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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 19, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 19, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 300. SALEM. OHIO. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19. 1890. TWO CENTS. A RA1LM VERY CKITICA.L, The Indian Outbreak Likely to Ended by the ExttrtiUnatlon of thn Hostiles. PINE Rior.n. S. D.. Dec. Five Persons Instsiniiy Killed al military yestordav counted the returned St. Joseph, Que. An Inter-Colonial Express Jumps the Track. Carrying its eers Down to Death. Purser. KPT to Picoei by Striking a i Injnreid, Four i QuizBEr, Dec. express train from Halifax on the Inter-Coloniai rail- i way, which w.-w due Lev is at I o'clock Thursday morning, met with a frightful accident about three miles i from its destination. The scene of the wreck is an embankment at St. Joseph. The train was made up of baggage car, mail car. two coaches and one sleeping car. It was running at high speed and after passing St. Joseph station the seeocd class car jumped the track at the end of the station sidinjj on a curve and i dras-ged the ftrst class car and the sleep- er with it, and also derailed the mail car and baggage car. The three passen- ger cars ran diagonally along the om- I bankment for 200 the second i class car striking the western abutment of the bridge, which carried the track over the public highway at this point. It was in this car that the sacrifice of life occurred, the car being smashed to atoms against thesolidstonoabutments. The three cars turned over, the firsts class car boing badly shattered- Fortu- nately the curve on which they were running threw the cars away from each other, and though the heavy sleeper was carried half the length of the first class car, it ran alongside of it instead of crushing through, as it would have done on a straight line. The sleeper was not so badly smashed as the other cars. The engine, still drawing the bag- gage and mail cars, passed over the bridge, the timbers of which were badlj broken up by the two cars derailed by the plunge of those in the rear. After passing the bridge the mail car went down the embankment, having appar- ently turned completely over in its de- scent. The engine and derailed bag- gage car continued on, passing over a second road bridge safely and were brought to a standstill a few hundred yards further on. As soon as the news of the disaster reached the city a num- ber of physicians crossed the river ani went down on a special train to the scene of the disaster. The dead are flve in number. Their names are, Dionne, Gauvin, Blais, Le- claire and Winner. The latter was news agent on the road. The conductor. Walker, was badly hurt and thirty-five were injured, four fatally. Gauvin was a resident of St. Charles and had boarded the train a few minutes before the crash came which killed him. Leclaire was a young resident of Levis who had met the incoming train at Norlake, tho last stopping place. The accident happened in the center of St. Joseph village. Aid was immedi- ately given by tho residents and the houses were thrown open for the recap- tion of the dead and wounded. The city authorities were prompt and energetic in sending down surgeons and other as- sistance and citizans of Levis and Que- bec hurried to the scene in large num- bers. The clergy of St. Joseph were also on the spot giving consolation to the wounded and dying. The damage to the track is trifling, but the two bridges are badly wrecked and it will take some time to repair them. recalcitrants and S-ued rations to them. There were A grand council was held Wednesday nisrht. Ued Cloud told them that his heart was broken. They had caused a d'-al of troub'o and now their w-30 iiere la very serious thi-v at present, there boing so much stock herd and they wero eating his rations. A seems imminent. The hostiles are in tbe iJad Lands about miles to the northwest. There are no more than fisrhting men. Gen- eral Carr is c'.osa in thoir roar and their case is hopeless. PIKRUE. S. D.. Indian scout has arrived at Fort Bennett bring- ing word that Sitting Bull's followers, who escaped when their chief was killed, bad camped at the mouth of Thunder creek, on tho Morcau river, be- ing ori their way to tho Bad Lands. This point is sixty miles from Fort Bennett and on a direct line to Big Foot's and Low Dog's hostile camps on Cherry creek. Colonel Mprriam's command of the Seventh regiment h-is left Fort Sully and crosiirl tho Missouri at Fort Bennett to the hostiles at Creek ford on iai> Choy-3nno river. Should Sitting followers combine with Bijr r.nd Low braves, as they no doubt will, they will greatly outnumber the troops and it is thought may make an attack on them in revenge or Bull's death. DKVVSR, Pol dispatch rom Rapid Citv savs: A courier brings he tidings that fifteen men are be- ieged by the Indians oa Spring creek, at )aly's ranch. Three attemots have been made by the hontilcs to fire the ranch, ne of which was nearly successful, 'he courier had to ftgbtbls way through be Indians. General Carr has sent lajor Tupper with ono hundred men to he rescue, and if the Indians are