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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 23, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM NEWS, VOL. IL NO. 303. SALEM. OHIO. TUESDAY. DECEMBER 23. 1890. TWO CENTS. An Important Decision in a sion Case. Sew Jersey Congressman Want! the Killing of Sitting Ball Investigated. Cffortf to Destroy Government Property In Navy of Com- jrreiii. WASHINGTON. Decs. retary Bussey has rendered a decision holding that the dropping of the names of George J. Bond and James Engle, who were dropped from the pension rolls because they were indebted to the United States on account of improper payment of arrearages in June, 1889, was an error. The pensioners were em- ployes In the Pension Office and their pensions were rerated with back pay to per month by Commissioner Tanner, under his interpretation of the law that for amputation of an arm at tho shoulder joint a pensioner was entitled to the same rate as if the amputation was at the hip joint In March. 1890, Commis- sioner Tanner's ruling was revoked, leaving the pensioners in debt to tha Government. Assistant Secretary Bus- sey, in a letter to Commissioner Raura, holds that the action of his bureau in suspending the names from the pension rolls was an error and directed that they be immediately restored to the rolls, re ceiving their pensions from the date of the revocation of the order. Mr. McAdoo, of Sew Jersey, dnced in the House yostorday a resolu- tion directing tho Secretaries of War arid Interior to send to the House all th'e official statements and correspond- ence in their possession relating to killing of Sitting Bull, especially the reports of the officers and agents direct- Ij'concerned in ordering or effecting his arrest, together with all other papers or facts known to them in connection with the matter. A preamble to the resolu- tion says that it is being charged in the public press and elsewhere, to the in- volving of tho national honor, that cer- tain Indian reservation police, acting under the military powers of the United States, milled the lace Sitting Hull and afterwards barbarously mutilated his remains. The recent efforts to destroy Govern- ment property in the New York navy yard are not the first attempts of this sort There are many instances to be heard of at the Navy Department. The United States steamer Ironclad was burned at tho dock in the League Island yard in 1S72; it is alleged by discon- tented workmen. The Delaware was sunk in her slip at Philadelphia. This was thought to have been dono by per- sons who wished to buy her. Then came attempts to sink tho Galena. Terror anc Miantonomah. Those troubles usually arise, it is claimed, from the appoint ment of political workers to places in the navy yards. It is probable that a concurrent reso- lution will be passed in the House to day providing for a recess of the House until the holidays end. The consent o: the Senate will be necessary before this resolution can become effective. The Consent will probably be given, but the Senate will not adjourn. Should the resolution fail the House will take sue eossive recesses for three days at a time during the holidays. A large number of members of tho House have been in- formed that the resolution will be called up and it is said there has been no ob- jection made to it. ________ TRAFFIC PARALYZED. Scotch Tied Cp Because of Strike of GLASGOW, Dec. long expected Itrike of the railway employes of Scot- Land was inaugurated yesterday. Al- ready the traffic of this district is al- most completely paralyzed. The few fains which the companies were able k> get out Monday were manned by de- pleted crews, made up in part of new nen and run at irregular intervals. Pickets were promptly placed by the nnion and they are endeavoring to in- duce the few engineers who remain faithful to their employers to desert the service. In Lanarkshire the strikers display remarkable activity, the engine houses, workshops and other company being surrounded by a swarm of ets. All mineral trains have abandoned the attempts to make thoir customary trips and passenger traffic has almost ceased. At a meeting of tho railway strikers last evening it was announced that men would quit work to-day The move- ment includes the employes