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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 31, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 31, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II. NO. 309. INDIAN WAH More Than 1OO Reds Killed at Wounded Kuee Creek. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31. 1890. TWO CENTS. Colonel Forsythe Reports the Loss ol Tweiity-five Men and Thirty- four Wounded. Auother Battle Fought and Thirty-three Of Two Strike's Warriors Go to the Happy Hunting Geounds. Panic Among the at Pine Ridge Affency, They Being Surrounded by Five Thousand EUSHVILLE, Nob., Doc. scatter- ing fire at long range was kept up most of Monday night between Two Strike's band, from the heights north west of the agency, and the troops. This com- menced upon the arrival of a Ninth cav- alry troop from Colonel Henry's com- mand in the Bad Lands. The casualties DISASTROUS A Brewery Wall Injartafl Twelro Workmen, Oae of Builders, NEW YORK, Dec, 31. The bisr brew- ery of Herman Koehler, occupying the whole block at First avenue between Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth streets, was tho scene Tuesday afternoon of disastrous calamity while in progress of reconstruction. The southeast wall fell in. The firemen succeeded in extricat- ing all of the workmen from the ruins. Of the forty who were at work twelve were injured, one of whom died at the hospital later in the afternoon. No one was killed outright. Three foremen of the of work- men have been placed under arrest, charged with being criminally responsi- ble for the accident. They are Joseph Turner, foreman of tho bricklayers and masons; William Williams, foreman of the housesonths, and Adam Ackorman, foreman of the joiners. Tumor and Williams are locked up, while Acker- man, who is among the injured, is under guard at Ballevue Hospital. The acci- dent, was apparently caused by the care- London, England, Visited by an'! Republican Speak Immense Blaze. Nearly Worth of Property in the Business Quarter Consumed. and Against It. Mr. Hoar Urges Its Passage. While the Colorado Senators Argue in Opposition. thus far reported are oae soldier killed iessness of .the builders in furnishing supports which proved too weak for the and one wounded. At four a. m. an at- tempt was made by Two Strike's band to capture the Ssventh cavalry's supply train returning from the buttle at Wounded Knee. Upon hearing the shots the troops made a dash, routed the reds and killed thirty-throe of them. Hundreds of settlers have taken refuge here in the churches and court room. OMAHA, Neb., Dec. For- sytho reached Pine Ridge Agency yes- The Western Men of the Opinion That Measures for Financial Relief Much Greater Importance, and Should be Patted at Once. WASHINGTON, Deo. the Senate was called to order Tuesday morning there was such a small attendance thai atten- tion was called to the absence of a Quorum. The roll call showed the presence of seventeen Senators, and the sergeant-at-arms was directed to request the attendance of absentees. It was eleven o'clock before a quorum was secured. The galleries, however, were crowded witn" vis- itors, principally excursionists from among the public school teachers or New York and Phila- delphia. v During She long wait there suddenly came from ona or the galleries a general handclap- ping as a slsn of Impatience that the perform- ance was so glow to begin. It was quietly re- buked by the Vice'President anrt there was no repetition of such a violation of Senatorial de- work demanded of thorn. THKEE BOLD BANDITS. Men Who Held L'p the Snnth Chicago Itanlc Wore Also Engaged la Aa- otlier Darin? Crime. CHICAGO, Dec. of Police Marsh feels confident that in the three desperadoes under arrest for robbing the South Chicago bank on Monday, he terday with the SeTenth cavalry and the surviving prisoners. He reports twenty-five of his men killed and thirty- lour wounded in the fight Monday on Wounded Knee creek. General Brooke has since the fight revoked his order for to carry prisoners south under guard. WASHINGTON, Dec. Gen- eral Schofield yesterday afternoon re- ceived the following telegram from General Miles, at Hermosa, S. D.: "Colonel Forsytha says sixty-two dead Indian men were counted on the plain where the attempt was made to disarm Big Foot's band, and where the fight be- gun on other'parts of the ground were eighteen men. Six were brought in badly wounded and six others were with a party of twenty-three men and women which Captain Jackson had to abandon when attacked by about 150 Bruie In- dians from the agency. "This comments General Brooke, "for ninety-two men killed and leaves but few alivo and unhurt The and children broke for the hills when tho fight commenced and compar- atively few of them were hurt and few brought in. Thirty-nine are here, of