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Sandusky Star Journal: Thursday, February 16, 1911 - Page 1

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               LAST j THE SANDUSRY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY NUMBER 110 TO BE SENATE WHIP ON RECIPROCITY BILL Measure Approved By Govern- or Is Offered By Erie County Representative BASE RATES UPON ACTUAL TAX VALUES Merger of Companies Not Pos- sible Except By Consent of Commission OHIO PROGRESS Public utilities bill Introduced which seems to meet demands of the progressives and to be intend- ed to really regulate. Democratc senators rejected substitutes for Stockwell bill, thus favoring the Oregon plan for di- reot election of United States sen- ators. Further steps taken for prison reform. Further expose of bad election conditions in Cincinnati. COLUMBUS, O., Feb pub- lic utilities bill, as offered by Repre- sentative Winters, of Erie, and which is understood to the approval of Gov. Harmon, is a progressive meas- Bure. Careful reading may develop defects, of course, tint ttie measure now seems so strong that the republi- cans are not likely to introduce a bill of their own. Tile-bill converts the state railroad commission into a utilities commis- sion. The salaries of the members are increased from to a year. The expenses of the new com- mission are a yearr The bill provides that no utilities plant can be bought, sold or merged without the approval of the commis- sion. In arriving at the value of util- Ity plants for rate" making purposes the commission must take into con- sideration the physical plants, stocks, securities, etc. The bill has been greatly changed from its first version, and has been strengthened. Rates for service are based on the value of the utilities, under the same rules which apply in placing them on' the tax duplicate. Increases can be' made only in the ratio of increased tax returns. All utilities are required to keep a depreciation fund large enough to cover improvements in pre- vailing apparatus. As the gas and electric council can fixe a rate, one jear be- fore the expiration of a price con- tract. This is subject to review by the state commission, which can com- pel the utility to furnish service Franchise values cannot be capital- ized bejond the amount actually paid to the countj or citj. Puictically all laws gov- erning the railroad commission are retained, the new sections relating al- most entirely to municipal utilities. The municipal and county franchise granting power is protected One of the most radical new fea- ture? is to prevent a utility from se curing an injunction againt an or- der of the commission Orders can be vacated or altered by common pleas court after hearing Strong sections require equality of charges and prohibit tree service, or service below cost to destroi competition. Special sections cover telephones and include some of the vital fpa- tures of the telephone merger bill drafted by independent interests and Gen. Navarro Leaves Jaurez in Pursuit of Leaders of Revolution. SEAT OF WAR IS SHIFTED Clash at Mexicali Results Ir Defeat For Government Tied Up EL PASO, Feb. 16. With the a- vowed intention of "cleaning out" the rebcjs and putting an end to the (Mexican revolution. General Navarro left Juarez today with 700 federal sol- diers to'attack the insmgent head- quarters at Guatlelupe Provisional President Madero and Provisional Governor Gonzales aie at the latter place and it is the purpose of Na- varro to take them prisoneis General Crozco's pickets about Juar- ez vanished last night, presumably to warn their commander of the feder- ils' moves. The seat of war was temporarily shifted from Juarez to Mexicali along the California bolder where a fight was precipitated when 100 federals at- tempted to take the town wnieh is oc- cupied by the rebels. They were re- pulsed, the bridge across the new riv- er dynamited by the rebels and federals withdrew, leaving the town still in Command of the insurgents All trains leaving Juarez were slop- ed and traffic suspended today for fear the insurrectos will use them to con- centrate their forces at Chihuahua. It is reported the insui rectos are mo- bilizing troops at Guadelupe in an- ticipation of an attack. A machine gun was taken along by the federals toilay when they left Juarez on theii march south. Introduced by-Senatoi Municipal franchise contracts with street railroads and public owned utilities are expressly exempt. The bill fills twenty-live typewritten pages and includes sections. In the senate the bill was offered today by Senator JIcGuire. Municipal councils may, within one year of tbe expiration of franchise contracts, flxe lates that tae utintv is to charge after the teim of the ex- isting contract, but the commission on complaint or its own initiative, after thirty dajs notice, shall hear complaints. If the commission it> of Attorney General To Make Strong Point In Argufng For Legality of Session. (Continued on Page Six Sprdal to The Star-Journal: COLUMBUS. 