of the Cale- donian, North British and Southwestern companies. The railways have given the men one day's notice to return to work, this being proper form of de- manding a fulfillmentof their con tracts. he companies claim that the men struck without giving legal notice and are thus liable to prosecution for breach of contract. The worst sufferer of all is the North British Company. All its trains between Aberdeen and Edinburgh have been abandoned, including the London express. The demoralization of the railway service is affecting the collieries and furnaces and all manufacturing busi- nesses. It is feared many establish- ments wtll have to suspend operations unless the strike can be settled soon. Iron "Workers Horribly Burned at Trenton, N. J. Water Thrown Upon a Mass of Molten Metal Results in an Explosion. Can ?fot Testify Her Ifasband. WAPHISOTOX, Dec. 23. In the Su- preme Court yesterday Justice Brewer announced the opinion of the court in the case of W. E. Bassett against the United Stat s, in which the court held that a wife's testimony against her hus- band while he is under trial for polyg- amy is incompetent. Bassett was con- victed on a charge of polyeamy in L'tah, in 1S86, the principal witness against him being his wife. The Supreme Court of the Territory affirmed the verdict and the case was brought to the Federal Su- preme Court on an appeal. Bloody Tamil? Row. MT. VEUJfoy. Ky.. Dec. At Brush Creek, nine miles east of this place, on Friday evening, five persons were wounded in a general row. Jack Baker received a ball in the left breast: Andy Mason had bis wrist shattered by a ball: a son of Mason g--t a furrow plowed across his head just over the left ear; John Anglin received a similar wound and Andy's wire was shot in the back. How the fight came up no one here bas yet been able to learn. All the partici- pants are related by carriage to each other. _ Another Victim of the Wreck. QtJEBF.r. Dec. Bcaaclca died Sunday, maidn? th" t-ichlb victim of recent railway Mes- daoies Gammon. a-ii fote are still ia a cnis-al ani scrcae fears are entertain'" recovery. Dioane.-tbe is ia a dangerous coaiiuon. The oVier Surviving i.-a-v-r areira- Cmn bw nf XETT ST. -Tt- teadeatof P .'.yc'snic Hospital states tiat oa itri af-jer Mop- day all persoas who applied woo were -a-oild inoculated with K-> fa's l-aopb oJ charge. tioas for sir'7 lymph paints. rowr Y.. Dec- 2S. -Jobs Hoi- oraa, who ;ail for 5 tioTj. and F. witeaced for thn same offense, were fonnd in their yesterday warning1- Aleo- holism is supposed to fce the dorsed Mr. Parncll as Believed That the Parnellltet Have Been Defeated. Active Work of the Priests Had Tell- ing Effect Upon the Electors. NEGRO DISFRAXCU1SEMENT Startling Proposition About to be by Southern Would Re- peal the Fifteenth Amendment. vVASFtTXGTON, Dec. Post to- day publishes the views of a number of Southern Congressmen on a proposition which, it says. Senator Butler will bring forward in the Senate before tbe debate on the Elections bill closes, for a joint eesolution depriving the negro of his right to vote, and at the same time re- ducing relatively Southern representa- tion in Congress. Senator Butler is re- ported as saying that he will dare Re- publican Senators to vote for such a measure, which he declares would re- ceive his hearty support. Senator Pugh declares emphatically that the South would not hesitate one moment to up any representation based on the negnu vote if by so doing it could forever eliminate the negro as a political entity. This the Senator thinks is the universal sentiment of the Southern people and this he thinks could be done toy repealing- the Fif- teenth Amendment to the Constitution and relegating the powers back to the States again, as it was before tho adop- tion of that amendment. Representative Mills, of Texas, says that the question does not concern him personally, as there are only ne- groes in his says that the Republican party will never consent to disfranchise the negro, even though tbo Southern representation was de- creased thereby. If the colored vote was eliminatfd, New York, Pennsylva- nia, Ohio. Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and other States would be Democratic, for the simple reason tbat the Republican majority in those States is less than the colored vote. Michigan, Connecticut and Massachusetts would also bo doubt- ful Republican States. Alii to- Destitute K-Mivnns. Kin., Dec. -J3 of ;he counties -f the northwestern part of the State have authorized bounties on wolf, rabbit and gopher sralps in or- der that destitute peowle may have a means of making a livelihood this win- ter. In County treasurer paid out ?1.700 in one day ami ovor 300 in six weeks, and tho drain became so heavy the county board suspended the order. Tbe same counties are get- ting ready to vote aid bonds to buy seed :orn. wbeat and potatoes for impover- ished settlers. Chlcngo Tndome Parnell. Dec. 2X. Five thousand Irish-American citizens assembled in IJattery D last night and heartily in- of Irish National party. were -'.'iliv- by Lar.-rfnce Hirmon John G. Fitzgibbons and John F. FinTty. and resolutions were adopted setting forth tbat "Parneii. more than any living statesman, rep-'-sr-nt'-I t'r.f of the Irish raco on of Irish Na- tional ST. 23. si T- lay go-aS- fo-u-please. with fifteen starters began bere this o'clock iZ'- t-j tnik-.. The starters or paaa. TX Pv VKZ -T. P.. four are frura St ITA tnth a 29 The Thrown to Ground, BeluR CoTored With the Terrlliln mud Asronlzinu Wounds. TBEXTOS, N. J., Dec. two o'clock Monday afternoon an explosion occurred at the New Jersey steel and iron works, fatally injuring five men. A large mass of molten metal, known as a had been taken from one of the furnaces to undergo the process of cooling. This is done by dashing buckets of water upon it after it has been exposed to the air long enough to somewhat abate the white heat at which it emerges from tho furnaces. The man in charge of the furnace de- termines the proper time to apply the water and the men in readiness with the buckets are required to follow his orders. Yesterday one of the helpers, Michael Fuda, without waiting for the signal threw his bucket of water upon the "cinder" almost as soon as it was taken from the furnace. As the water struck the huge mass the intensely heated metal exploded with a deafenine report, 1 urling in all directions large pieces of iron, some of them weighing hundreds of pounds. Fuda and his-foitp companions who were standing around the "cinder" were throwntothe ground, covered with horrible wounds, their clothing and flesh burning and emitting a sickening odor. Fuda, who stood a few feet nearer to the cinder than the others, had his eyes burned'completely out In the back of his neck was burned "a large hole' and several holes were burned ,in his body. Jacob Kress had his clothing almost en- tirely burned off and was terribly burned and mangled about the body and limbs. George Sintall had the flesh burned off many parts of his body, exposing the bones. Michael Soperip had a horrible gash cut in his abdomen by A flying piece of hot iron and his burns are so severe that the physicians have no hopes of his recovery. Michael Gosul- sas' burns were so numerous and seri- ous as to render him almost beyond recognition. The injured men wore re- moved to the hospital. Late last evening- they were all in a critical condition and the chances of re- covery of any of them are small. The rail mill, tho scene of the explosion, presented a horrible sight Great ch u nks of flesh dropped from the bones of the mangled and roasted men, filling tho air with a stifling odor, while the sur- roundings bore hundreds of traces of the force of the flying pieces of metal. The escape of the five men from in- stant death and of others in the mill from injury is miraculous. The ias: as a street rar. i" trv-V ar.i Ward, who -r.z'-T   flope VanUhox. NKW YOKK. Dec. The States Court bas decided to deny the motion to suspend judgment and for a new trial in the case of General Peter J. Claasen. president of the Sixth Na- tional Bank, which be tried to wreck. tbe court was unanimous, there can be no appeal to the United States Su- Court. Tbe extreme penalty U years and fine. Consolidation an Fart. Dec. Pittsburgh National Leajrce clnb was organized Monday bj ihe election of J. Palmer O'Neil as president; H. B. Roa. vice president: Lew Borwia, treasurer, and A. K. S-'andrett. secretary. A manager li b" cnos'-n aext Tuesday, and as all are a unit for Ed Ilaalon, the honor will be