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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 24, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE foi; VOL. II, NO. 304. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 24. 1890. TWO CENTS. The Defeat Administered to nelTs Cattdidate. Kwth Kilkenny Gave Over jority for Sir John Pops Hennessy. f ol Caad Will That Opponent lrt> Vary Jabt- Dec. The election Monday to fill the seat in the House of made vacant by the death of Mr. Marum, member for North Kilkenny, resulted in the return of Sir John Pope Henaessy, the aati-Paraell- candidate. The vote stands M fol- lows: Sir John Pope Hennessy, Mr. Viaoent Soully Vincent Scully, the defeated candi- date, has filed 'a petition praying that a certificate of election be not granted to Sir John Pope Hennessy. Mr. Scully's petition is based upon the allegation that undue pressure was brought to bear by the priests upon the illiterate voters of the constituency. Especial complaint it made of the action of tbe clergy in connection with the canvass of Castle Comer, during which Mr. Parnell and bis-frlends are alleged to have been as- saulted by a mob led by priests. The opponents of Mr. Parnell are ex- ultant over the result, which theycon- the forerunner of a. sweeping Tiolory in the coming general election. The ParneUites are greatly cast down and practically concede the causa of their leader to be hopeless. NEW YORK, Dec. Messrs. John Dillon 'and Thomas P. O'Connor, the two remaining Irish envoys on this side of the Atlantic, have issued the following statement in reference to the Kilkenny r "We learn the result of the Kilkenny election with great pleasure. The ma- jority is greater than we had hoped for. It is a vindication of the patriotism and sagacity-of tho constituency, because it fihows'that consideration of the good of the countryand the safety of the cause hare prevailed with the electors over natural feelings of gratitude and affec- tion for a great loader like Mr. Parnell, which have blinded io many to tho true issue at stake. Tbo result in Kilkenny in bur judgment offers a change of re- uniting our party, and we earnestly hope that both sides will now co-operate with Mr. O'Brien in bringing about a re- union of the Irish National party." GROWING VKKY SEKIOUS. Strike In Scotland ITUtj Passing Hoar. EDINBURGH, Dsc. The great rail- road strike has extended to this city, and is constantly assuming more for- midable proportions. Freight traffic in this part of the country is entirely sus- pended, and it is believed that within a few hours the engine fires of all pas- senger trains will be banked. Some have already failed to make their usual trips, and others are being moved very irregularly, notwithstanding the asser- tions of the managers that they wore prepared for just such an emergency. The employes are orderly, but deter- mined and vigilant. The system of picketing which they put in operation here Tuesday gives evidence of the ex- istence of careful forethought and per- feot organization. Much apprehension is felt by manufacturers lest sympa- thetic strikes aad the compulsory shut- ting down of numerous establishments lor lack of fuel still further complicates the situation, already serious. Bobbed by Mmvked of S4.BOO. HA-NXIBA.L, Mo., Dec. Leland Mc- Elroy. a well-to-do farmer living near Bnider, Rolls County, opened tbe door Monday night in response to a knock, and as he did was confronted by two masked men armed with revolvers, who demanded that he hand over his money. Mr. McElroy gave taem his pocketbook containing 5104. Tho robbers then searched the house and found in fold and 83.500 in This seemed to satisfy them and they left. They are still at large. Harder Su-cide ''y a flejfcted FOKT WAT.NE, Ind.. Dec. Wesley Tnllis, a prominent young business man of Gorydon. a town forty miles south of here, who has for a Ion? time been pay- ing attentions to Miss Viroaa C. Travel, sailed on her Tuesday morning and uked her to marry him. She referred him to her mother. Toe latter objected to tbe match- and ordered TnllU out of the house, fie drew a revolver, shot Virena through the heart. Srei twice at her mother without taking effect and then blew oat hi> brains. Lottery Fight Icmm in Profrwn. BATO.V ROUGE, La.. Dec- The lot- tery Sgbt opened Tuesday before Jndge Bnckner with arcamonts for a writ of mandamus acainsz {Secretary of State to compel him to promulgate tbe act jossed by tbe Legislature at its last session granting a lov.ery charter to John A- Morris sad others for a term of twenty f." zn aaaaal payaeat 3f Whichever war tae de- cision goes it will apj.