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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 20, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 20, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE DAILY NEWS. VOL. II. NO. 301. SALEM. OHIO. SATURDAY. DECEMBER 20. 1890. TWO CENTS. A Fight V.'ith Indians In the Bad General Carr'- Troops Have a Skir- mish With the Reds, but Without Auy Definite Results. SUCCESSFUL SWINDLE. FruncUco by a liang oi -.tu Boodle It Is Now Claimed That Sitting Ball Murdered In Cold Blood by Indian Po- lice. PIERKK, S.-D, Doc. Mor- ris, a store-keeper at Cheyenne City, near the mouth of Cherry creek, arrived hero yesterday. Lie says the entire pop- ulation, consisting of twenty families and a number of friendly Indians, have left there, some going to Fort Bennett, gome to Oak and others to Pierre. He says that just before leaving there twenty Indians from Sitting Bull's band arrived a-id bold a big council with the Cherry creok Indians to see whether they should fight or not, and after tho council was over they were joined by ISO Cherokees and started for tne Bad Lands. Morris says that during the time the refugees wore preparing to got away and when the hostilos w-re about a mile distant on their way to the Had Lands sharp firing was heard between the In- dian poiice and the hostiles. A battle was no doubt being fought, but as the Bottlers were nearly frightened to death they made hnste for tho towns and can give no further particulars. CAMP ox CHEYENNE RIVEIC, S. D., Dec. afternoon a soldier re- ported to General Carr that, Captain Stanton and about fifty soldiers were having an engagement with Indians near Wounded Knee. General Carr sent Lieutenant Scott and Troop D to his as- sistance. Some time iater Captain Stanton and the troops returned, when it was learned that some time after noon he noticed a large party of Indians with a herd of ponies coming from the east and beading for the Bad Lands. lie immediately gave chase, and after run- ning some miles gradually drew near the Indians, who began firing at tho troops. Shots were exchanged quite lively for some time, when the Indiana made for a creek called Wounded Knee. This they followed for some distance and wero lost to view in Cad Lands. Captain Stanton followed them for some time, but fearing an ambush withdrew his troops. Most of the Indian ponies were stampeded during the firing. OMAHA, Xeb., Doc. special from Camp Carr, on Cheyenne river, says John Farnbam, who has been in the em- ploy of the (lovernrno'it as a scout, was yesterday placed under arrest by order of General Carr, under instructions from. General Miles. Farnhr.m is suspected of giving information concerning tho movements of tho troops along the Cheyenne river to tho hostilos. Farn ham is married to an Ogallala squaw The troops at this camp aro ready for forward movement as soon as orders are received and if given permission wil have no difficulty in penetrating to tho Indian stronghold. The Indians havo been firing the grass in tho basin north of the White river slope and it is though to be a signal to Sitting Hull's warriors Bts.MAiirK, K. D., Dec. 20.-It is claimed that Sitting Hull was murderei in cold blood. Corporal Gunn, of to Eighth cavalry, who was with tho troop that went out in support of tho India police, savs that the Indian police di not like Sitting Bull. Every Indian at the agencv, except Bull's immediate followers, was jealous of tho lattc-r's prominence as a chief and only too glad of an opportunity boing afforded undor Government protection to shoot him dead. Corporal Gunn says: "Lieutenant Bullhead, of the Indian police, went to Sitting Bull's house, opened tho door and commenced reading the warrant for his arrest Sitting Bull and his two sons, one a la'l of tivelve. were the only persons in tho shack. He carried arm? like all Indians. The boy came to tho door and gave a cry of alarm on seeing the house surrounded by police. Tie no sooner cried out than Bullhead, without a moment's hesitation and before any resistance was offered, fired at Sitting Bull, the bail piercing his breast imme- diately over the1 left nipple. As he was staggering ho managed to draw his re- rolver and one shot while falling, tho bullet lodtriig in Bullhead's thigh. Sittinz Bull f'.