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Sandusky Star Journal: Saturday, February 11, 1911 - Page 1

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   Sandusky Star Journal, The (Newspaper) - February 11, 1911, Sandusky, Ohio                               LAST EDITION THE SANDUSKY STAR-JOURNAL. FORTY-FOURTH YEAR SANDUSKY, OHIO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY NUMBER 106 'FLIES ABOVE CITY LEADS FIGHT FOB THE OREGON PLAN Hamilton, at Juarez, Convinces Officers of the Value of Bird-Men. IGEN. OROZCO OFF TO MEET GEN. NAVARRO definite News As to Location ol i Federal Troops Makes Battle Possible, EL PASO, Tex., Feb. That the aeroplane Fs of great worth in the army for scouting purposes was admitted by army officials to- day following the feat yesterday of Charles K. Hamilton in flying Jtwez and making minute observation of the fortifications. "I was feet in the air all the time and flying at the rate of 50 miles an hour" said Hamilton, following Ms flight. "It would have bran almost impossible for a rnladle of any kind to have hit me." Mai EL PASO, Feb. The flrst defi- nite news of the whereabouts of General Navarro and his federal forces was learned today when word JVAS received from him at San Jose, 73 miles south of Juarez, that he is fighting his way north but ts being harassed continually by the rebels When the news of his whereabouts reacheds the rebaFcsmpT-fSeneral Or- izeo immediately flirted south to mee! Navarro and it Is almost certain t battle between them will take place today. It is reported that General Orozco is to be displaced by General Soto. General Blanco is still operating in- dependently. Picks Rebels to Win LIMA, O., Feb. Mexican Insurrectos will defeat General Navar- ro is my belief, and If they do, they tan take Juarez at will and whem they do this their cause will have been This was the statement of Dr. E. ID. Sinks, who left the camp of the ftfexican rebel chieftain, General Oro- zoo, less than a week ago to bring his wife to this city from El Paso, Texas Dr. Sinks was with the rebels In the capacity of surgeon for the past weete. says Orozco has Juarez at his mercy for Says and rebel sympathiz- ers cannot understand his failure to attack. General Blanco, however, is the genius of the insurrection, ac- cording to the returned Ohioan. Honduran Compromise. SAN JOSE, Costa Rica, Carlos Alyberto TJcles, Honduras Member of the Sartago peace court, has teen agreed upon as a compromise preaidifit at a teonfewnce Vtween President Davlla and General Bon- ilia, who is heading the Honduran revolution, on board the American cruiser Tacoma, according to dispatch- es received here. Hugh L. Nichols, chairman of the democratic executive1 committee, ha- gone to the rotiet of Governor Harmon in his fight to pass the Stockwell "Ore- gon plan direct election ol senators bill." Farmers Condemn Measure After Hearing President Taft's Strong Argument SENATE ACTION UNLIKELY New Cry Raised By Regulars Against Extra Session, Fear- ing Steel Trust Probe, BEPEATS ARGSUJfESTS SPBIN6FIELD, 111, Feb. President Tuft today made his sec- end big speech in favor of his Can- adian reciprocity treaty before the Illinois legislature. It was large. ly a repetition el the arguments made at Columbus yesterday, bnt was more enthusiastically re ceiled. Rebels Executed. COLUMBUS, O., Feb. ap- ical of President Taft to farmers in }ehalf of the Canadian reciprocity agreement fell upon deaf ears here. The president was cordially received and respectfully heard at the Nation- al Corn show but before he left the city some 300 farmers adopted a reso- lution condemning the agreement and predicting that it would injure the farmers. The president in his speech declared the fear of reduced farmland values was unfounded and that the American farmer would not bp injured by the advantage to the Canadian farmer. In a mass of statistics, special stress was laid on Canada's inability to corn- corn production because' of CAPE HAYTIEN, Feb. eral P.hjmpiimvt. and General Mich- _. ael fshort season- There was evi. were both captured and at; wora1 of the declaration, once executed, according to messages I The President, in closing, said: "Let received here today. It is believed tne ,bp mtn this will end the revolution I Deration and in six months the j farmers of the border who now have fears will rejoice m this great step closer business and social re- lations with our neighbors Thy whole countrj, farmer, mamifactmer, lailroacl company, middleman, ware- house man. all will be the gainer." The possibility of an extra session of the new congress was not touched REPUBLICAN LEADER TARGET OF ASSASSIN BARCELONA, Feb. attempt to assassinate Alexander Ijerroui, on publican leader, was made on the streets heie today when five shots the'reg'uTar republicans are using tht were fired at him by an u as- sailant. None took effect. According to Washington aduce: (Continued on Page Six FOR THE PERRY BILL majority of the committee and stands a good chance of passage attiiufe the prudent will take WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. on the matter is do.ibtf.il It is in di-1 THE WEATHER Forecast Snjvv or ra'n tonight Sunday, rising temperature. TPniperatuie at 7 a. m 17 de- Tempcratuie one year ago, 16 degrees. Sun IISPS Sundaj at 6 29 a. m and sets at 5.02 p m rises Mon- dav at 6 a. m and sets at 5.03 p m. (standard tirnf.) Maximum wind velocitv for 24 hours ending at noon today. 