-eaicd to the Suaretce Coari, waicL la Febru- ary aext. Took With f CoL. Drc. Fraalc took a dose of Monday s.iichiii iaiea; aad is aot ex- pected to lire. He was foaad rooai yesterday morning by sbe clerk. is stoaec otter aad has no _ TO DC Dec. Judge yesterday ovarraled a aatioa for a aev trial i3 the case of Edward McCarthy, convicted of aitsrdcr in tbe first degrw for killing aad to U hanged April t, __ WILL NOT COMPKOMISB. of Force FlKbtlac the WASHIXGTON, Deo. is expected that the action of the Senate Finance Committee in substituting the provision for two percent bonds to take the place of the fourth section of the caucus financial bill, which provides for the purchase of silver to replace bank notes retired, will consoliuate the silver forces, and it is liable to result in the adoption of a free coinage bill. For past two days the silver Republicans have been divided, some mistrusting and some bavins confidence in their Eastern anti-silver associates. Senator Stewart says that the bill as amended is designed marely to rehabili- tate tbe National banks and that the silver men had no interest in it The purchase of the surplus silver held by a pool was not a matter the advocates of free coinage were interested in. All the Republican silver men are in an inde- pendent frame of mind and the indica- tions are that there will be a combina- tion between them and the Democrats who agree with them. The matter again seems to be at a crisis. The conciliatory disposition on both sides is no longer apparent The silver men have decided ta effect a com- bination and expect to agree upon a free coinage bill with which they will displace the Elections bill nex1; week. Tho issue seems to have been made by the necessity for the leaders to either yield or else follow their own inclina- tions and let the fight come. On both sides of the financial question the time for temporizing is regarded as about at an end. SWITCHMEN'S TKOUBLE9. Will be Settled by Managerg Without Delay. CHICAGO, Dec. 24. The difficulties be- tween the switchmen and the Western railroads will probably be settled one way or another to-day. The managers of the Chicago, Milwaukee St Paul, Chicago Northwestern, Chicago, Rock Island Pacific and the Illinois Central held a conference with a committee ot the dissatisfied switchmen yesterday, A compromise proposition submitted by the managers was discussed at great length, but without reaching a decision tho conference adjourned. After the conference had adjourned the railway managers informed the men that the companies would no longer treat with the committee collectively, but that each company would adjust matters separately with its own employes. BAKBAKOUS BUK14.L KITES. Relative! of Executed Indulge fa Heathenish Oreli-i. HKT.CXA, Mont, Dec. The bodies of tbe four Indians who were hanged at Missoula on Friday last have been buried at St. Ignatius Mission. The families and relatives of the dead men gathered in the night and began a weird ceremony after the style of the old In- dian funeral rites. The crowd was dis- persed by the Indian police. The wives of Laze and Pascale, two of the executed men, gashed their own heads and were preparing to cut off the fin- gers of one band when they were stopped. The children of the dead In- dians also gashed their beads and bands ftnd thnir blood was dripping into graves which had been partially opened. CONGUES8IONAL. The House TTntll Friday Senate WASHINGTON, Dec. The House yesterday after listening to the reading of ths journal and approving it, and hearing the Speaker's announcement of assignment of sev- eral members to committees, adjourned until Friday. la ihe Senate Mr. Morgan during the hour spoke m support of his reso- lution directing the Conmittue oa Privileges and'Elet-nous U- amend the Elections bill so as wh it changes and modifications