TrtrictrnumBef'txrotity-6'Tie" are wounded. Had it not been for the attacks by the Brules, an accurate accouut would have been made, but the ravines were not searched afterwards. I think this shows very little apprehension from Big Foot'3 band in the future. A party of forty ia reported as held by the scouts at the head of Mexican Creek. These consist of all sizes and the cavalry from Rose- bud will bring them in if it is true." "These says General Miles, "under Big Foot were the most desper- ate. There wore thirty-eight of the re- mainder of the Cheyenne river band and thirty that broke away from Hump's following when he took his band and the Sitting Bull Indians to Fort Ben- nett, making in all nearly 160 warriors. "Before leaving their camps on the Cheyenne river thoy cut up their har- ness, damaged their wagons and started south for the Bad Lands, evidently in- tending not to return, but to go to war. The troops wero placed between them and the Bad Lands and they never suc- ceeded in join-ing the hostiles there. All their movements were intercepted and their severe loss at the hands of the Seventh cavalry may be a wholesome lesson to the othor Sioux." RAPID Crrr, S. D., Doc. reigns supremo between here and the camp of the troops. Settlers are fleeing in all directions to escape the impend- ing massasre, and the roads are crowded with terror-stricken women and chil- dren. In the vicinity of Pine Ridge Agency the greatest fear prevails. Five thousand Sioux are encamped in a circle around tho agency buildings and if aa uprising occurs, as now sterns only too probable, nothing can save from an awful death the corporal's guard of in- fantrymen sent from Omaha to guard the ranch. Every succeeding boar makes danger more imminent. Desultory firing Mon- day night on the outskirts of the asrancy warned tbe defenders of tbe agency buildings that their hours of safety numbered. Little Wound and Two Strike, inflamed to a vengeful passion by the news of Big Foot's fatal treach- ery, are reported to be massing their bands for instant attack. The Indian police already have had livclysklrmish- ing with tbe hostiles in tbe vicinity of the school building. If an attack is made the result willbe the instant destruction of the entire camp, as all tbe buildings are of wood and in an almost defenseless condition. Every thing i- for upon tbe arri- val of General w'no is on his way to the scene of danger. A pamc also prevails at Rathwra. but it is thought the railroad towss ar.? not at present ia danger. has the men who perpetrated the Aller- ton robbery and who knocked down and robbed an old man a week or so ago near the stock yards. "Tbe description given by Allerton's messengers of the men who attacked them fits Feather- stone, alias Hennessey, and Bennett ex- said the chief, "and we are in hopes that we have theganglockedup." One of the robbers, which one the po- lice will not say. was yesterday identi- fied as the man who hired the horse and buggy used in the Allerton robbery. All the thieves will bs arraigned before a justice of the peace to-day. WILL GO OOT_OP BLAST. Furoaoemen In the Blahoalne and She- Banco Valleys Will Shut for an Indefinite Torlod. PITTSBURGH. Dec. iron fur- nace proprietors in the Mahoning and Shenango valleys held an important meeting in Youngstown, O., yesterday and resolved that on January 10 they will close down their furnaces indefi- nitely. Twenty-three furnaces wero represented. The operators claim that awing to the high railroad tariffs and the present cost of coke they are unable to continue work except at ahoavy loss. Tho coke operators recently reduced tbe price of coke twenty-five cents per ton, hoping to assist the furnacemen, but the latter insisted upon a greater reduction, which the coke manufactur- ers claim they can not concede. "THROW UP YOUK Startling Demand by a Trio or Train Kobbera Who Accomplished Their Object an 1 Escaped. Ind., Doc. train No. 18, Chicago to Louisville, reached Seventh street station in this city yes- terday, three strange men boarded it and went through the day coach. "Throw up your thoy cried to the passengers. As the coach was full of ladies who were local passengers, but little attention was paid to them. Frank Surton, an Indianapolis traveling man, attempted to show resistance, but was overpowered and robbed of S200 in cash. But few observed what was ?oing on un- til the work was done and the robbers jad escaped. Officers are in pursuit with but little hope of overtaking the ntfoa of NASHVILLE, Tens.. Dec. 3L Tbe Modern Laaeuaee Association of the United States beeaa a session of twa days at VaaderbiU Caiversitr yester- day. Tbe is larjrelv attended. taany of tbe prominent coliej men in the Caited participating in tbe deliberations. i ia Paraell aad Jfc- CTBriea set bere Tuesday aad bad vrdoaged con versa .ion, wiicb will rwmoed in a few