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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 29, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 29, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 307. SALEM. OHIO. MONDAY DECEMBER 29. 1890. TWO CENTS. Horrible Tragedy Enacted in Minnesota Home. A Mother and Son Cat to Pieces -by an Infuriated Es- cape of Three GirK BLOCKED THE TRACK. Terrible Battle la the Culmi- In tbe UUcovery of the Murder- Corpie With a BuUet la His Brain. ST. PAUL, Minn., Dec. horrible tragedy occurred near the town of Car- lisle Saturday night. Carl Rehrei a German, sixty years of age, lived in Wilkin County, about twelve miles from this city. His family consisted of a wife, aged son Henry, twenty-five, and three daughters, aged twenty-two, sixteen and fourteen. A few weeks ago, a violent family broil, Rebrerquit tbe house and went to live in Elizabeth, a town eight miles distant Saturday he returned home about nine o'clock in the evening. After greeting his family he stepped into a room at tho back of the house and a moment later appeared at the door with a self-cockinop revolver in each hand, which he leveled and began firing. After wounding his son, eldest daTijrh- ter and wife the lamp was extinguished by one of the bullets. The entire fami- ly made a rush for the door, hoping to escape in the darkness. Rehrer dropped his revolver and drew a huge carving knife with which he fatally stabbed his son. The three daughters got safely out of the houso and hid themselves in the outbuildings. Rehrer then turned on his wife and stabbed and hacked her full of holes, any one of half a dozen of whioh would have been fataL When the neighbors attracted by tha noise arrived they found Rehrer dead with a bullet in his brain and a rope around his neck. He had thrown the rope over a beam and put the noose arounfl his neck and as the nooae tight- ened had blown out his brains. The eldest daughter will probably recover, though her wound is dangerous. Ex- cept the frequent quarrels in the fam- ily, there was no known cause for Reh- rec's action. The tragedy was one of the most horrible as well as inexplicable in the criminal annaU of Minnesota. UP. BlK Foot and Bund of 1QO Wart-Ion Surrender to a Cavalry Officer. OMAHA, Neb.. Dec. 29. At headquar- ters of the Department of the Platte last night a dispatch was received from General Brooke which stated that Major Whitesides, in command of a battalion of the Seventh cavalry, had captured Big Foot and bis entire band near the head of Porcupine creek. About 150 bucks surrendered. General Brooke also telegraphed that the hostilesin the Bad Lands had surrendered and would reach Pine Ridge on Tuesday. Bright Eyes sent word Saturday night to the World-Herald that ha-f the hostiles had left the Bad Lands and were within a few hours' march of the aeency. Charged With Attempt1 to CTN cnnrATi, Dec. 39. big tobacco warehouse firm, the Brooks-Waterfield Company, has bronghtsuitinthe Dnitec States court against George E. Water field, a merchant of Felicity, O., whom the firm charges with attempting to de- fraud them. It is alleged that on No- vember 7, knowing that he was insol- vent, he assigned all his real estate and personal property. The warehouse firm ask that a receiver be appointed to take charge of Waterfield's effects and also ask that a special master be named to hear evidence in the case. Fatal of a Bailer. Dec. A disastrous boiler explosion occurred Saturday on the premises of Gus Loewenstein, Jr., butcher and manufacturer of sausages, at Ninth and John streets. He uses for the purpose a four-horse power steam engine, the boiler of which is located in a small brick building in tbe rear of the shop. There was a terrific up- heaval in the vicinity and several build- ings, occupied as dwelling houses, wera wrecked. Bertha (tray, aged one and a half years, was killed and several per- sons badly injured. Starvation ia the Soodjtn. LoifDOJf, Dec. 29. The London Daily News' correspondent at Suakim tele- graphs that the full magnitude of the famine that for eighteen months has ravaged the Soudan can never be known. The extent of the affected region is very great In some places tbe poorer classes were forced to eat cats, dogs, and liz- ards, all vegetable food having disap- peared. There have also been many cases of cannibalism, freshly interred bodies of tbe dead having been er homed to satisfy tae cravings of banger. Tenement Block NEW BRITAIN. O-m.. TV-c. Tbe tenement and business block of Steele Damon was burned to the ground yesterday. Albert Mclntjre and bis wife from trie Jbird story o? tbe building