en- ountered by the Major and his force, hort work will be made'of them. A The Great Snow Storm in Eastern States. Double Execution in the Ohio Penitentiary. SCENE OP TERROR. lumatf-i "I a Kurnln_ I" Railway Traffic Badly Interfered With and in Some Cases Suspended. IN CONGRESS. Number of Passed In Both Branched Debates. Dec. The Sen- ate yesterday passed a resolution calling Tor a report from the fish commissioner on the pro posed flsh hatchery in Northern New York. The bill to terminate reflnctlon In number of mem- beraof the engineer corps of the navy was passed. A bill to define certain treaty stipulations was debated and then placed on the calendar. Speeches on the Elections bill were made t j Mssars. Coke. CulJoia. Cockrell and Bate. A number of building bills and private reliet measures were The House passed the following Sen- ate WHS: To bridge the Green and Barren rivers, Kentucky: to provide lor taking deposi- tions in inter Stat" commerce hearings: au- thorizing Albany. Ore., to bridge the Willamet- te river; authorizing Hrniplrers County. Tenn.. to brirtce the river. The Shipping was debated at iength, but went over w.th action. _ Parochial 'WASHWOTOS', Dec. 19. The Census Office has in press a. preliminary bulle- tin on education, prepared by James IL Blodgett The imperfect results of the inquiry regarding private and parochial Kbools in each State, hero reported, ibow a large attendance of pupils, espe- sially in Wisconsin. In that State there hare been reported 31.000 Catholic pupils. Lutheran, more than 300 Evangelical, and less numbers in Dther parochial schools. Roasted to Death. BATAVIA, 5. Y.. Dec. Mrs. Fodo- ra Dimbler. a idow arol living a b'.rriM" Wed- nesday night. Sh a lamp 3n the store irnit In an instant enveloped Same. Mr. asi Mrs. wbocatne to were 'se- verely sc terribly burned that gfaediM yesterday. Killed Bta Cat. Dec. Dr. Y. O. Vincent yesterday at the resi- iaace of his wife, Irons -bom he separated, aad saortij a? er scot bet lead. He arrested and taken to prison, where Sell into aocoaseioss- aen. bavin; taken poison. The cause of the tragedy unknown. NEW YORK. Dec. 'A all the bos- pitals where patients have been inocu- lated with Dr. Koch's tuberculosis iyiBpfa tbey are said to be doing well. la mos of cases tae injections hare acted u atonic. Elmer Sharkey and Henry Popp Pay the Penalty for Their Crimes. BLOCK 1NGALLS. Action of the Kn 'Bis May Delay tho of the Elections and Finan- cial Relief Kills by tho Senate. WASHINGTON, Due. financial measure reported from the Finance Committee of th9 Senate has come in conflict already with the Elections bill, and tho chances am qroatlv against the jassago of cithor of thorn before Janu- ary 1. When the caucus adjourned Wednes- day night a motion had boon agreed to authorizing- Senator Aldrich to report to Senate a proposition to change the rules so as to establish the previous question during- the remainder of this session of Congress. The understand- ing of the Western Senators, who are interested in the passage of the flnan- ial bill, was that the bill agreed to in caucus would be reported to the Senate at the earliest possible day and that the Elections bill would be laid aside for it. The Eastern Senators, who are not very favorably disposed towards the cau- cus bill, voted for it with the under- standing that its fato would be linked with that of tho Elections bill, and that the new rule would be reported and passed before the caucus bill was taken up. In accordance with this Sena- tor Aldrich called a mooting of i.he Com- mittee on Rules yesterday, but Senator Ingalis declined to attend the meeting because he is among the Senators op- posed, to considering a change of rules before the financial measure is taken up. As the Democratic Senators would not attend the meeting there was no quorum and therefore the mooting could not be held. Senator Ingalis will not attend a meeting of the committee before bis departure for the West Sunday; therelore tne new rule will not be re- ported from the committee before Janu- ary L _______________ in the Errand TrtaL Dec. the trial of Mich- ael Eyraud and Gabricllo I'.ompard yes- terday for tne murder of Gouffe, Dr. Brouardel deposed that Gabrielle was sane, though deficient in moral percep- tion. Other evidence was given show- ing that the woman was susceptible to hypnotism. It was suggested that she might have been brought under Ey- raud's influence by this moans. At this point Eyraud created a scene in court by shouting that nothing of the kind had ever occurred and that Gabrielle was fooling the doctors by pretending to submit to hypnotism. Correctly Sizp'l Up lit" Situation. Ti3c. States Treasurer H- was asked yesterday on his return irom tho West his opinion of the Republican caucus plan for in- creasing tbe volume of currency. He said he bad not read tbe pian. but any- one who bad just come frora the West knew of tbe Tyinj need for more money. More money manded by the- people and well for to ency of th" Situation Conntrj Roads Impasnable. Owlnff to the Great Depth of Snow, Often Reaching a Depth of Two Feet on the Lerel. LOCK HAVEN, Pa.. Deo. snow storm, after raging: thirty-sis hours, ceased Thursday morning. There are two feet of snow on the ground. Manj fruit and other trees have been badly damaged by the breaking of limba under the weight of snow. BKLLEFOXTE, Pa., Dec, 19.