days. Tbe conference very aaiajated. telegrams beiag constaattj dispatcbed to Eaflaad aa4 Iielaad aad aaswen beiaff rwetvwL of the Firemen Greatly Impeded by Extremely Cold Weather. LONDON, Dec. terrific confla- gration broke out yesterday on Queen Victoria and Thames streets, intersect- ing thoroughfares in the great business quarter of the city. A large number of warehouses wore on fire and the flames spread rapidly. Fourteen engines re- sponded to the first alarm. A high wind which prevailed rendered futile the ef- forts of the firemen to prevent the spread of the flames or even keep the raging elements under any sort of con- trol. A large paper warehouse, a num- ber of fancy goods stores and the Gulch- er engineering works were destroyed. and the great fur emporium of Revillon of Frederick T Dubots Freres was greatly damaged. The fire worked out toward tho build- ing occupied by the offices of the Salva- tion Army. An enormous throng of peo- ple assembled here gave the police plenty of work in keeping them back from danger from crumbling masonry. As the flames shot out toward the Salva- tion Army quarters they played across and illuminated the great sign in front of the building, which "bears the legend: "Blood and Fire." The high wind finally subsided and, this, added to the almost superhuman efforts of the firemen who manned the twenty-nine engines at work prevented the ignition of the Salvation Army headquarters. No reports have been re- ceived at either police or fire headquar- ters of loss of life as a consequence ot the conflagration. The phenom'enallyoold weather great- ly hampered the efforts of the firemen, the water freezing in the engines and many of tha men having their hands and other parts of their bodies frozen. The hosemen had to be lashed to the ladders, their hands being so benumbed that they could not grasp the supports. The total loss placed at The heaviest individual loss is that of Re- villon Freres, the wholesale furriers. Thoy had just imported a stock of seal- skins valued at Later esti- mates place the loss to Revillon Freres at Their stock of furs was valued at Half the stock was j totally destroyed and the remainder i damaged. Whi e a large portion of the fire brig- ade was 'iff '.oaftil'ng-witQ too fire in Queen Victoria street, another serious conflagration was raging in the suburb of Hackney, sixteen engines be- ing engaged in the attempt to subdue it The property destroyed in this locality was the works of Corliss, Capel Leon- ard, benzoline refiners and naphtha dis- tillers. There were gallons of spirits stored in tanks underneath the buildings and while the fire was in progress several of these exploded with great force, injuring a number of per- sons and terrorizing the population of the vicinity. The shock of the explo- sion was plainly felt at points in Lon- don five miles distant. The works were entirely destroyed, together with some adjacent buildings. The loss is very heavy. _______________ Counterfeiter and Ontflt Captured. CHICAGO, Dec. Koch was arrested late Monday night on a charge of counterfeiting. He was turned over to the secret service officials. Koch'a house wai searched and a complete set of stamps and dies were found. They were of superior manufacture, and ca- Mirror of Recent Happenings li Ohio. Stat DIED SUDDENLY. Senator Zimmerman SoccumlM to LATEST Gathered by Tc of I'rwm rt h. ITE.M3. Putt All DM KMiiKR 31. Madame Evraud, vrifn of Michael raud, the murderer of Tous- saint has born granted Dr. C. II. of i; lieonar- rested, ohar-roJ with by Agnes lluohcock. T.ie doctor on bail. Captain William Mills, Company A. Second infa-nry, on du'-v at Pino ttidge, WOOSTEK, O., Doc. Hon. John Zimmerman, of this city. State Senator from the Seventeenth Twenty-eighth! S- D., died there recently o! rheumatism district, died in the street Monday night I of the heart of heart disease. Ho was on his way The IV-sMont has aistned theeomoiis- Killed an Electric Wire. PHILADKI.PIIIA, Dec 31. Samuel Kerns suffered death yesterday in a. most terrible fonts, the current of an electric light wire passing through his body. Senator from Idaho for the term beginning March 4, 1891, were presented und referred. Mr. Reagan gavo notice of two amendments lo Mr. Aldrloh's oloture resolution. The Senate then resumsd consideratio of the Elections bill and Mr. Hoar continued his speech In Its advocacy He reminded Southern Senators that they had pledged their oJloiul oaths and honor as men that they would Rive thalrdevotion to the constitutional amendments IT they wore only let back into their old condi- tion In the Union, free from the consequences of rebellion. And now th.y were denouncing those constitutional amendments as "a stu- pendous crime and blunder Mr. Wolcott foiiy weu Mr. Hoar In nn animated speech against the bill. He held the attention O) the