r-a-1'v Tbe ttsaa scay OthT bad carrow The total loss is 000; insurance nod Dltpnte Between th rotber's boarding house at Stauffer. On Saturday Plunter called on his sweetheart. Shortly after Plutor came n. The two young men shook hands nd seemingly were the best of friends, n the course of conveisation Plutor in- ited Plunter upstairs. The latter ac- cepted the invitation and a short time thereafter the report of a pistol shot beard. The inmates of the house ran quickly to tbe scene, only to find the dead body of Plunter stretched on ;he floor with a bullet through his icarL Plutor was at once to ail, charged with murder. FOKCED TO SUSPEND. of the City National Baak of Neb., Decide to Cloie IU Doori. HASTINGS, Neb., Deo. a meet- ing of the stockholders of the City Na- tional Bank held Saturday night it was resolved to close its doors. The Comp- troller" of the Currency at Washington has been telegraphed to send a receiver. Balances owing to Eastern correspond- ents and the presentation of time de- posit certificates have reduced the funds below the legal limit and forced it to the wall. The bank holds a large amount of over-due paper upon which it has been unable to realize. Just how the liabilities and assets stand can not be learned, but it f.s admitted that the bank's aflairs are in extremely bad ihape. _______________ A WASDEIULNG EDITOR. Strange Story Told by a North Dakota Ifan Regardiug HU Mysteri- Disappearance. FABQO, N. D., Dec. two months ago H. H. Mattison. editor of the Fargo Daily Sun, disappeared and so trace could be found of him. Hatur- lay a letter was received from him by ais family dated Salem, Ore. He says tn the letter he remembers starting iown the street after supper on the aijfht following the November election, knows nothing further rejardinj his actions until he found himself in Salem in a half famished condition, le is at present employed on the Salem Statesman. During Mattison's absence bis daughter. Belle, has taken charge of lie Sun, the paper not having lost an issue. ft Dorm to TOKOXTO, Cnt, Dec. Pope, United States consul here, said in reference to a dispatch alleging that American consuls in Ontario have de- Iranded the United States out of a on dollars: "I think it's nothing more '.ban a mare's nest The accounts of jonsuls are inspected by the Treasury Department and I do not see how fraud jou'd go on without being discovered. There may be such a thing as petty lishonesly by some of the smaller igoticies, but I think that a million dol- .ars could be figured down to about UOO." No Telling as to the Amount il Circulation. K-cord Kept of tfie Notes Which the Government is Respon ible. foi A PENSIOH PROBLEM. The United Treasurer's Annual Re. port to tbe Quantity In Circulation to be Only GueMWork. NKW YORK, Deo. Washington special to the Daily News says that one can form an intelligent idea of the Yolurae of paper currency to-day in cir- culation. The Treasurer of the United States purports to give each year an ex- act and detailed statement ot the exist- ing condition of the finances, but the Treasurer has no exact data upon which to base his report and consequently it is defpc'ivo aid unreliable. There is not to be found in any bureau of the Treas- ury Department any record of the notes or certificates for which the Gorern- ment is responsible, and the Treasurer's t is consequently- nothing more than guesswork as to the volume of pa- per really afloat. He can not say of his own knowledge how many notes or sil- ver certificates of the several denomi- nations authorized by law are outstand- ing, sor can he give the precise aggre- gate amount. The way the Treasurer arrives at the amount of money afloat is by deducting the amount of currency destroyed from the acrerejrate amounts paid out by the Government This would appear to be correct, but it is fatally defeotlye be- cause he has no means of knowing that there are no duplicates of the notes de- stroyed either in the Treasury Depart- ment or In the hands of the people. It may be assumed that there are no dupli- cate notes afloat, but assumption can not be accepted as a basis for banking operations. The only way tbe Government has of knowing that there Is no duplication of notes is by obtaining: from the contrac- tors who furnish the paper a sworn statement of the number of sheets sup- plied the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and then deducting the num- ber destroyed in the press room and adding to this number tbe number of sheets ot printed notes rceaived at tbs Treasury Department These must balance with the total number of sheets furnished by the contractors. Were la tke