In exist- ing law are in ten !o ua Tbe E bill was then taken 9) Senators Call and McPbcrso spoic in uppos.tion 'o the bill Mr. Aldricb r'oiure resolution later In tne artorr.oun the request thjt It lie on the tjble and be p-uifd. VHM Cattli-ranii Kidil e 1 With SAX AXTOXIO. Tex., Dec. F. M. Wilkins, a partner in the large cattle ranch of Wilkins Bros. Co., together with a cowboy named C. S. Walton, were found Monday shot to death at their camp, fifty miles from Lanpley. Wilkins' body had been ridlled with bullets and thrown into an old store- house. while Walton bad evidently been shot while eating breakfast. Two Mexi- cans are suspectod of tbe murders and bave fle.i across tbe Rio Graodo, with the s Lie riff and poiso in pursuit. by a Dream. CHAiiixrrTE. X C, Dec. Seven weets ayo the wife of Ed Wallace, a colored man of Wadesboro. was missed. Her husband said she had left him and be left Waiesboro to hunt her. The other day a nesrro wo-naa said that she dreamed that tbe missine w.-.man was in tbe well of the she bad lived. Investigation veriSed tbe dream and tho body recav-dr'-i in a badly iecompofd   tbe coort aliowel so esiension. Tae crediiors lec'.ed to interests in reference to tbe disposal of beid bjr grg. With a Banquet by the New Yortt Tariff .eibrin Club. Large Assemblage of Prominent Dem- ocrats to Commemorate Kccpnt Successes at the PolR Ex-Preaideat Cleveland U an Oration and With a Silver Cop for President Jeffer- NEW YOKK. Dec. Tariff Re- form Club held a banquet last night at Madison Square Garden to celebrate the recent Democratic victories, which the club views as a vindication of its princi- ples. Covers were laid for 500 persons and the galleries were well filled with an audience of which the ladies formed a prominent part The decorations were very elaborate and beautiful. Among those seated at the tables were ex-Pres- ident Cleveland, Senator Carlisle, Ever- ett P. Wheeler, who presided; Governor Horace Boies, of Iowa; Governor-elect Russell, of Massachusetts: Hon. Carl Schurz, W. U. Hensel, of Pennsylvania; Tom L. Johnson, of Ohio; Henry Vil- lard, Dan S. Lamont, Senator-elect Brice. L. Trenholmand ex-Governor Hoadly. Shortly after nine o'clock E. P. Wheeler began his opening address, re- ferring to the motive of tne meeting. Whenever the name of Grover Cleve- land was mentioned, tumultuous ap- plause followed that seemed to have no' end. Cries of "Cleveland! interrupted the speaker and when the ex-President, -was finally introduced there was an ovation. Mr. Cleveland re- plied to the toast "The Campaign of Education." When Mr. Cleveland finished speak-- ing, a massiyq silver cup was. presented to him by president Wheeler. The cup had on one side a representation of Jef- ferson's mill and on the other of his residence, said to be one of a set of thirteen made for presentation to Jef- ferson on behalf of his admirers in the thirteen original States. It was un- earthed in Virginia a few years since and came into the bands of Jesse Met- calf, of Providence, who banded it to the committee to present to Mr. Cleve- land. After the applause had subsided Hon. John G. Carlisle, of Kentucky, spoke on "Popular Government." BUKlbD IN Tttri iiUINS. Building In Connie of Erection DOWD, Ktllluff Man and Injuring Many Others, Two FAtuilf. AKRON, Or Dec. 24.- A terrific wind blew yesterday in this vicinity, tearing down signs and chimneys. At Barber- ton, an Akron suburb, the Creedmoor cartridge works, now building, which had reached three stories in height, was blown down, burying many work- men in the ruins. Twelve carpenters were placing joists over the third story when a heavy gust of wind came. There was a crash, a swaying of walls and the building and all fell with a crash, the men dropping fifty feet' John Triplet, a workman, was horri- bly crushed and killed outright. Theo- dore Homer, the contractor, was so badly hurt that be can not live and Frank Mallory was injured internally so that there is no hope of his recovery. The others injured are: I. 8. Cower, Louis Fanella, Joe Carey and Hol- lo welL These, though suffering se- vere fractures, will probably live. Tha walls, it is said, were weakened by frost. Tee loss will be many thousands of dol- lars. _ Kicked AotagouUt to Death. DANVILLE, Va., Dec. 24. James Gra-. vett and Edward Enoch had a quarrel in a saloon here yesterday, when Enoch knocked Gravett down and literally stamped the life out of him. Gravett's fac ewas fearfully crushed and he died in a few moments. Both men had been drinking- before the quarrel began. The saloon-keeper, the only person who wit- nessed the tragedy, did not know that the men were mad until he saw Enoch knock Gravett down. Enoch was ar- rested and seemed much surprised when he learned that bis victim was dead. Not In Love With Stanley. 