12 miles southwest at 11 o'clock" Sat- urday morning. Protest Is Entered and Later House Sergeant-at-Arms Is Rebuked. DEAN OPTION BILL DELAY "Wets" Are Said To Need Five Out of Eight Doubtful Members, S LATEST CLAIM; Police, However, Have Infor- mation To The Contrary, It is Asserted THINK WEALTHY MAN HIRED GHOULS' BAND Evidence That Search Was Made for a Certain Casket, Possibly to Get Jewels. STAR-JOURNAL BUREAU, Dispatch Building. COLUMBUS, 0., Feb. Vining's first attempt to make 'the house work on Friday can hardly be said to have proved a shining success yesterday. He managed to muster 97 members present, but doubtless the presence of President Taft in Colum- bus had the eftect ot Keeping many here who otherwise would have gone to their homes. But even with that large number present members having bills on the calendar were unwilling to let them go to a One member, Mr. Calvey of Cleve- land, suffered from the rule that an author of a bill who is not present when his bill is reached for third read- ing will be punished by having the bill sent to the foot of'the calendar and as the result Calvey's street car vesti- bule bill now occupies that unenviable position. Only a quisk move by Price Russell, the democratic leader, to ad- journ, which carried, saved another bill by the same author from the same fate. That was his full freight crew 11 which fallowed on the calendar. The first lobby cry from. tji> floor of the house was morn- ing. Fellinger of Cuyahoga made it. He protested to the speaker against permitting lobbyists to call members Erom their seats while the house was in session His complaint was direct- ed principally to James A. Rice, of Canton, one of the speakers for the Irys at the Dean bill hearing, who was n the hall, hut also had reference to lobbyists for the county officers' asso- elation who were opposing the sage of the Leathers bill restricting :he salaries of county commissioners, which was on the calendar for third reading. The compensation of commission- ers is based on the grand duplicates of .the counties and as the grand dupli cates are being enormously increased under the full valuation of real estate and the low tax rate the salaries of commissioners will be doubled, trebled or Quadrupled if the law stands as it s. Mr. Leathers' bill limits the salar- es to what the commissioners were laid in 1910. On motion of the mem- >er from Madison, Mr. Jenkins, the bill was recommitted to the fees and salaries committee. i Speaker Vining paid no attention to he lobby complaint of Mr. Fellinger ERIE, Pa Feb announce- ment that no bcdies were taken from the Scott mausoleum here, all having been found, has not in any way clear- ed up the mystery of the despoiling oJ the tomb. That the breaking into the mausoleum and tampering with the caskets was tne work of hired ghouls in the employ of a man of considerable wealth and some posi- tion, is the latest thecry of the detec- tives employed by the Scott family. Members of the family and the de- tectives gave out the word that no body is missing Despite this, infoi- mation credited bv the Ene police is that the body ot Mi s. William L. Scott, nf the cnginal head of the fam- ily and builder o' mausmeum, has been stolen and that this fact is kept by the detectives. This infor- "police from two down the arms for permitting persons to pass n and out while a call of the house in progress. On both sides of he legislature the rule against lobbj- sts has been ignored at his session and the lobbyists are get- ing pretty bold again. The Dean bill will come from the lommittee with recommendation fo, confidential sources. One is the state- ment of a man who is represented to have had sufficient influence to pass the police guard who have guarded the mausoleum siuce it was closed by members of the family boon after the robbery was The theory for the robbery of the mausoleum on which the Peikins de- tective agency is at work is that the ghouls planned to carry off the bones of William L. Scott, millionahe rail- road man, which have been in the mausoleum twenty years, and hold them for ransom. They believe that the crjpts containing bodies of the other members of tbe family were opened in a search for toe bones of Scott and that they were kept from completing their task bj- lack, and t Scott crypt. F. of Plttsburg and F. C. Schindle of New York, who head the Burns