-ll about six feet away from the door. His horse standing near tho K'.'d Tomahawk jumped upon it and flew to tho troops with the news that Sitting Bull waa killed. "Crow Foot, tho boy. was next killed and he fell across the body of his father. The combat was then hand to hand, SiUinff Bull's "nragod rising up from thf brush liko But shots were fired. Guns were ciuhbpd. The stocks to splinters and the barrels badly bont The Indian polico soon found capped and in Bull's de- serted shark. Outside four of their own  y the company at par value in payment or the coal. Canvassers were employed and a large business was done. A. F. irunbroo'c wns announced as thf presi- dent: A. C. MacAuley. vice president; Ayre Chapin. t-easurer: K. Willard, sec- retary, and M. MacAuley assistant sec- retary. MacAulcv and llrunbrook came 3ero for a f'-'.v Juvs. On Docuuibxir 15 the wholo outiit disappeared and noth- has since been heard from thorn. YOKKEKS TOO LATE. Unfavorable Keports From Many Business Centers. Complaints of Monetary Stringency and Slow Collections are Al- most Universal. OiVPMlV'C! HIV HAMiMAJlo UAi, Five Murderers Swung Off Eternity. Executioner Plays a Leading1 Part at Sherbrooke, Drops Dead. A Hesitating Feeling Noticed on All Sides, Notwithstanding Euorm us to Foreign NEW YOKK. Dec, G. Dun A Co.'s Review of Trade says: Business continues large for the season, but there is perceptible less feeling of confidence. The causes appear to be: First, pros- pect of important monetary legislation, the effects of which are not clearly fore- seen; second, frequent failures and greater difficulties in making collec- tions; and third, less satisfactory condi- tions in some large branches of Indus- try. Though the rate for money on call is lower than a week ago and money U easier at Boston and Philadelphia, there is still stringency at most points throughout the country. Complaints of slow collections havo lately been more general. Exports of products for two weeks of December from York show a gain j roar Indians Mount the With Firm Steps anil Meet Their Kmte With StolcUra Characteristic uf Their SHEUBROOKE, Que., Decs. rtontasjne, the murderer of Napoleon Hicbel, his brother-in-law, was hanged a the jail yard Friday morning. Yes- terday's tragedy was a double one, for t involved the death of Sheriff Webb as irell. A few minutes before nine o'clock ihe sheriff arrived at the jail and was idmitted to jailer Reed's private apart- nents. Three minutes later messengers rere running for doctors, but when one irrived the sheriff was dead. Death was lue to acute heart failure, induced by sxcitementc It was a gloomy crowd that flled out into the yard where tho gal- lows waa erected and this incident less- ened the sympathy that was felt for the murderer. At tho procession proceeded to tho scaffold erected in tho jail y ird. of night per cent over last year, and the j Radcliffe, Birchall's orlici- ,b b. _ ____ ted on this occasion. La Montagne A Firm Attnchon in Pa., In to Fore- stall Action by tiothnm WII.KKSKAHKK, Pa., Dec. 20. The dry aud carpet stores conducted in the name of F. I. Orr, of Brooklyn, X Y. were made subjects of closure for the sheriff on judgments in favor of Frederick Victor Acbelis, of New York, in the sum of and the sheriff was directed to made the execu- tion yesterday. Boyd, White Co., of Philadelphia, secured a foreign attach- ment against the property at a late hour Thursday night and their writ was served early Friday morning, thus fore- stalling tho execution in the hands of the sheriff. Boyd, White Co. gave bond in the sum of and retain possession of tho disputed property. The stores, which havo been knowji as Orr's Fair, here and in Brooklyn, have been the subject of much sensational litigation in the last few years. The business was in tho name of Mrs. Flora I. Orr, but was conducted by Joseph H. Orr, her husband. KS'rcts of Lyinpli. PniLADKurHiA, Dec. 20. The patient from Laramie, Wyo. who is being treated with Koch's 13-mph at the Jef- ferson hospital, received another in- oculation Thursday. The gentleman is suffering from incipient tuberculosis of the lungs and larynx, and following the injection he exhibited tbo various symptoms described by Dr. Koch. The three patients being treated at the University of Pennsylvania exhibit slight reaction. No other symptoms ex- pect those expected