24. divy of Prof. Jamieson, who was attached to the rear guard of the Stanley expedition, will be published to-day. In a preface to the work, Jmmieson's wife and brother bitterly upbraid Stanley for making a scapegoat of Jamieson and others for his own errors of judgment and neglect of proper precautions. They intimate that both Stanley and Bonney are guilty of deliberate falsehood in regard to the cannibal episode. Oj-nrmniHer .n.xne by Cruelty. LoifTwr. Dec. 24. McCabe. who was convicted in 1 833 of bio wing np the Glas- gow gas works with dynamite, has just died in prison at Perth. He has been insane for the past two years. Bis friends allege that be was driven crazv by creel treatment. and DOS. Dec. The Hamburg ship Lious-oa collided -with tbe British ship Taiookolar. from Calcutta for London. yesterday snomiag. The captain and twenty-two of ibe crew and ten passen- gers of the Talookolar lost. WHfe SALAMANCA, jf. Y., Dec. workman were raising np a heavy Iron tree at tbe roundhouse here vesterday it overbalanced and fell, carryinir the scaffolding with it Four men were hurt. BBAZO, Ind.. Dec sx.-Tbe boiler it the Central Iron and Steel Covpair's eroded yesterday. Archie Tate. Joe Howard wn, Passenger Train Wrecked Spreading Kails. People oft Board Mora or Less Injured Two Coaches Thrown Over a Trestle. A Bad Accident on the Hew Torts A PookiylTanla Road at Pa. BRAWono, Pa., Deo. A passenger train on the Western New Penn- sylvania railroad jumped the track yes- terday at Watsonville, sixteen miles north of this city, and twenty-one of "the thirty-eight passengers on board were more or leu injured. The wreolc was caused by spreading- of the rails, two passenger cars and a baggage car top- pling over an eight-foot trestle. Follow- ing is a list of the injured: Mrs. James Blake, of Sheffield, Pa., out on forehead, nose crushed and upper teeth broken off. besides other injuries; Conductor Ed Johns, right arm broken and shoulder hurt; Mrs. F. G. Boyer, bad scalp wound; Road master Daniel Shine, of Olean, N. Y., severe cut on the face and neck; C. A. Doener, Couders- port, Pa., nose broken and internal in- juries; Miss Gertrude Blake. Sheffield, Pa., injured about the shoulder; R N. Criswell, of Bradford, badly bruised about the head and body; John Bell, of Portage Creek, Pa., left arm sprained; Mrs. Curry, of Bradford, left hand sprained; Samuel Bowman, of Portage Creek, right hip and leg hurt; Maud Uervey, Bradford, bad bruises; Mrs. R. N. High, scalp wounds; W. W. Sterling, Spartansburg, Pa., right leg sprained; Edward Smith, Eldred. eye bruised; JNews Agent Lacey, .Bradford, severe bruises; J. S. Kennedy, of New York, bruises and sprains; J. M. Lyon, West Salamanca, N. Y.. seve're cut over the left eye; D. J. Gibson, Venango, Pa., left shoulder badly sprained; A. C. Robinson, of the Boston Ideal Club, in- jured internally; L. H. Galencia, same club, wrist sprained; J. EL Reynolds, Boston, ankle sprained and severe bruises. A relief train was sent from here and prompt medical aid the sufferers. FOK JUSTICE. ilnnrr B. Brown, Michigan, Ohooea to Succeed tbe Lute Samuel P. Miller In United -tupreme Court. WASUINOTOX, Dec. 24. The President yesterday sent to the Sonate the nomi- nation of Henry R Brown, of Michigan, to be As octate Justice of the Supreme Court of the JJai ted States, vice Samuel F. Miller, deceased. DETROIT, Mich., Dec. 24. Judge Hen- ry B. Brown was born at Lee, -Mass., March 2, He graduated from Yale University in 1856, having for his class- mates Chauncey M. Depew, Judge David J. Brewer and others who have since obtained national reputation. At the close of his college course he spent a year in Europe, studying languages and traveling. On his return he began his law studies at Hartford, Conn., ard re- ceived his degrees ''rom the Hartford law department In 1859 he came to Detroit. In April. 