0, Feb Grncial Hogan will make a strong feature of his argument biieft in the" case testing the validity of the ses- sion of legislatuie, which will be filed in the supernip court Mondaj f legislntivp session is step- ped by the courts great injur; to the state will result foi no special session can be called by the governor, there being no legislature until it meets and organizes and that the piesent legis- lature could not do until Januaiy. 1912. This would gieatlv cripple the state as no appropriation could be made STATE EXAMINERS HOLD COUNTY OFFICIALS FOR IRREGULARITIES Resoliition'ln House Today, A Blow At Taft, Adds To Troubles! Arising From Champ Clark's Enthusiastic Speech. ENGLAND DOUBTFUL OF TAFT'S DISCLAIMER. LONDON, Feb Taft's denial of Champ Clark's an- nexation prediction between Canada and the Vniied Suies is given lit- tle credence heie by the conservative press today. They still declare, though the president may denj it, that the United Statps is seeking to annex Canada and have agreed on leciprocity as an entering wedge All conservame papers warn Canada "to beware of reciprocity un- less you want to be swallowed up by America Opposition to the agree- ment is growing more pronounced. EDISON PROBES INTO MUSIC SOUBCE; MAYBE HE WILL INVENT SUBSTITUTE WASHINGTON, Feb. available species of diplomatic and legislative patching was brought Into play today to help fix up the yawning hole which Champ Clark tore in the reciprocity dike by his Canadian annexation speech in congress. Repudiation of the agreement by Canada and England is feared and Taft and Clark are today fren- ziedly issuing statements and de- nials. It Is declared that Clark, on whom Taft depended on put- ting the bill through, has just a- bout ruined alt chances for its success m the Canadian parlia- ment. What Is conceded to ce a hard blow aimed att the tieatv was struck in the house today when Repi esentative Bennett, of New York, introduced a resolution proposing the annexation of Canada Bennett voted against the treaty when it came up for passage in the house. "The reciprocity agreement seemed to be full of contradictions which were favorable to one community and not to said Bennett, "but with Canada annexed everything would be free and all the benefits and burdens would be equally disti ibuted." President Taft was infuriated by the Bennett resolution and friends de- clare it was the result of a "double cross" given the president by the siand-patters.' Taft, however, be- lieves administration's attitude has been clearly defined and that the British government will not take this latest move on the part of his ene- mies seriously. Crane To Be Whip. WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. Following a conference between Sen- ator Crane of Massachusetts and Pres- ident Taft last night it is declared here today that Crane has been made legislative whip of the senate with orders from the president to push the Canadian reciprocity through at all costs and without an extra session if possible. Despite this plan for a vigorous ftgit, the chances the bill are not very bright The stand-patters at heart are against the measure. The progressives, with the exception of Beveridge, seem disposed to attack the measure because they want to in- clude clauses making still further tar- iff reduction And so Senator Ald- iich has evolved the scheme of hav- ing the bill reported out early by the finance committee and then niaks it appear that the progressives are kill- ing it. In the absence of both Aid- rich and Hale, the work devolves up- on Senator Burrows. The stand-nat- ters will urge action and thus put the pi ogressives "in a hole Champ Clark's "annexation" talk has stirred up a great muss. He says he was jokine but England taies seriously and Piesidcnt Taft. feeling that harm was done, endeavored to offset this b> giving out a ietter to Rejiresentathe .McCally m which he said: "I write to coneratulate you sin- cerely upon the passage through the house of the M' Call bill enactn.f into legislation the reciprocity agreement with Canada I sinceVeh hope that it will pass the senate and become a part of our statutes. JfThis agreement, if it becomes a law. has no political significance No thought of future political annexation Or union was in the mmd of the ne- gotiators on either side Canada is now and will remain a political unit. "J am very sure that if this- agree- ment