-The Belle- fonts Snowrshoe branch of the Penn- sylvania railroad, the Tyrone Clear- field branch and the Lewisburg Ty- rone branch are all snowed up, no trains having been sent out yesterday. The snow is two feet deep on tho level here. It has ceased snowing, but the weather Is very cold. In many places in the country the public roads are impassable. WILKRSBAKKB, Pa., Dec. rain and snow have been raging here for the past thirty-six hours. It is the heaviest storm seen in the valley for some yeara Trains on all the railroads running into the city are reported snow- bound. The serious wire trouble which exists in all directions prevents par- ticulars being obtained of the damage done by the storm In the country dis- tricts. PuiLADEi-rinA, Dee. Flye Mile Beach railroad, which runs from Cape May Court House to Anglesea, N. J., has been washed away for a distance of three and one-half the track being piled up against the telegraph poleg. Communication with Anglesea can only be bad by means of boats. At Sea Isle City considerable damage was done. The railroad from that point to Ocean City, which runs along the beach, was badly damaged, as is also the road to Avalon. Washouts are numerous and it will be several weeks before commu- nication with these points is fully re- stored. The bridges across Townsend's [nlet and Carson's Inlet are damaged. At Reading, Pa., a chimney was blown over and Miss Ella Grath was struck by the fragments and probably fatally in- jured. ELMIKA, N. Y., Dec. .nches of snow have fallen here. Street car traffic on all lines has been aban- doned. It was ten o'clock Thursday morning before a train oa anv road got to this city. The high wind drifted cuts full of snow and even driving in tho city was difficult The first Erie train through from New got in at eleven a. m. Miller's livory stable col- lapsed under the weight of snow and several hacks and carriages were smashed. Two men in the barn nar- rowly escaped with their lives. PITTSBURGH, Dec. storm is over. Business has again re- sumed and no more trouble is appre- hended as long as the snow lies on the ground. A sudden thaw or heavy rain, however, would cause a disastrous flood, as there are from eighteen inches to tbree feet of snow in the mountains and throughout Western Pennsylvania. The railroad blockade has been raised and all trains east and west were nearly on time yesterday. The street cars are again running and the electric light, telephone, fire alarm tnd police tele- graph linos are in operation as usual, so that if it were not for the mantle of whiteness that envelops every thing the city would present its wonted ap- pearance. The storm was one of the heaviest in years and was the most de- structive ever experienced in this city. The actual fall of snow was eighteen inches. Me., Doc. storm has covered tbe troos and wires with ice, doing considerable damage. Tne wires are down all over the city and a large force of men is at work putting them up. A team of six horses attached to a street railway plow ran afoul of a live electric wire and three horses were killed. Down the harbor, the vessels had a hard time of it. The fishing schooner Glad Tidings is at Fort Beach. A schooner is ashore at Ferry Slip: the schooner City Point is ashore on Long Island and the schooner Eva Race is ashore atHarpswelL Thursday morning several rockets were fired by a vessel in distress off the Cape. XctUIsg can yet be learned of the identity of the vessel. All over the oity tbe driving rain beat in under the eaves of roofs, doing great damage to interiors. The Former Vent HIi Aged Mother to Death. While the Latter Stabbed a Sa- Smith Respited (or the Eijhth Time. COI.UMBVS Dec. Sharkey and Henry Popp wore executed by hang- ing in the annex of the Ohio peniten- tiary early this morning. Sharkey was the first to go. and, contrary to expec- tation, be did not weaken. He stepped on the scaffold at and sixteen min- utes later was pronounced dead. His neck was not broken and death resulted from strangulation. He made no con- fession nor statement from the gallowi. simply saying: "I will answer to God for what 1 have done and forgive all." Eight minutos after Sharkey was pro- nounced dead, his body had been re- moved and the scaffold prepared for Popp, who stepped out from the death cell at In less than one minute his arms and legs had been pinioned, the black cap and rope adjusted and the lever pulled which launched bins into eternity. His neck was broken by the fall and he died without a struggle. While Sharlrey's mother was lying in bed at her home in Preble County, in January, 18S9, he beat her on the head with a maul until she was dead. Later in the night he appeared at a neighbor's house, in an apparently dazed condition, and stated that burglars had attacked the house and, he feared, had killed his mother. An examination of the bouso showed that several windows had been broken in, as though by burglars. Tho bloody maul was found on the porch covered with brains and gray hair from the murdered