1881, he was ap- pointed Deputy United States Marshal and Assistant District Attorney. His connection with th'e latter office contin- ued until' 1868, when he- was appointed judge of the -Wayne County Circuit Court to fill a vacancy. In March. 1875, he was appointed by President Grant judge for the Eastern division of Mich- igan. Politically Judge Brown has al- ways been a Republican. Market Building DETROIT, Dec. During the prevalence of a severe gale yesterday the eastern market building on Russel 1 street blew down, severely injuring three persons, slightly injuring several others, killing three horses and injuring four more. The building was simply an enormous roof, supported by Iron pillars with a ground plan in the form of a cross extending in' each direction from street to street through the center of the square. Fire In m MUiourl ALEXANDRIA. Mo., Dec. 24. Fire Monday night destroyed a block of bnildings in the central portion of this village. The fire originated in the ware- house of tbe St Louis, St Paul Min- neapolis Packing Company, and at one time it was feared the whole town wonld be destroyed. Tbe Keokuk fire depart- ment was summoned, but when they ar- rived the fire was under control. The loss is estimated at insurance smalL _ Murder, ftobberjr and Anon. FnfDLAY, O-, Dec. John Brennan, a son of Captain J. C. Brennan, of this city, was murdered at Bay's Station, on Toledo. Findlay  0 by his father's na.-'ip Tlie thrfe National banks of that plar" Crews has disappeared: The Lake Shoro railroad directors have declared a aomi-annual dividend of two and a half per cent and an extra dividend of one-half per Hereafter the regular dividends will be flvS per cent, por annum. The GoverniriHnt tins been successful in recovering acres of land from the Sioux City St. Paul railroad, claimed by that corporation as part of its land grant The land, which is val- uable, is located in Iowa and the decis- ion was rendered by the Circuit Court of Iowa. While Dr. A. V. Brokaway, a promi- nent physician of St. LouU, was out driving the other day his horso bocam'o unmanageable aad ran away. Dr. away wa3cthrown from tho carriage, his skull fractured and he received interntd injuries. It is thought he can noY re- cover. The latest Parisian novelty is a small model of tho trunk which Qgufeil in the GoulTe murder as the roc'Dptaclo of the victim's mutilated body. It is a puzzle to tho trunk, and whin the experimenter has ovnreotffj tho ditll- culty the lid flies open and he is re- warded by the sight ot a leaden imago of the un fortunate police notary. There is a revulsion of fet-i ing in Paris In favor of Eyraud, tbe stranglor of Gouffe. It is generally that bia companion, Gabriello Itompavd, was tho greater criminal of tho two and tho fact that sho was lot off with a tonu of im- prisonment, while Eyraud was doomed to the guillotine, has aroused a feolin of protest against the apparent injustice of the verdict. Mr. Blanchard, of Louisiana, has in- troduced in tho a resolution in btructing tho Committee on Banking aJid Currency to bring in a bill provid ing for such an increase of tho legal tender currency of the country as, united with tho present supply of money in circulation and that being coined under existing laws, will in- crease the volume of money to S50 per capita of population. TlE MARKETS. Flour. Grain 1'rovUion. NEW YOKK, Dec. M MoNKV-Closecl easy at 3 per cent the lowest rate highest 5. Exchange closed steady. Post id rates 480V4 actual rules 47'j'4 for sixty day Uilln and for demand. Government bonds closod steady. CurreacySs mt ;09; 4s, coupon, at 12i; -IMS do at CLEVELAND. Dec. Country made at Ji Minnesota patent at Minnesota spring at t4.40a4.80. 1 red at No 3 red at 9Sc. No 2 mixed 1 No 3 yellow at 5So. No. 2 mtieJ at I7c. No. 2 white at 5tc, No. 1 white at .Me. Fancy crbamcry at dairy at 23c. New York at lUc. Ohio at Strictly fresh at 27c. Bulk tl.15 per bnsheL New YonK. Dec. Qniet and bearr. Fine at superfine at 3. TS.'eUy mill extras at V- ing.VA Minnesota extra J3.40a5.00. Dull No. 2 red winter at do December at do January at COBS -No 'i mixed at BQc cash, do D.