agancj here, announce as their theory that the motive for the desecration of the mausoleum was a search for jewels supposed to have been buried with the bodies of Mrs McCullom or Mrs Scott. In sup- port of this theorj they point to the fact that the caskets of the two wo- were tho only ones opened. Crjpts containing the other bodies were broken open and the name plates hooked out with a jimmy or other in- struments In such each case as soon as the name plate revealed that the casket contained the bones of a man the work on that crypt ended. Eveij circumstance within the mau- soleum points to the certainty that the ghouls were searching for some spec- ial casket or caskets. WHAT WAS MYSTERIOUS MOTIVE OF DESPOILERS nrflni T D! OF THE TOMB OF MILLIONAIRE SCOTT AT ERIE? I till Lt I Lt The upper picture shows the despoil ed mausoleum from which it was thought the body of William L. Scott, the millionaire builder, or some of his relatives, had been taken. Mrs. Thorna Strong Ronalds, beautiful daughter of Scott, called in the police and detectives to work on the case. TttRS. THOSA SOTSCW3 'J2CKALDS Meeting Tonight Expected To Result in Definite Steps For Tax Relief. AUDITOR CONFIDENT PLAN WILL SATISFY Proposed Horizontal Reduction And New Equalization Would Be Effective HARRY THAW'S BIRTHDAY NEW YORK, Feb. Mairv Kendall Thaw, the star bccrder for the criminal insane at Mattea- wan, will celebrate first birthday forty- (Continued on Page Six.) u few HI ;uiis Thaw will have rounded out five years behind prison b-irs as a result of the u i the Madison Square Roof Garden on that night in June. TV hen he shot and i! L5 antord White He has nrv. been at the Matteawan in- stitiition neaily tlnee >ears and prior to being taken tbeie he had passed two years in the Tombs Contestants Will Work Hard Up To The Last Minute While It Has Been a Busy Day For The Manager. Contestants will be received at the he or she will have a neat little bank office of The Sanduskj Star-Jo.irna! account besides the coveted ,itle of on Water street up until 9 o clock to- night All workers who want to t.iKe rdvantagp of that tremendous offer -lo'ih'f must rio so before Not in many a day has more general satisfaction been exprete- ed than over the action of the exe- cutive committee of the Buslneta Men's association and County Au- ditor Deist in arranging for a con- ference Saturday evening to con- sider the tax value problem and arrange for a mass 'meeting of property owners as announced In Friday's Star-JournaJ. It ia the belief of most business men and others viho talked of the matter that it will be possible to secure relief and equity through this pro- ceeding. Whether or not Auditor Deist's suggestion of a horizontal reduction of ten per cent m valuations will be fol- -tewed, ont that this would mike some values too low and give relief where none is ask- ed, while the inequalities would sttll exist. On the other hand" it is urged that such a general reduction conhl be made and the inequalities adjust- ed afterward, the review board reduc- ing the figures vvheie they would still remain too high, and adding to the low valuations. Oue business man secured from the records at the couit house the figures applying to property of members qt the board of review and found that in the case of each member, the tax- es to be paid under a one per cent limit, and at the new high valuation, will be somewhat lower than the tax- es now being paid. He argued tfcfe- if every property owner could say'as much there could be no objection to the high valuations. The' complaint is that many property owners find their valuations so enormously In- creased as to add considerable to Uwfr taxes. It resolves itself back to tip same tbe yalnattons have, in hundreds of made much higher than the actual cash or market value. The figures show that Dan Knui, of the review board, has been paying 50 taxes on his residence on Co- lumbus avenue and under tie new valuation, will pay at a one per cent limit, 29. an increase of. OB the. Kunz flat building he has beea paying a year but under the new valuation of he will pay but 56, a saving of This Is a net reduction of on his property Paul Miller has been paying a vear on his Columbus avenue resi- dence and under the new valuation will pay 547.09, an increase of On the Johnson Miller property on. Me'gs street he has paid and undei the new valuation will par a saving of His net saving will be 51 cents. Charles A Lehrer's home on borne street. mvnpH hy his was taxed 53842 and under the new valuation the tax will be can ou the nffei is a !I taxpayers would these How to get tha those duiiblo otes as most cxiractaiiuuy one ARMY OF SUFFRAGISTS BESIEGES OP LAWS AT ILLINOIS STATE CAPITAL A meeting of the Ohio delegation has been called for this evening to discJSfi ways and means of bringing the Perry Centennial bill to the attention of congress. Webster P. Huntmgton, secretary a