becomes a law it will insure to the great social and economic benefit of both countries The president, it is said, was hope- ful that the people of the country, Canada and Gieat BiHain, will look upon tbe speech of Mr. Clark meieiy as the expression of an individual who, in the sentiment thus expressed, does not represent the demon atic party or anj party in this countn The annexation doctrine preached by Clark came in the couise of his speech in the house in favor of the a- greement He said: "I am for it, because I hope to see the day when the American flag will float over every square foot of the British North American possessions, clear to the north pole. They are people of our blood. They speak our language Their institutions are much like ours They are trained in the difficult art of self-government. My judgment is that if the treaty of 1854 had never been abrogated the chances of a consolidation of these two countries would have been much greater than they are now." llepresentative Norris said as he understood it, Mr. Clark favored the bill for at least one reason, "that it will have a tendency in the end to bring Canada into the answered Mr. Clark, "I have no doubt of it." After many years of delay the bill looking to the creation of national for- est reserves in the White Mountains and the southern Appalachians, pass- ed the senate, the standing 57 to 9. The negative vote was cast by Sen- ators Brtstow, Burton, Clark of Wy- oming, Cullom, Gronna and McCum- ber, republicans, and Senators Davis, Payntei and Shively, democrats. The bill passed the house of repre- sentatives last session, and as it wac accepted by the senate without change it lacks only the signature of the presT ident to elevate it into the statute. Over It Is Ruled, Must Be Paid Back Into The Treasury FORMER CLERKS. QF COURT HARDEST HIT Discrepancies Arise From Con- flicting Construction of Stat- utes, it Is Said, Thomas A. Edison is studying music, analyzing it as a chemist ana- IVZPS a compound made of elusue ingredients He is Investigating construction of In.' has made some discoveries. "To my surprise there is very little originality in any of he says. 'The fact is that musical compositions are full of plagarism, for example, all the waltzes are nearly alike. Most of the music writers merely take old themes and work them over, but Beethoven escapes that charge: his compositions will live always." There Will Be Nothing Slow About The Close Of Great Baby Contest For Everybody Is Working I W.ho Will Win? Saturday, Feb. 18th, will see the curtain ring down on the grand baby contest which has been in progress during the past six weeks .under tbe auspices of the Sandusky-, Star-Journ- al and the management of Mr E L" Owen and Mr W. P. Ferguson, who have been in Sandusky during the greatei sections comes word that there Is a mighty striving on the part of all the workers and the greatest hustling for the new subscriptions which mean so much at this late date and It is quite apparent that this race will not be over until the last moment of the time limit has expired. Over will have to he paid back to Erie by pres- ent and former county officials, according to the report of the stale examiners filed with Auditor Deist Thursday Morning. Tie news which percolated through the city Thursday afternoon, came us a great surprise to many peo- ple, and aroused much comment. Attorney John F. Hertlein, former county clerk, was the man hardest hit by the examiners aa they found that he had over-drawn approximately while conducting his office. Jer- ome Stolll will have to pay back to the county according to the Investi- gations of the examiners. David Ricdy, John L. oSJeger and George Oswald, the present county commissioners are held for nearly on alleged improper pyaments. 'Most of the amounts alleged to be due from the commissioners originate from 'ditch contracts in which the proper legal steps were not taken, it is claim> Lewis Nelll, former county commis- sioner, will also be required 16 make good a considerable sum. 1 E. S Stephens, former prosecuting attorney, and Herman Reuter, county sheriff ,are receiving the congratula- tions of their friends. The former, j through some error, made in favor of !the state, will receive back and 'the latter about The confusion arising from the sys- i tern of paying salaries in fees is thought to be partly responsible for j the discrepancy in several county offi- i The state axaminers, Marion Tal. I hot and E E. Hall, spent about three months in this county leaving here during the early part of January. A report of their proceedings win also be sent to the prosecuting attorney. 