developed. Miners" Strike Grows More Alarming. BIKMINUHAM, Ala., Dec. The miners' strike threatens to close every industry in this district. Tho Amal- gamated Association of Steel and Iron have agreed to refuse to work with coal mined by convict or scab miners if the strikers ask them to do so. Patrick of the United Mine Workers of America, says if ho can not settle tbo strike he will call out all the iron and steel workers. The strike has already seriously injured business and there sc-ews no prospect of settlement. total last December was hardly ever surpassed. Though imports continue heavy, they are greatly exceeded by ex- ports at present. Exports of cotton thus far this month exceed last year's, and also of provisions, but there is a heavy decrease in grain, caused by speculative prices here. At Chicago money is firm and there is confidence in the immediate future. At Milwaukee and Detroit trade is good, at Cleveland fair and at Cincinnati very quiet in wholesale lines. Pittsburgh reports more confidence, trade in manu- factured iron and in glass slower and Bessemer blooms lower. Eastern cities feel the effects of expected legislation, and recent failures, but also of prosenc monetary relief. Confidence improves at Boston and though money is easier at Philadelphia, the noteworthy feature is the general difficulty of collections. Iron shows more improvement at Phila- delphia and here. The dry goods trade fools the influ- ence of recent failures and of stringency in commercial loans. Trade in cotton goods is not so large as usual, and tnough print cloths are down to three cents, the first time for several years, stocks on hand are pieces. A HKKO AT KEST. Big t. I PT. Tr." affair? of R ?.r. roa: -V-a'T and buiider at a suburb of ibis city, wr" in "r." bar.-i' a receiver Litt'e JCTJOWTI about the condition of affairs. Tbe ar" to however, that ino fail short oT Tr.e are a doubtful  'ot Tleld. BKDKOHH, Mass., Dec. 20. The Strike of the Acusbnet mill spinners is not M-ltled, a committee having failed to reach an agreement with the officials. The strikers say they will stay out until their doroands are granted. Many of the weavers in tho mill hare boon obliged to ijuit work on account of the filling giving out. _ A I litial Doc. Go0rge Winn. superintendent of tho Allegheny City fire and police pntro! electrical department, from the roof of a ptory building on Manhattan street Fri- day and was instantly killed. It is -h" ?hat oari.o in contact with a. wir" and was knocked from the roof by a shock of electricity. Man .I..hn A. Smith, man Nc-wark, i.f-i to 'Jr. i'Ii ryarail- Ho Nr.w Y.. a v..-is roa-d att'.-r.' p-j'.hrr bis d a train as it station and Interasi -0. A Svc of ;be c-r- as Fonerftt Services at New Haven, Conn., of the Major Trrry. IVEW HAVE.V, Conn., Doc. The re- mains of Major General Alfred Howe Terry, the taker of Fort Fisher, were placed in their last resting place Friday afternoon. At one o'clock the services were held at the homo of tho deceased hero, for the members of tho family only. The remains wore then transferred to the United church, whore the public was allowed to gaze upon the face of the deceased, and at two o'clock public serv- ices were begun by Ilev. Mr. Munger. After the services, the remains were tranferred to the Grove Street Ceme- tery, whucc tue interment took place. In accordance with the wishes of the family there was no pomp, civic or mili- tary, as the procession wended to the cemetery. _ MUCH TALK, LITTLE WORK. Much Oratory In the --'enatc BilU Pained by thn Hou-e of WASHIXOTON. Dec. Mr. Stan ford yesterday adclrc-sccl the Senate at in support of hH Government loan bill. The bill wits rcfrrrert to tho Finance Committee The Printing Deficiency bill was passed. Mr B air made .1 long humorous p explana tion to show the faliiity or a published story that he was not on good terms with tho Presi dent. Mr. Bate. Mr. Gibson and Mr. Stewar spoke in opposition to the Federal Elec lions bill H' The House agreed to the conference report cm the hill on the Bal tiraor" Potomac Rni ron-l Pompany In tha District of Co'nmbia and the conference report on the bill the act to ilivid-j the reser- vation of the Sioux Indians in Dakota. Shot HltTtnelf anrl Two BCP.I.IXOTON JUNCTION. Mo., Dec. 20. C. E. Dyche, proprietor of the Coramer- bial Hof-1. shot