conferred apon him, Trmlo Wrorkera Arrrfttort. BEATWHE. Neb.. Dec. bare jast returned from Holmesville witb ibe Lily brothers, cbanred wilh wrecking the Union Pacific train there Soaday. oositive proof of the jfailt of these three. Bridge In- spector Mercer, who was scalded ia tha wreck, died last FORT XVATSE, Ind., Dec. The End street car subles were bnmed last aight Sixty, head of horses per- ished in tbe flames. This with harness and a large atr.oaat of hay will briajr tbe loss ap to about insurance not known. DEKA1LKD AT A SWITCH. Train on the Delaware Jt Hud- Don i'.nntt Itn Some Bad Work. AI.HANY, N. Y., Doc. 23. A narrow escape from a serious wreck and attend- ant loss of life occurred on the Dela- ware Hudson road between twelve and one o'clock Monday morning. As the Montreal sleeper passed Balls ton it dashed into a freight standing on a switch, knocking several cars off tho track and smashing two of the sleepers. Ko one was injured. It now transpires that a deliberate at- tempt was made to wreck the train, the switch bavin? improperly set and the switch 1) extinguished. As a consequence tiio train dashed into a siding filled with freight cars. Tho company is searching for the wreckers. There Will be No Strike. Doc. The grievance committee of employes of the B. O. railroad had an interview Monday with General Manager Odell. The conference was hold in private and what was said or done was not made public. Mr. Odell said he would not be at liberty to make any statement until after the com- mittee of B. O. officials moots to-day and considers tbe plans of the griev- ance comTiittee. Mr. Odell stated em- phaticahy, however, that the trouble would be amicably settled and that there wonld be no strike. Sheriff Fatally Asiaaltad by a MARTINS Ind.. Dec. 23. John Welch, a yonng attorney living near here, was returned from tho insane My 1 urn as cured, two months ago. Sat- nrday he began to show signs of return- ing insanity and Sunday afternoon offi- cers went to bring him to this city. Welch resisted and struck Sheriff Baker the head with a stone, fatally injur- ing him. Other members of the posse were also injured. During the fiarht Welch reached the officers' bugsry, jumped in and drove rapidly away. He bas cot been seen since. Ulrl Frozen to Oemtb. Pr.ATrancROti. N. Y.. Dec. Last Wednesday afternoon Amelia La Born- pard, nineteen years old, started to walk from Wolf Pond. Franklin County, where she had beea visiting, to ber borne in Malono, a distance of fourteen miles. She did not arrive at Malone und diligent search failed to discover her whereabonts natil Monday oooa, when her body was found about three miles from wlwre she starfJd. she bavin? been frozen to deatb. A FRAUDULENT DIVORCE. It Will to Pair of Saw York NEW YORK, Dec. of One of the fraudulent divorce milli in this city has run to earth the proprie- tors of the mill. He is no less a person than William S. Pendleton, who when he bought his divorce was mayor of Fort Worth, Tex. Tho men who sold him the divorce were Duryea Hughes, who says he is the brother-in-law of Mr. Williams, once Attorney General of the United States under Grant, and Patrick H. Campbell, both attorneys practicing in this city. It was not many years ago that Hughes and Campbell were in part- nership, and thoy occupied a dingy lit- tle office at 32-2 Broadway. From tho facts which are presented it would appear that the Superior Court of Cook County, 111., occupied the dingy little office with them, or, if it did not, the men who assumed tho functions of tbe court imprinted its seal with a coun- terfeited die, and forged tho name of Clerk McGrath, of ihat court, to a cer- tificate appended to a document pur- porting to be a divorce, for which Eughes and Campbell received The proof of the forgeries is unques- tionable. The connection of Hughes with the procuring of the counterfeited seal is positive. IT IS NKKDED. A Rill to bo lutr. d-ir-.l In IlllnoU I.ctjrtiilMture for t evntlnn of Oc- l.ik> th" K-an ttnnk Failure. CHICAOO, Dec. 23.- S. A. Koan ACo.'s failus" is Hl.