'There will be the devil to pay" was tbe expression used by one of the county officials in describing the situation Thursday morning. The news of the heavy amounts to be refunded to the state created a sensation in. the court house. Each of the county officials was al- lowed to see that part of the report which rcj'yrred to own office. They came in one b> one, and left the auditor's office, some with joyful and others with downcast faces. When seen Thursday morning, Au- THE WEATHER or snow to- night and Friday, warmer tonight. Temperature at 7 a. r.i 32 de- Temperature one year ago 30 grees Sun rises Friday at 6.23 a. m. and sets at 5.08 p. m. (standard 1 time 1 Maximum wind velocity for 24 hours ending at noon today 8 miles south at eight o'clock 1 Thursday morning Losing Votes But Will Pass. OTTAWA, Ont Feb. admitting Champ Clark's speech will drive away a few votes government leaders today declare that thej con- pact tli. treat) to go through paibament with a good majority and all talk of i the Canadian government repudiat- the t.caty as "the height of non- sense" Clark's speech, however, is condemned on all sides. TELLS OF PANAMA CANAL'S PROGRESS COU'MBUS, 0.. Feb hold- ing up the passage of the Dtfan municipal optnn bill in the house to- day the Cuiahoga delegation practic- ally assuied the passage of the Stock- well t'nitcd senate direct vote- bill The Dean bill cannot pass thp house without th" 7 "wet" votes fiom conu'v and the Stockwcli lull, which is strongly suppoitcd bj the df'r gates, cannot pass the senate without several votes ot the.senators who are holding out against it 'I he Dean bill is very dear those holding out against the measure and it is iikeh that the wet senators will concede the lattpr's pass- age in the hope that the delegation in th' house will support thr? Dean bill when it conies up for a The temperance committee de- cided to report out the Dean bill Fri- day morning Prcgressive democrats, backed by Governor Harmon, a decided victors fov the Oregon plan of direct election of I'nitfd States senators when, after a thiee hours' debate in, caucus, the bill drafted "by Senator! Core as a substitute for the Stockwell' bill was rejected by a of 12 to 6. The Doie bill provides a primary on election day. with no popular (reilion between party selections and no crossing of pai ty lines by legislat-, 01." Those who supported th-1 substi- i tutp wer" Senators Doie. Cetone, j Dean. Huffman, McKcp and Cahill. j rttone's -colleague The control of! tl.is in the isst caucus was dp-' t! o activit> of the governor Adjoliinment was forced by the when a motion was) pending to ieport the Stockwell bill without recommendation Friends of i Stockwll bill were nhilant I N'ext wct'k the battle will go to the j seirate floor with a motion by Stock-j well to take his hilt from tbe privi-i lege and elFrtian committee, wheic it' wrs mdpfniteU postpon-d At ifastj four republican are piedged to1 hdn the domoTatir majontv j The bill wit'i Lima and institutions waa withdrawn from the calendar i and sent bark to the committee The I Russell house bill will be pushed j Opposition to Amoving the peni-1 tpntlar; to a site developed from the goverror's office. A reported rec- ommendation that the Wertz con-1 tract labor law bo suspended tempor- al ily 15 said to have from the same source and was promptly seized upon h> representatives of labor who helped pass the law. They charged that those unfavorable to organized 'mlx'r are agitating the penitontiarv problem, hoping to kill WerU law. Col. George W. Goethals, S. NEWARK, 0 Feb 16. Clarence Tiraons, tbe third person to be placed on trial for the ijnchmg of Detectne Etbeiington heie last summer, plead- ed guilty to a charge of manslaughter toda> in court just befoie the twelfth juior in his trial was selected Judge Seward accepted the pica and will pass sentence Monday. HAD LIVED INI Aged Aunt Of Noted Inventor Died This Morning At Milan. Special to The Star-Journal' MILAN. 0. Feh For the first time in death this mornine en- tered the old Edit-on homestead w-here Thomas A Ed'son. noted Inventor, was born Mrs Simeon Edison. husband is an uncle of the died at 5 o'clock She had been in falling health for some lime and her advanced aged was against her. Mr. and Mrs Edison came here a- bout six years from Jersey City, N. J.. and have since lived in the old ____ ____ _________ _. _. ___ chief engineer of the Panama Canal, Edison home, owned by Thomas V gave an illustrated lecture this week I Edison. Mrs Edison was a member for the United States senate and, of the Episcopal church. Sue is sur- House. in which he showed the prog- 1 vived by two childien. a son Richard ress made upon the big ditch. He I Edison In Cleveland, and a daughter, c'urlared the canal will be completed i Edith Edison, of this place. by September. 