himself with suicidal intent Thursday night. He committed the act in the hotel parlor, and in try- ing to wrest the revolver from him Mrs. Combs, his mother-in-law, and F. M. Baker were both shot. Dycbe was shot in tho left breast and is fatally wounded. Baker was shot in the left groin. Mrs. Combs was wounded slight- ly in the right hand. Domustic trouble and jealousy are assigned as the causes. Six Were QCF.I-.KC- Dec. Two bodies were found Friday in the wreck at St. Joseph. The full and official list of the dead is as follows: Alex Dessaint, Karoour- aska: Joseph Leclerc, Levis; J. P. Kamoiiraska: Max New fiiaTow: Gauvin. St. I'ocome; Napoleon Bois, St. Joseph. Mr. Des- was almost bovond rer- orni'ion. H': was member of Parlia- rnf-nt for Kamouraska and was forty- three year of age. atj'l ThlM to NEWARK. N. J., Dec. A two-story bouse Doufi street, owned and by Mm Ann Mc- (rsjire. yesterday morning. Mrs. and her five-year-old Annie Donovan, wre burned rr sp. woman's husbar.-i. Joba McGwire, scaped by jcajDing from a The fire is be- '.iered to be the result of a spark drop- Diaz from a pipe that McOcire bad beea smoking in bed. topped on the scaffold, knelt down anil as absolved. lie rose and, loosing va- antly before him, repeated a formula Sat he soon hoped to be in heaven, and id not reg-ret it. Tho noose was ad- usted, the signal given, the weight fell nd the doomed man was jerkfnl up into he air five feet There were some con- ulsive movements and then the body ung motionless. In four minutes julse was hardly perceptible, two min- utes Inter it ceased to beat and in four- een minutes life was declared to bo ex- inct. Death resulted from strangula- ion. The murdor for which La Montague was hanged was a cold-blooded crime ind tho story of the circumstances lead- ng to it ii revolting. The murdered man. Napoleon Michel, had suspected ,hat his wife was criminally and unnat- urally intimate with La Montague, who was her own brother, and charged the alter with the crime. One evening in fuly, 1883, after Michel and his wife lad retired. La Montague went to the louse with a bottle of whisky. The :ouplo arose ami sat for a while with their visitor, drinking thn liquor. When La Montagno left, Michol accompanied iim a short distance to light him o.-t hia way. They had gone but a few yards when La Montagne turned upon Michel and fired two shots at his head. Michel fell and when ho regained consciousness tie found hinlself in his own kitchen, his throat cut, his wrist nearly detached from tho arm and all about him in flames. He crawled through a window, managed to reach tho house of a neigh- bor, where he told his story and died in a few hours. La Montagne and Leda Michel, tho deceased's wife, were arrested. The former fled and the latter managed to secure an acquittal on the charge of be- ing an accomplice. She went to the United States. Her brother hid in the woods until a reward of was of- fered by the government for his arrest. Feeling sure that he could not bo con- victed he went; to a friend, who handed him ovor to tho police, it boing under- stood that tho money should bo us d by tho friend to pay tho expenses of tho do- fense. The recreant wife was arrested in Boston on the charge of arson and was extradited, but she refused to testi- fy and was sentenced to one year's im- prisonment and fined for contempt of court. MISSOLT.A, Mont, Doc. 20. gro at- est hanging that ever took place in Montana occurred Friday morning when Pierre Paul, Lalaze, Antley and Pascal, tho four Indian murderers, were hanged. All died game. Thoy took tboir places on tho trap without trembling and when the caps wore being drawn ovor Ant- ley's and Pierre Paul's faces both smiled. Pierre Paul and Pascal said they were guilty and v.