Well aaCalM BaUtle4M Moaatjf A problem arisen under the new pension law last June. law grants pensions soldiers who served ninety days and BOW unable to earn a support, pro- they were honorably discharged. officials of the Pension Office Ot the opinion that the act of June ST. flBOt did not include soldiers who had bien in Confederate service, as the Mill. is silent in regard to this class ot pensioners, neither does it repeal Sec- tion 4710 or wind up with the usual sav- lajr acts and parts of acts lobonsistent with this act are hereby nfoealed." -The question was referred to Assist- ant Secretary Bussey, who decides that claimants who served in the Confederate anny prior to enlistment in the United States service under the act of June 27, ISftO, are placed on the same footing as all other Union soldiers. Some ot the bffloial minds of the Pension Bureau are bothered to know what to do with those that were wounded while in the Confed- erate service. The only restriction that the act of June 27, 1390, makes, is that the disabilities must not be the result ot the soldier's own vicious habits. But Little Wlh be Done This Week by Congress. A Crii! Expected In the Senate January 5 When the Rale Comes Up. OB FOUND ICY GKAVES. Terrible Aceldeat 1m Drowned IB the of the Klrer Avon LOSDON, Deo. terrible accident reported from Warwick-on-Avon. Saturday while thousand akaters were disporting- themselves on the river at that place the ice suddenly and with- out warning cracked in the middle of che river. An immense fissure opened, through which some 500 ot the skaters were plunged into the icy waters. A :ry of horror arose from the spectators, while the more fortunate of the skaters lost no time in reaching the river banks. When the first shock was over a num- ber of people hurried to the rescue of the drowning skaters and a number of them were pulled out The latest re- ports state that seventeen bodies have been recovered, among them several women. If the Have a Pres- ent They Will Bare Plata Sailing. Ota- erw'.ee a Loaf Stracsle U Inevlttble. WASHTSOTON, Deo. The holiday season has brought Congressional pro- ceedings to a standstill, and week is likely to be duller than last week. The Senate will meet to-day and if a quorum is present the Elections bill will be further discussed. It is not at all probable, however, that a quorum will be secured any day in the week and in this event no business will be trans- acted and adjournments will be taken from day to day. If a quorum should be secured at any tfrne the Elections bill will be discussed. The crisis in tbe Senate over the clo- ture rule is expected next week. On tbe 5th of January tho Republicans hope to have a full attend moo. with their ma- jority iicrervwl by the arrival of the two Senators from Idaho. Than will come tho of The Srst fight will the adoption of Senator AMricV" anionltnnnt ruins, giv- ing the majority power to close debute. If the Republicans h IVP a quorum pres- ent and they havo flvo more than a quorum on their sido of the it will b. comparat'voly plain nailing. If they have not, may be pro- longed until the ot the Dem- ocrats is exhausted or arbitrary ures are adopted bv tlio Republicans. In the House a three days' adjourn- ment will be taken from Tuesday 'until after New Year's and thon another ad Journmaat will be taken until week. BY TUB A. Drummer CH LO rt L HOUTE. a Drank FAILED Are Stupe oiled Between United Oomm Ailiners and the TAHLEQTTAH, I. T., Dec. 'Negoti- ations between the United States and the Cherolcees have proven fruitless, the two commissions disagreeing on the rights of the Cherokees to enter the United States courts and also as to the price per acre, the Cberokeas asking two dollars. The commission on the part of the Cherokee Nation made its report to the Cherokee Senate to the effect that the commission has asked that the negotiations be only suspended, and that a committee be appointed by the Cherokee Nation to meet them in Washington and continue negotiations at that place. The United States Com- mission will leave the Cherokee capital for Washington this week. atul f S. C. dosti jved the r works, Losd. LATEST SEWS Gathered by i-'roia Farts o( ur h. MO.VKAY. The sehoon -r Il.-nrv M. Sta il.-y, the first of the frozen herring fleet, has ai iriuiic-jb Mass.. With pouiuis of flsb. Eight of the jurymen who t-.-iv.