-oly to result in a measure that will benefit the community at large. Inasmuch as tho failure of any bank, whether National. Stato or pilvate, is apt to produce a fedin-j of ppnoral dis- trust, especially in times of stringency of money, several of tho prominent bankers of tho i-Uy have taken the in- itiative in the direction of relief. Those bankers called in Levi Mayer, the load- ing attorney for thn creditors in tha Kean case, to advise with them In re- gard to a law that will prevent occur rences like ttio Koun failure. Tho effect of such a law will be two- will prevent an unsuspecting public from being cheated out of its money, and it will prevent the failure of a rotten concern causing investments to bo withdrawn from legitimato bank- Ing obnnnels. Attorney Mayer has al- ready prepared a rough draft of a bill which is to be submitted to a meeting of bankers and after perfection to bo sent to Springfield. It will be one of tho first measures to come before the next Legislature. _ Donr Up Widow. SAN FuANrtsro, Dec. A yotmfj San Franciscan named Frank Goodwin. while in Now York last Jiirir acquainted with Mrs. F..imian, an gaping blonilo widow, wboin ho finally induced to coxne west with Mm. He represented bor as his wife, litti'd up a flat on which ho snonl, and main- tained her sumptuously. Saturday ho found on his return from a brief ness trip that shn had sold tho furniture and departed for Now York. She car- ried considerable jewelry and 5500 in cash. _ Countnrfelt DUroTered. Doc. 23. Tho mint authorities here have discovoroda coun- terfeit five-dollar gold piece and executed with such rnmarkablo skill that, few experts can distinguish tho spurious coins from tho genuine. It differs from the true coin only In size, being slightly larger in diameter. In order to retire the spurious coin from circulation the mint officials will pur- chase tho bogus coins at their faco value and then destroy them. Tbe counter- feits have an intrinsic value of Dec. Tbe Senate devoted Monday's session to tbe sion of tbe Federal Elections biiL Mr. Hijrzins made long speech in support of the bill and Mr. another long address in opposition to it. Tbe House (pent the day in considering natters pertaining to tbe District of Co- Dertrnvctf. Cmrxoo. Dec. The Casino roller rink earagbt flrc from some un- known caoseresterday, causing a Joss rf 824.000. W. J. Wilson, the jaaiiot, discovered the fire and in trying V> bis furniture was bftdly burned abott the face aad Kcunme H FRANCISCO, Dec. Tho Chi- nese highbinders, after about a month's rest, resumed hostilities Saturday night with tho result that Wong Lee. who runs a sowing machine, now lies in a hospital with a bullet wound clear through his body. His assassin was Chuey Fook, with whom he quarreled a few days ago. As both belong to high- binder societies the music of revolvers will probably bo board again soon. ftoj Brained by a Maniac. NEW Dec. Snnd.iy af- ternoon Edward Duckert, a boy of nine years, was mnrderfd by an insane man named Frank Morris. Toe boy was passing Morris' houso on his bicycle when Morris rushed out of the gate with an axe and struck the boy on the back of the boad with the weapon, kill- ing him instantly. Morris is now under restraint ___ Haps and Mishaps of This BRUTAMTV CRIME: A Stramrr Shipped In ELIZABETH. Pa.. Dec. hull of a steamer designed for South American waters, built hero is about to be shipped to New York and over thirty cars will he required for tbat purpose. It is now being taken apart and loaded on tbe cars. It will ply on tbo river Magda- From New York it will be shipped to Uarranqnilia, near thn mouth of tbe There it will be set op and launched- Part nf an liiy. I1L. Dec. 23. -A man 'o Iw son of Charles Kellozir. formo-'.y of this coun- ty, asserts his tiiie to acres of laad on which is located a part of this rity. He sayn that bis father in 1W5 wrni to Coba, without coavyjnjf the title to the land; tbat it was afterward sold for and tbe title ic not srood. will take steps to recover tbe property._______ on Clot ore Rale. WAsnnwrojr, Dec. Senate Committee on Roles has come to ma jfTreement on the clotnre rnle H will probably be reported to the Sen- ate, alibongrb it may not be called np for consideration until after the holi- I lays, when a quorum of Republican Senators will be present A Girl Terrlbljr Hurt Outraged bjs- Her YOUXOSTOWN. Dec. A shocking- case of brutality and crime on the part of a mother and stepfather coward their daughter has been discovered. parties