-ccmbOT at January at OATS-NO, a mixed at cash, J.'.nuary at 48 c. poRK-Mess ntti2.ooaia.ia January U5. February 16.19. Western creamery fancy it 29c CHEESE at tv Western fresh At CHICAGO. Dec. 23.- December at 83c. Cons -Dec -rober at 4Sc, Junoary at at 40c. January at 40'4c. at ffl at S5.72K. at I4.9IH. Sales o! TOLEDO. Dec. Qalet. cash at COBJt-Flrro Sales of cash at S2c. Quiet. Sales of cash at 46c. Lire-Stock. CHICAGO. M Firm Snipping at KKO-JS fttockeni fe'-dtrs at in 1 common ttocx at IL9) at y. Hght Barely steady. Inferior to at O. Dec. Steady. SBCKF AXD Dull on coTcoioo stock. Mediates, bcary aad at EAST LIBERTY. Dec. Market Xarfcet acUve. PUJadcIphUs at felt nixed at CU093.M. M light Yorkers at Sncvp-Market don M ycs'-ertJay's prli ClXcnniA'n, Dec. IS Connnol at fair to good llgat at i3 do packing at 50. Delect Xntchers at 160. Keceipts shipattBts From tho Broad Fields ot Ohio. A SPUIXGFIKLD MYSTEKY. A Hoarding on Fire Tlunx in Twenty.four O, Dec. MeGowoa's boar-hnp houso hero, which has caught flro sixty Unit's in the last sir weeks, is now "juardeil by police. All to discover tho origin of the flames liavt' provoi fruitloss. In twen- ty-four hours Uvonty-fivo fires have started and y. nuiub-.-r of tmios tho house has narrowly escaped burning' to the ground. Tho Hros started mainly in clothing. Tlie yard is filled with huraed clothing. Mrs. Mi-Oowon is afraid to live in the houso. Minnie Mickley, a servant girl accused of tlio tiling, is constantly still the flras break out. through the a-reucy of a chemical oorupound. 'I'uo ho-1-.u is the suhjrot of g-rt'.-it un.t boen visited by hundreds. insurance ag-oiits. have cuncfl'.od the policy on the Thore were seven fires in thq house Mon i.iy. A TKST OASiC. Sfi-k-  up to agreement __ SimHi.T Won. .CI.'KVELAXH. Dec. The' proat an- nual main of tramn --ooks of Ohio was foujfhton Monday nliht and Tuesday morninp, near DiOawir'i, 0. botween chickens from CU'vi-huiJuoops aud birds from Dulavviire un I ChtUieothe. It was intended to have twentv-ono fights for PSO a each on tho main, but only seventeen pairs of birds wore se- lected. TLo Cleveland cocks won eight tho southerners nine und tbe main. About ohanjrod hands on ,the _______ Nurroirly l-Nrnpoil CA.XTON, Dec. 24. The residence oo- cupiod by attorney Samuel Burgett and family in tho we-jtorn part of tho city wasjkotally destroyed by at, two o'clock Tuesday morninf. Tho loss is about insured for St.sod.- Mr. Hurgettand other members of his fami- ly had a narrow escape with their lives, being compelled to jump from tho upper windows. One of tho young ladies lumped into a man's arms below and was badly injured. State Board of Pnnli'nt' Coi.r.MBua, Doc. Tho State Uoard of Pardons have filed their annual re- port with the Governor. In the last rear the boarJ has recommended twen- ty-six convicts for pardon and five for commutation. Since the board was or- ranlzed, April 12. pardons have been recommended by tho board in ly-nino cases. AMI NOB WALK. O., Doc. 24. Lysandor Paine, of Plymouth, who pleaded ifuilty week to aiding in tbe abandonment if the child Mary Hills and wan mixed jp In tho [fills-Sawyor blackmail ichomo. has made an assignment. As- icts estimated at 000: li abilities ITnntH WtO.tlOO for fining x Thl-t IKONTON, Dec. 34. Postmaster S. It. Steece, a wealthy dry goods morcJjant >f tbls city, is sued Cor damages A suit for calling Miss Anna Hall, a .'ormer etnployo in bis store, a thief. There is already a suit pcndiag between the simp parties. Strtirlc br H Trwln. Dec. Moses Farmer, I coal mlnT, struck a freight train on tho Ft. road at North Lawrence Sunday night and his skull' fractured in si.-voral places. It is not probable that recover. TLie man a as a family. Death Dr. IJ'ark. WOO-'TFTI. O., Dec. 24.-Rov. Dr. Black. of r.n Woo9- University, dici Tuesday rr.oTunif. e was si e voars of I >r. a classmate of Secretary Biaine at Washington and Jefferson College, Fenn- iylvania. __ _ R ch by ttarftmn. AKKOX. O.. The ind store of G'-orjje Sha'w. tt was robbed Monday aijrhl by Blowers. Xcarlj SfX) in and stamps and a 
                            

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