-oro ready to die like men. The trap fell at and the necks of the four Indians were broken. A priviite mnsijtierftde ball was held in Hi'gsm's hall last night. Deputy Sheriff Moffett, of New Lisbon, was in the city this afternoon. Hart, of East Palestine, was a visitor to this city, on business. Rev. C. L. Morrison, of West Point, Vn., is visiting L. T. Povr uud family, of Broad- way. Miss Sadie Forney, of Columbia street, left to-day to visit friends at Unity until after the bolidajs. A. C. Maerkle, a former employe at Clark's, but for some time employed iu St. Louis, Mo., Las returned to this city. The Christmas entertainment fit the Presbyterian church will be held on Thurs- day afternoon, beginning at 4 o'clock. Miss Kixte L. Snffonl, assistant principal of the high schoul, weut homo to Madison, O. this morning to her parents. Mrs. F. Ycjugliug, was called to At- wntor this morumij; by the serious illness of her mother it. iu th-j S2ud your of her age. The Poniisvlvunia CD'S, corp of survey- ois, the survey of tho Huts ves-teivlny, iiinl ri-turnoil to Pitts- Imry tin- Prof. Dyer, principal of tho high school, >tiu ted this iiuiruiug for his homo, Piit- ti-isou, O., uud will spend tho holi'liiy's with Lii ami fiiemls. ,lule Picket, of tho Duebor Wiitch works, of Clinton, is visiting liis jinronts in this i-ity, nii'i will clerk at tlio titoie of S. Wilson, during the holiday V. Jumos McDowell iiml wife who have bocu vi-iitincf their parents, iu this city returned to their home, iu Denver Falls tbis tuurii- iteeord or Ifeccnt Eve-its in the Buckeye State. TWO MOitK VICTIMS. Jacob Barber, a former resideut of this city ami who has beon iu San Francisco, Oil., for the past seven years, is visiting his father, JoUu Baibor, ou street. The attractions at the Grand during Christmas -week will be tbe Dear Irish Dotnnau Thompson's Two Sisters uud Agues Wiillm-o Villa iu "The World Against Her." The Sulcm Baptist Siiuiluy school will produce n grand Cimtata Cliristnms oven- ing. This Cantata was presented tho school three j pars ago, at which time the huililing wns crowded to its full capacity. Forty people will tako part iu tho perform- ance. The C. II. Rtrntlon Carriage Co., shipped yesterday to Los California, u cur load of coinbiiiiition Among tlio lot were four liu'mheil iu uuliirul with quartered oak panels on the bodies. The company also shipper! lifty sets of jump- seat irons to Cincinnati. A Man Wlto Injured In tin- Jk Lake Wreck at DoUrnr. O.. From Thnlr Condition of Othrr Doc. -20. deaths have beou added to the four origiually from the Wheeling" Lake Erie railroad at Bolivar on Thursday. are Leonard Weid- tnan, of Marietta, O., and bis They were reported among the list of wounded undor the name of Leonard Whitman and Mrs. Louisa Piper, of Pike township, .Siark County. The last name of Henry Hill and Bister, Hill, of Shi'lby County, 111., n-i 3rst pub- lished should bfl Muuror. They were> on their way to visit relatives at, Holi- var. Neither aro ser'otisU 'dinnvl. (ii-iiinui. of is an oxmnsut- invii'-i on !.ui-> ro was not seriously liiiru L m. Us, con- ductor: Hull, of Siicrro !svillor and Ira rowi'.i, of Norwilk, are nil rost- iiiLT and rivtivt-r. Thei'o i co'i-i'.iln-.iii.i' u almlit tb.O recovery of ('tnrl.-  train, but. she was on !i way to Union- port, O. There wai  liv Sage. United Stato-i Marshal Simmons vi.sitoil tliu institution lo servo tho pa- per ho was informf I mt, no per- son as named in the writ was confined In tho jail. Tlio wric aad its sorvlco upon tho cnstoilian of tho jail was only a matter o( f.inn. nooossury as part of tho procco'liuirs. luul boon prosecuted by Food and Dairy Commissioner. It was. not intended that lie ahould servo the- sontenco, but rather that it bo used as o- baais to the con.ititutioniility of ilie. law govorning such matters. Tlio ques- tion to aririiod is whether tho .State- law regulating tho sale of oleomarga- rine is applicable where goods brought into tho S'aio. Furtluu- pro- ceedings will bo cominoncoii shurtly. SHOI'S. delinquent Salem at Wellfwille and Railway Collision. Col., Dec. 20. A collision occurred at Cardiff, on the Colorado Mid- land yesterday, by the eastbound pas- senger train running into the roar end of a freight train, demolishing the ca- boose and killing one man who was asleep and injuring three or fourothers. The freight was trying to got into a switch, but the train was too long for tbe sidetrack and could not get out of the way quick enough for tbe passenger, which was coming at full speed. An Suicide NEW YORK, Dec. 20. Tbe dead body of a man was found in tbo basement of Tompkins market Friday morning. He- side the body was a revolver with one of its five chambers empty. He had shot himself throngh the heart. Tbe suicide was Frederick Boehro. '.wentv- three years old, an Anarchist In his pockets were found two be- ing Bellamy's "Looking Back ward" and Toin