are Chastino Porter and wife- wnd their daughter, te known as Minnie Smith. They are- colored poopio. The mother has just returned frOui Cleveland, whore she- a sentence in tho workhouse- The girl alleges that during her inoth- %r's absence her stonfathur ropcatedy. assaulted hor and she is soon to be- come a mother. She aXo allosfos that her mother has forced her repeatedly to- criminally intimate with a number- of married HIPTI. I'm" o-io ilay last gave his an awful' Tho srirl to', I hor story to Humane Ludil, I'ortc. and his wife wore T- o is one of tho most borrih'.n the unir.ls of local crime in this city. Toli-do I ..I irc-l. CHICAGO. Dec. 23. Jennio and Lillian: Allen, two sisters who livi.' in Toledo, O., met with si-rious injuii-s Sunday evening in a runaway acciilnnt. They hired a carriage to make some culls. At Archer aveuuo and Clark street a Lake- Shore train dashed by a tl tri-fhteuei tho horst'3. The team with terrific speed. Sfvorai inssers-by tried to stop the horses. The to-.uu continued south on State street and the jumped from tho rarriaro. .lounio sus- tained a compound of her loft leg. Her siit.or foil noun hoi- h'1 ad and. received a fracture of ttioskull. Neither will die. ____ An H'inv'1. ALT-IANPE. Doc. 2'5. JiiinOS Dick, att engineer employed in tho railroad yards hero, met with as roujrn an oxporionce- Sunday as ho possibly oulil inid livo Uv. toll it standing on the track. tho tender of an engine struck hinv knocking him flat on r, .c tru-k, the en- gine passing cni.ro'.y T him, ing the pilot, llo praspcil :in iron rod. and was di-ngpcod bofore the- engino was stopped, when ho crawled out between tho drivers and. to whip the engineer o.i th'j engine. An Klnctrlcinn'A Fnt.il Cr.K.vrt. Doc. 2tl who has been employed for thron years ut the Ilollondon as an oloct.rician, fell from the roof of that building to tho roof of a one-story structure on one side of it, a distance of over sovonty foot, Monday afternoon, and was In- stantly killed. No ono witness tho urci'lont, but an investigation disclosed that ho was fi xini a v.-irn and had evi- dently boon walking b.iokward with it, when he stopped out too far. Etc loaves wife and daughter. MnrilcrrMH on a Wltnosi. ATHICXH, Duo. a farmei' of Bedford township, County, tbo parson Lewis was assailing when the latter was killed with a club by John Hose last Wednesday night, was murderously assailed on tho streets hero tho other night, his unknown as- sailant cutting a long slash through his heavy clothing, a steel brace which be wore warding tho knifo or razor from bis stomach. ISosworth is in Athens as a witness in the Foster murder triaL The Platform Csive Way. 0., Dec. rapher Richard Uano was walking on a frail platform on the rear of his gallery Sunday afternoon when the scantling jave way and lie fell thirty-four foot to in iron roof below, with bis neck squarely across an irou railing. He re- mained unconscious for a long time, and It was thought his neck was broken. was badly cut and bruised, but is still with prospects of recovery. >'lne-flonr n Failure. YOTTXOSTOWN, Dec. 2-2. Last Septem- ber the employes of William B. Pollock Si Co.'s boiler shop asked for and were granted nino hours' labor to cotHtitutc l day's work, at ten bourn' pay. Now tho proprietors notify men that they must return to the ten-hour system? or tho works wiil be shut down. They jlaim that tti'-y can not cornpou; with ibtir rivals by-tuaj. Killed. O., John Stanley., fireman on th" Hocking ValU-y rail- road, was thrown from his engine Sun- Jay at OrovoDort. eight miles loutb of horo. and faliinjr beneath the wheels had his ngat arm cat off tbe shoalder. Ho was brought to this city and at ten o'H'vV. Ho U-ave? a widow and chii'Jr'-n in city. Iv-c. ind two in em- ploy of A ft., intoa w-J.'.'TJ Manning "rpapair af tongs anl hii on 'bi bf-adr him senseless. in; may prove fataL Manning is in jaM. ProhaWy Fatally Hart. at work on Keller, a millwriirht, fell aistanceof aMst thirty feet, on bis back. He U probably fataiiy jured, the entire lower portion of cU body is paralyzed. _ Shot W fr- XEW YOKK. Dec. twenty-six of yesterday afternoca WJ wife, Manhx bis two children himself. The wounded were tw moved to Oonveraeut Eospital.   

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