Senate from the first sentence to the 1 '6U It was. he said, a source of irre.it regret to him to be called upon to differ with any considerable number of his party, and to decline to take tbe path the older leaders pointed out It was proper that the reasons which impelled that reason be stated. The time which the bill engrossed was not opportuns. Nearly one-third of the session was through, and daylight was not yet visible. There were before the Senate measures of vast importance that would full for another year unless they were now acted upon. Among the measures awaiting action, Mr. Wolcott mentioned the Silver bill, the Appor- tionment bill, the Pure Food bill, the Copy- right bill and the Private Land Court bill. We stand, he said, in the shadow of a great finan- cial disaster. The people turn to Congress for relief. They want assurance either that there will be no legislation on the financial subject (so that they oun their houses In or- or that they will receive an adequate me- dium of circulation. But that was not alone the reason ho opposed the bill. He believed the pending hill should not become a law be- cause" it involved Federal interference and espionage at other than National elections, and this was contrary to the spirit of American in- stitutions and an obstacle to the enjoyment of American 1'bertles. It was tetter th.it local ;ind S'ate elections In New York City should bo attended by fraud and dishonesty thun that they should be kept pure by Federal interference. In Colorado Federal interference had beou tried under Democratic officers and a fair Judge, but it had been aban- doned. Mr. Wolcott said the people of country wanted no more civil it would be Impossible to enforce such a law asjainsttUauoUed opposition of the wbito pop- ulation in tho Southern States. The attempt would brtns back the old days of terrorizing and the waker race would sutler Mr. Teller made a speech ag.ilnst tbe Elec- tions bill which he thought was belug kept bo- fore the Senato to prevent financial legislation. Mr. Teller called attention to the fact that under the clottfre rule there would be no oppor- tunity to offer amendments to tbe bill, and in this view he opposed it. He then denounced tbe Finance Committee's bill as a Wall street measure. the chaplain had delivered a brief prayer, and after the journal of the last day's session had been read and approved, the House adjourned until Friday. home in company with Hon. K. li. Esh- eltnan, when he complained of fooling unwell. He was given a chair and a messenger dispatched Tor a carriage. While he was being assisted into the conveyance ho gave one gasp, dying without uttering a word. Ho was born In 1S29, at Richon, Grand of Ba- den, Prussia, and came to America in 1845. He was quite wealthy. Senator Zimmerman represented the combined Seventeenth and Twnnty- oighth oi Knox, Morrow, llolui.-s and in the Stau- S'dato, binng olocfcod in ISSy by a majority of over his Re- publican opponent, Robert J. Cunning- ham. Senator Zimmerman's death leaves the Democrats in tho Sonato without a quorum. 0 Doc. Campbell stated yoiturday that he would probablv orli'r a spoclal election in the district of tno latj Senator Zimmerman on January 1, tho election to bo hold two weeks later. The deal Senator will bo buriod JT WAS An pable of turning out an excellent class move Burned. DAYTON, Deo. two o'clock Tuesday morning the Gem City Stove Works were entirely destroyed by fire, caused by an explosion of natural gas within the building. The smell of es- caping gas was perceptible for several days, and during Monday night the building became filled with it and the explosion resulted. The firemen wore powerless, as the flow of gas could not be checked, and great jets were blazing forty feet high all through the struc- ture. Loss, fairly well insured. Three Train Sentenced. TROY, N. Y., Dec. Reed, convicted of attempted train wrecking of work. The stamps and dies were at Greenbush, September 4, was brought gauged for the manufacture of quarters I into court yesterday and sentenced to and dimes. During the last few weeks the North Side has been flooded with Kerns was fixing a crane on the roof oi counterfeit dimes and quarters and bun- one of the buildings of the Baldwin Lo- comotive Works he thoughtlessly grasped an electric light wire. Instant- ly he was thrown down, his body twitched convulsively as the fluid passed through it, and in a moment his agony was over, although it was some time before his remains were taken from contact with tbe wire. One Rescued, Seven Drowned. Dec. schoon- er A. D. Lamson, which arrived here Tuesday, brought Charles Wallenber- ger, the sole survivor of tho crew of the Lucinda C. Potter, from Boston for Norfolk, which consisted of eight men. The Potter capsized Sunday off Barne- gat and five were drowned. Tbe cap- tain and the two remaining- sailors gained a lodging a portion of the vessel's house, but two of them from exposure. Tbe Lamson found the wreck Sunday night and sent a boat tc take off the men. Murdered by nit Employer. Pa.. At Claring- ,his county, Monday. Edward S. a of tbe firm of Ship- pen Bros., hi-xber dealers, shot and in- stactiy killed -T. W. Say, one of the em- ployes of tbe Srro. Bad blood was en- gendered by Say coming to wo-k late and bein? sharply reprimanded by Ship- pen. Say worked till noon and tncn went U. iiio Srrs'g c-Cice ar.