Paine's "Age of Reason." Daring From .full. Tex., Dec. Bolton, who has been in jail -Juarez last April for the killing of J. fl Oaviu. es- caped Thursday night and is now on American soil. Bolton. disguised with 1 a false mustache, walked on t erf tbe jail. entered a carriage and WM immediately driven to tbis side. rto-ar .IS. Michaol Da-itt. in a denying tnat was tcrowa at Paraell at Castle oa Monday says that ice truth was Soar and mad by woaea aad giria of the place. Bookmakers Heavily ELIZABETH. N. J., Dec. TV- bookmakers on trial in tbe r tioas Court here yesterday withdr'- plea of not guilty. book-: were fined on each coanv o- si.000 for both. Two employes were S-cod 5-J30 M each indictment, or fMO in alL tbe SUNDAY SERVICES Young Peoples' Meeting at the F'rcp- byterian church, to morrow, will he h-d by Miss Mamie Grist-lie. Subject, reasons why Christ came to the earth. Y. M. C- A. The young men's meet- ing to-morrow at 4 p. m.. will he led by C. L. Thompson. Lincoln Avenue Church Morning subject: The; Coming of Chrict even- ing subject, The Coming to Christ. ReprncumtatlviK of the Trirtt lie- ctpnob tlio In Com- bine, Srm.SdFiKi.n, O., Doc. '30. -Thn in- spnction i-ommittoo of tho groat r.-.-ipor com b i no, tlio American Hoapor pany. were in tho city Thursday Ing the eligible shops. Sovon in- the trust woro represented. It is dofi- nitoly learnod that tho works? of Kushnoll and tho three groat shops of Araoa Co. ai-o included in tho combine, but. under what terms is not made known.. Tho Whitnly works will rnanufaJ-Uirfoi parts of harvesting ia uddlt.ion to the Champion. The fate of the East strict works, now not run.- ning, is not known, but it is boliovsj? will involved in tho ilr-al. Tlio matter will be decided npon at, a mffting of tho directors J.in- uary 9 at Chicago. General A. S. l'u-ih- nell is spoken of for the general man- agership of tlio big now A KOOM AFFICAY; New I.UI....I MHII Id'lly Cut n. Xir.v LiHii'ix, O., Dr-c. VVed- Doaday night a catting affray Mornir.gmibjPctatM. K. rhurcti. lo-j which may rosult in the death oC The Measure of the Gift of, 'no of tho pari.cipants. John Morrison- morrow, Christ; evening subject. Lahor in the Lord not in vain. Yonng IVopUV Meeting at 6 p. m topic, How to nnrier- stand the -Scriplurss leader, Miss Klla Griffith. CTienille Table Cover innkes n pleasing Cljristujft'i will fringe at TbeiieWfiiitterns I'.WAN BEOS. fail V> ece our Kangaroo Calf, Cork Sole Sboe, at the Opera House Shoe Store. and T. W. bucatne involved in a and Murrii-oii hoad witu a quarrel in a itruck Kloru'i': yvur thn is nothing that makes a more nsefnl or acceptnblt: Cliri'.trnas present than a pair of You can at Tbnmtn .V, 7'M hatchet, inflicting three dangerous cuts. John Morrison is twenty-three years old and is a son of lawyer Harvey Morrison, of this place. Klaman tho superin- tendent of tho Kag'o firebrick worKs. o' Ibis Morrison skipped out im-- mediatoiy aft'-r doing the cutting and Kloman is lying in a critical condition. the House. '.3 tho- of trie parties an Citort was mado tuLu.-jii iho a.Tjiir up. A N'-w Vji "riU-y. son of ffToi Table and Oil apd i pr.70 3. W Bird Cages, go to D. B. Burford'n. Xo. togt night, has befn nn for Flag O., DT. John M. v. W. W. a and who 'o-i'c f5 rst con- 19 Main street GTOnr .lock 92tf I }j_ with Porket Cnt- of his oration on "The AiUto, (tt I fliMC r Shears His Mission from one of iiiitrs" or.-ilions. It and price" very reasonable, at tbe Main Street Hardware. new bnsinew ft the Life Assnwnce Society of tbe U. S., tbe first two weeks of tbe amount of work dome in period last December by over three millions. ad. in another column of this paper. See yon have the headache? Are you troubled -with sleeplessness? Are you ner- TOUS? The Electric Headache sold at Phillips' Broadway Drug Store, will gire JOB immediate relief. Warranted. that were taken bodi- ly. Crilt-y claims that be read Pr.i oration and be probably some of i- TC.O facuitj will Foatxl tm m O., DOC. Harvoy Mar- Cum, aged thirty-three years, hvinir in. Swan township, this county, foaad. dead near a log in the open field near bUbome Toursdaj. He had gone oa the day be'oie to M assiat in butchering, and returning homes at eight in the storm sank to the near the log, dislocating his neck,   

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