of the commission, will preside at ft the meeting. Michael Mahaney and A. C. Dumont of Fostorla and Bert Moore of Fremont art in Washing- ton and saw Representative An- derson today. trfct va'ianc? vvitn his policy of econ- t omy A number of members of con- gress believe that it will be a mistake t to pass" e'ther the Sitllowav or Mc- Cumber bilh, and suggest Thit the, I Or.n-1 Arm- blil be substituted They I point out that thi1 president will be 1 iiKrh t-i veto the grand army bill I than either the Sullovvay or McCum- i ber bill, neither of which has the offl- c.al approval of the Grand Army. Theie is also in the realm of pos- sibilities a chance fcr-at tbe pension bill rnav be killed at this session. This possibility is entiieh dependent upon the decision of the supreme court in trie corporation tax case. A total of   the house, and aid it if the sunreme ttj IfcCumber bill, eairvins fllh s the constft'Sit oT the corporation tax law but a decis- i u is nraciicci ly certain that the Sal- ioa of the tax to loway bill will not ac m its bp wouH mean that I present form Some iadic.il change TROUT The first of a series of weekly visits da5 will be ,-n.Pited Mond.i> on the Thc pictures of the dear little dar- double vote offer. hiv- winch have in cnrtost has been the The Stai-Journal for the past several busiest man n SaudusUy today and lem for tlie Business lien's Associa- tion committee and Deist to lonsidei at their meeting .Saturday t.PMns at 7 o'clock in the eiybody who has a little darling in great iaw is iaKmg aihantage ot" double And ft is worth taking .dvantage of, too Your f fforts this week will sn a long tow aid win- ning one of those sold to be awarded to tho most popular babes of (Continued on Page 7) REPORT SAYS TROOP Personal contact with about a han- f'red tiixpaj ers Saturday morning .convinced Auditor Deist that a hor- Iizontal reduction of 10 or 15 per cent Ur- ftgtm plai ed bv the board of review would TRANSPORT HAS SUNK ______________ "The proposed reduction wouH ,T. F Fh demands of a" out two Erie county and vic.nity on Fcbiuary tnoj me munition to Yemen, wrere the na- arc hnldmg their property at a very tues are in ipvolt, is repoH-'U to have nisn he concluded. snnA- m thc Red Sea with all board. You still o eral hours in to work. Don't quit just be- cause you made one report to the contest manager Remember :hat every new subscription turned in tonight will count just double what it I would under ordinary circumstance'; Mako the round of -.our friend? and if >ou can't reilizo on of thogp have Men made you Rerpp'rhpr thaf you have up until 9 o'clock to erab off some more of those double Have >ou In unir own sub- scription1' If not. do FO at nn'e You harfllj oxppct friends to J work for your bain unless you nu" forth some little effort yourself Do j you know that vom own i for one year, if turned In to-' night will net >ou eighteen thousand And you are subscribing fort newspaper second to none in this j part of the state. You owe H to >ouri little cherub to do some effective work, in this interesting competition j If you make the little one a winner met rrmsivG. SERVED AS A MAN IN WAR, SEEKS PENSION LONDON. Feb 1 f.rtin-1. foreis .ei-. b to todtty The prints sibie foi the plague -Another boxer M HI Cli.ua a- udtlliuE priests, s if Tived beie telliiit; iht na- are respon- SHERIDAN, Feb. on record to apply for an army r-onsion because of actual ser- in the cml appeared Mrs Louisa E. Bliss mads i aophcai tin, alleging that she dressed a -nan and was sent on many igeious missions during the war. W1L EASE NONES OF EAST ENDERS; i IRE NIGHIFI ALARM BLASTS COMICS UNPOPULAR The of the good in [John Bing instructed Chief EntdaeM the East End, especially those rosid-' Phillips of the water works pozDptttf Ing in the vicinity of the water works i station, of changes in tbe pumping station, are on the jagged! program. Hereafter, the whittle edge They have awake not to be sounded for tirw Among the women actively engaged u V> asd favor amoL'c the, NEW YORK, Feb old- nights, nervously awaiting the shrill the hours of 8 o'clock 11 the fashioned "comic" valentines blast of 'he fire whistle. Oi if. per-. and 5 o'clock In the mcwnl which showed signs of passing a chance, they fell Into a sweet slum-1 curfew will be blown at UMt Ml year ago. will be almost com- ber, they were sure to be awakened but Engineer pletely missing on Feb 14 this by these same shrill blasts announc- Wholesale distributors here j ing a fire somewhere in the city. But no more. There will be quiet nights in tee East End henceforth save for milder blasts of the curfew whistle. Following consultation with May- or Lehrer and Safety Director Hanser Saturday morning, Set vice Dtrtctbr mt 4M Mon fe 1 structed tbat er than hare twti past to tto a. m. flre alarm li to be dlaeoBtlaaed. Tbe follow follow mMOTWI to dtr NEWSPAPER!   

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