-il Ey- raud, tho Parisian stran.rifr, nave signed a petition fora eommu...uon ot a is sentence. Fire the other Friato phosphate near Charleston, fully insured. The ail chess player, Wa'tor Qriinshatv, cuu.iuitted suicide at London, tho other d.iy, by cutting bis throat with a raior. The Howard LaUe (Minn.) roller will. Bonniwell Son proprietor-., caught fire recently and was burnc 1 to the ground. Total loss Largo numbers of Armenians are em- igrating to Groat Rritain wd Russia to escape the powvuiuon to which they nre snbjectrtl by the Turks and Kurds. Mr. 0 Uonnoll, of mont, has notified tho Xutiotril l> iguo bankers thn; tbp council of the League is alone ompowererl to dispose of tbe Paris fund. Ten hot'ioiHea, containing -1.0.10 trop- ical plants, and a tenomo'H hous-> ad- joining. :it K'noxvillo, 1'a.. totally destroyed by flre recently, buss 000; no insurance. At Lancaster, Pa., tho l-'I-hlng Crook [jumber Csmpany m-ilu an assign- ment. The has :i paid up capi- tal of Tho arc believed to excoed the liabtlltlos. Additional par lieu Urs from China as to the destruction of the steamer Shang- hai, near Nanking, show tho loss of life to have been greater at first sup- posed. Over 200 pprnon--- wo-e drowned. Dec. The  rs, and several of them were anything jut Anarchists. One of his hoarers was to nn-Anarchistic that he interrupted Most several times, abasinz bim and his jdeas roundly. Most's speech was as in- as anyone could make from bis of view. The speech was all in German and was occasionally applauded. Identified. Dec. high- wayman who a; tempted to rob a street Friday and and killed 5y driver has been identified as Mex Cronin. a crook. He has lervei term in the Kentucky peni- and :wo terms in this Stale for lighway rvhVrj. Scelej appeared ia Saturday and all cbarges against were dismissed, 23. The jory oT Eidalro  Stevens, owner of the Ssnborn County bank, which failed Fri- day, has driven him mad. Steps aw being taken to have him examined by the insanity board and sent to an asy- Inm. Jast before going crazy gave Instructions to the assignee to pay back some money to a few creditors who bad made late deposits, but, nobody know- ing the combination of tbe safe, it could not be opened. Small depositors lose about and they are greatly exdtad. _____________ Starving Miners for Aid. NEW YORK, Dec. Central Labor Federation yesterday reported that a communication had been received from the miners of Birmingham, Ala., stating that many of their number would be hungry before tbe year was out, and asking for assistance. The mat- ter was referred for farther considera- tion.______________ CoLfMJUA, Teen., Dec. broke out at an early hour Sunday morning on the public square aad destroyed five brick business blocks, five saloons, two frame grocery stores, a saddler sbop. barber shop and a number of tenement boases- Loss at 350.000; ia- alwjt half. Serrtttf t Jonctlwo. N- H-, Dec. of the peUtion of Harry Bingbam and other Democrats for an injaactioa to restrain Gerk froaj placJajr tbe of entitled" members appa the roil of tbe next Hoa-e. wltb a noUoe that a bearing be held the 9oprwne Conrt Thursday, being served apwa forty members thus elected.______________ of Unwwt' Coi-omrs. O., Dec. Wonn, aged years. aitted suicide Saturday by berstlf through body. viad wrecked by trai Thr R Dec. 'JU- At a lucxe mock- ing Sunday at whioh many olurjymon delivered addressos, resolutions wore .adopted expressing sympathy with the strikers. The pasiangac sarvlce con- tlnuen to improxo and mails are being handled with almost, the customary regularity, but the freight traffic is still demoralized, and there are no sigr.s of a settlement of the dispute. Welt-i.notru Lottery Alnn Dies. NKW OKf.EASS, Dec. Dr. M. A. Dauphin, for twenty years president of the Louisiana Lottery Company. cUe.l bore yesterday. He was a naklvo o? Alsaco-Lorriino and was years old. _ _ Kllleil CHTCAOO, Dec. Frank a saloon-koepor at Millerand Polk strents. was found dead behind his bar Saturday morning, shot through tho heart It is believed he was murdorod by thierta. THE MARKETS. Flour, 1'rovUlon. NEWYOKK, Dec "osy at 4 per oent. Exchange closed steady. Posted ratp-j 4ST3 434, actual rates for slxtj 'lay Mils ftrii3 433 (or demand, Government bonds steady Currt fis at 109; 4s, coupon, at 12JJJ-, I'is do nt CI.EVKI.ASD, Dee. Country at 14 Minnesota pattiDt at Minnesota spriDg at S4.40 A4.SO. No. 2 red at 9Sc, No. 3 rod at CT.C. No. 3 mixed at 59c, No. 3 yellow at OATS-NO. 1 mixed at 47c, No. a white at 5Ckj, No. 1 wblle at 51c. Fancy creamery 38o, dairy at New York at Ohio at Strictly at S7c. Bulk at 15 per traateL NEW YORK, Dec. Dull and heavy. City mill rjfras fit I01S 3 superOni ut 5a. tine No. J red winter cash, do Doci-mhor at do Jmnoary do February at tl.Qm No. 2 mix-'d at Me cash, do December at56Sc, do January We. No. 2 st 
                            

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