton. ftpr From Border Duty, Tells Of Here for a visit with his sisters. Mrs. Georse Wiles and Mrs Henry Third clares After the bill had been revived for aclion Russell of demxratte floor leader, offered as a substitute for the Edwards board of five, a board of three, eliminating Hogan and Crea- mer. Edwards, fearing treachery, de- manded a roll call, but was ignored by Speaker Vining When a rising vote Lnited T, ,i "ftttrvcl ucu n .13I11K Troll, of Troop F. was taken, republicans supported the States cavalry, de- board of three. Democrats IdentHed his belief that there is" some- thing serious bark of the army man- euvers on the Tetas-Mexlcan 'bolder Troll has just entered upon a three months' furlough after haMng seen iervi'e in patrol duty on the bord- T. He also saw a number of skirm- ishes across the border between Jiex- or with thieir party machine helped put lean regulars and insurgents. Troll believes as, apparently, most of the arniM men do. that the mobili- zation of troops was not ordered merelv for the sake of its moral ef- fect upon Mexico. He thinks that possibly Japan nan suspected of at- tempting to ai-quire Pacific coast rights of 01 was fomenting :he Mexican trouble. At anv lato he there maj be more operations before the "maneiners" are ended Neaih thite veai-s ago Troll was in ,e_ border trmtoii and 
                            

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