1913, two sears before Funeral arrangements have not jet the time fixed., I been completed. it has already resulted in adding sev- one certain of victory as yet. nor will cral hundred new subscribers to be until the last word has newspaper, and the management of been said, the contest officially at an the Star-Journal is only too willing f end to prove this. Waste no time now in vain regrets Just Notice This Audit c'ean bfliTJf the state examiners. He is ordered to pay from one fund to another, bat will have nothing to refund to the state. The systematic manner in which the auditor and his arnstants have con- about what you did not do earlie ductad the office was praised by the mi oner 01 me coiut-si, will make or break the fortunes of >our little darling accordingly as you may take advantage of it Prom all ENTER JAIL, ROB MAN "Baby Contest" The Main Topic Wherever one goes in Erie county' shows that Is due flled ing Thursday, covers the period from January. 1905, to December, 1910. It the state all one hears talked of is this con- and to the county. (Continued on Page Twelve) KISSI.V ST. PETERSBURG. Peb 16 on this account are" bile is due from the county and 97 has been paid back to the county treasury and to ths state treasury Most of the charges against persons in small sums. WILKESBARRE, Pa.. Feb. Two masked burglars broke into the town jail at Warrior tcported today- at Vladivostok the' items Pa near here, and bursting open government has ordered the city c A. wemgates. J. P. Hert- the'doo, of the cell in wliloh Stan- quarantined. The disease is now lein. ex.clerk, C8: J G. Stoll, ley JandW the onlv prisoner, was claimlns; one hundred deaths daily at. confined, robbed him at the point "uncnuu. of a revolver of cause of a case of pneumonic plaiige The follow ing are the considerable. (Continued on Page Six.) SON OF PRESIDENT STUDIES OHIO BAR A remarkable record was established sengers. handled would have been aag- m this United States %eamboat m- by at least last sum- A mer federal officials declare jspection district, which includes I Augtm and of dm ing 1910. Not a single course, were the biggest months in the passenger lost life on steamship i passenger buslnes in this district. phinK in the district and according j During these months the report shows to the report of Inspectors Potter and I l.lUi'874 peisons crossed the gang- Plietz. which has just been completed i plankj. at Toledo, there were 1.2S2.H5 persons i Dining August and Septem- canied on passenger boats in the dis- trict This number was in ex- ber persons rode on naphtha launches, rented for hire, while in the Robert Taft. son of President Taft, now a law student in Harvard, with a course before him. appar- ently intends to take up the practice o( law in Ohio Frank E. McKean, clerk of the supreme court, received a letter from Robert Taft. asking a copy of tho laws aad regulations governing bar examinations in Ohio. Taft Is a grad- uate of Yale, and hat been In the Harvard law school tor a year. cess of thp ltd? fleiircs when a new second and fourth quaitere the figure record was established. H is reason-' and W respectively, making able to believe that boats in, a total of 37.740 This likewise between Sanduskj and snia-hes all pnnious records to Cedar Poin' and plvmg between While ouh four lives of men, and the islands, cairied moie pas-! Ployed on boats were lost in senders than those entering any other trict last >ear. 21 was the toll for W09. port in tbe dlstiict, Toledo not ex- During Win four men wore saved frett drcwnmg by the efficient of the Thf distinct, of which Toledo is Caving apparatus. The report com- hcadquart-rs. f xterdi for a distance mends this feature of the equipment iof 68 miles along Lake Ene. as far of craft of all kinds. east as Vermilion. Charles Potter, in- Differences in the figures of tM ispector of huli.s and F propert> loss in the Toledo Plletz inspector of boilers are in tion district in 1910 as compared wttll 1909 is almost remarkable LOK by It V a rule of the government that collision of vessels last year monfM passenger craft must report their pas- to and from inlmMRCOW senger lists to the port whereat they causes, such as eiploskm of Iwlfcn. secure the most business. This ap-' sinking of ships, ew., luw ww nlles to the steamers Alpena. City of 316-M. making a totnl of Kl.HS.af. Mackinae. Owana. Kirby and other' tn 1909 the property low 'boats If the captains of these It amounted to It ere were permitted to flle their state- ceeded the 1810 loss by HM.lll.lt. ments at the Toledo and Sandwky i due U> nuatwr ot customs oflct the number of marine lEWSPAPERr NEWSPAPER!   

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