-i demanded bis money. In settling accounts tae dis- pute was renewed, during which wardered tnan struck Sbiopea. dreda of complaints reached the officials. Arrested for a Triple Murder. WII.KKSP.ARKE, Pa., Dec. Trella, charged with the murder of Martin Curley, his wife and a Hunga- rian at liroderick's on Monday, was ar- rested yesterday at Jermyn. His coat and vest were covered with blood stains. He said that he was in tbe bar room when Curley and the dead Hungarian started to fight He jot scared and fled, thinking if he remained in the place j the populace would think he was the 1 murderer and would lynch him. From another source it is learned that Trella has made a full confession. Strark of mn SPRISOFIELD, IlL. Dec. The min- ers of tbe West End coal mines nave struck on account of an assessment of ten cents per capita by tbe management, Dannemora prison for seven years. His accomplices, Arthur Buett and Thomas L. Cain, entered pleas of guilty to the indictment Buett was given two years in Clinton prison and Cain three years and eight months. The three men broke down and sobbed aloud when sentence was pronounced.________ Probable F.t. of the Bill. WASHINGTON, Deo. 81. There has been much srieculatlon over tbe possible fate of the Elections bill in tbe House it it should pass the Senate. Leading Republican members who advocated tbe bill in tbe House say that tbe bill can not get through tbe House again and tbat if any amendments are made in the Senat! rendering a new considera- tion necessary in the House, tbe bill will not go to the President from this Congress. ______________ Anilltnnioiit nt lUroii Iiprelopl Sintfl of AfTUirn. AKBON, O.. Dec. The "Borke Co." assignment case has been decided in tho probato court The trial devel- oped a startling state of affairs. It was suspected that fraud had been commit- ted. Tho assets of tbe "firm" were found to consist mainly of empty boxes. When questioned in roeard to the busi- ness affairs of his concern Mr. Derke invariably answered, "I don't even to the simplest interrogations. A number of chattel mortgages had been filed against tho stock of tbe concern, and it was partly for tho purpose of test- ing them that tho suit >vas brought In rendering hisdecision Judge Grant sustained the Bonsationu.1 character of tho cade. Ho declared that there was no partnership existing among the par- ties, and tbat buii.oss was racnily car- ried on for tho purpose of deceiving the firms with whom thoy had boon trading. He said that there was no doubt in his mind that tho jftor the1 mort- gage bad b'-on givon, removed their goods under cover of tho night and shipped thorn to Now York to a sup- posed brother or brother-in-law, as it might be. Tho judge cited the faulty construction of the chattel mortgages and declared them void. CKUSIIKD BY A LOG. A Flndlay Man FatHlly Injured Willie Loading a Car. FINIU.AY, 0., Dec. Qor- rill, of this city, was fearfully and fa- tally injured Tuesday morning while loading loirs on a flat car at Dowling Station. Tho chain by which he was pulling the- logs on the oar broke and one of thorn rolled down. Gorrill started to run, but was caught by the log, which rolled over his entire body. His ribs, breast bone, collar bone and head were crushod, one eye boing forced out on his chook and both of his skull crushod in. Shot autl Killed Ilia Son. 0., Doc. Berry, a farmer who resides in the west- ern part of this county, Monday after- noon, while hunting rabbits, shot and instantly killed his ten-year-old son. The boy was sent forward with a ferret into a brush heap to scare up tho game, and his father, mistaking tho noise pro- duced by him for the movement of a rabbit, shot him. Architect AKRON, O., Dec. Snider, aged sixty-seven, died Tuesday morfc- ing- He was known all over the country as tbe pioneer in tbe latest Sunday- school architecture, fle was architect of tho Chautauqna Assembly buildings and of many churches and Sunday- schools in the East and South. sion of IK'iiry II. of as Associate of tho Supremo of tlm Tho Tliossa'.y. from New Or- eans for Hamburg, with cotton, has own aban i.mtul on !l -o in tho Xorth Sou. The wero r "v.Ml'Hl. At August i. I'.-i, tho other niirht, Foo- ter Shnrloi-k was probably fatally 
                            

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