woman's head. Many minor circumstances seemed to point to Sharkey himself as the murderer and ha was arrested. Pending the coroner's inquest ho con- fessed having committed the crime, but declared afterward that this confession had been extorted from him through fear. A plea of epileptic insanity was urged in his behalf, but he was con- victed before the courts of two different counties, and the Supreme Court of the State, tho State Board of Pardons and the Governor have all passed adversely upon his case. He was twenty-two years old at the time of his crime. His motive, it was alleged, was a fear that his mother would disinherit him if ho should marry a young lady to whom he was engaged. Henry Popp killed a saloon-keeper at Canton, O. He had been assisting in some work about tbe saloon, in return for which the saloon-icoeper gave him sufficient liquor to make him drunk. He then became noisy and was ejected. Returning after a short time he was again put out He then came back and fatally stabbed the saloonist At tho trial his guilt was admitted, but tho plea of intoxication and the extenuat- ing circumstances were urged against the infliction of the death penalty. Late Thursday afternoon Governor Campbell respited Isaac Smith, who was to have been hanged in the penitentiary last night This is tbe eighth timo Smith has been respited since his con- viction. The evidence which convicted him was entirely circumstantial and there grave doubt of his guilt Wild Panic Among Cremation. LONDON. Dec. Hotel at Margate was destroyed by fire at a late hour Wednesday night. So sudden was the alarm that the holol attendants had barely timo to run through 'he corri- dors, knocking at the guests' rooms to awaken them. For a time a panic seemed inevitable, as the inmates, sud- denly aroused from slumber and clad in their nipht clothes, dashed open the doors of tneir apartments and rushed into the smoke-tilled passage ways. In the darkness and smoke men, women and children groped and fought their way to the main corridor of the burning building. Here some sort of order was established, and soon the bewildered people were being safely led out There were many exciting scones im- mediately following the first ruih of inmates. In many instances men and women, some carrying children in thoir anna, were seen preparing to spring from the windows the moment tho fire should reach them. They were, how- ever, in every instance except one, suf- ficiently reassured by the firemen and on-lookers to prevent their making tho fatal jump. A number of women fainted in tho crush and wore carried out by tho firemen and volunteers. A bar-maid who jumped from a lower window was the only person injured. Keccut in Kr.vns. AS FSCOM An Ktinch Artli-u Thirtv-llvf V. Oiir rMiir-s t> in: OKA r -DM in at .-rt-rN After are ASlvLJ> TO KiLSiGN. the YORK, Dec. a meeting of tbe Rio Grande Western Railroad Com- pany's directors yesterday the aVohllelT de- entered into by tbe railroad presi- ,c and it would be ients at J' Morgan's house was recognize the urg- ratified. Tbe Western Pa- .cjf.c Rail-way Company s directors have a." also ratiSr-d the presidents' a-r'-ement. VMJ "if. "ast fire was in tbe factory building of the Banderob F-nsitur'- zany's works aal ;3 t'-.e S65.000: hoK- dred men are thrown out of employ- ment and :t i5 tbat tbe works be here- All the roads which attended the meet- tbe agreement as soon as tbeir directors meci. S'lk Tnr NFTSV Y'IRK. Dec. Wen- Rotker. silk manufacturers at Point, have jadgaeat for in faror of Wiiiiaw Open- beina's Sons, importers of this city, who have tbeir commission mcrcbantg. It ia said that the liabilities are about and nonriaal assets ia excess of tbat aroonnt. CTTT. Idaho. Dec. SJOTI o? tbe GOT- of Worfc, emor George Scotspc, W. J. McCoa- Mass., aell and Fred T. Dubois elected five-story brick sboe manufactory be- UnJted States Senators accord to aa loajring to Carrier 4b Son was bvraed agreeoient entered iato Wednesday jesterdaj and tbe contests either night Sbocpe's will end March 4, bnnwd or rained by Tbe total 1S91. March 4, 1393. j loss Is aiOTtly insured. Five Dubois gets tbo foil term of BIT yean j hundred Trsrsoas temporarily fton Marcb 4. prived of mnplojaMnt tj tbe fire. protest the IL YOHK, Dec. Aprotest against the Conger lard bill was adopted by the Produce Exchange yesterday and to the United States Senate. The pro- test states that the members of the ex- change are opposed to taxing a legiti- mate industry for the benefit of another. The document recommands the passage of the Paddock pure food bill. City Official Indicted. NEW YORK, Dec. 19. Mayor Gleason, of Long Island City, pleaded not guilty in the Queens County Court to an indict- ment accusing him of being interested in the pool recently opened in Long Island City. Gleason't counsel demurred to the indictment, but tbe motion was overruled. Another Biff Fall are. PROVIDENCE, R. L, Dec. Ower Bros., agents of the Atlantic mills, have made an assignment The liabilities are large, but the mills will continue to run is usual The assignee refuses to give figures. The amount which is no loabt about 000, is confined to a few ireditors who will be able to stand the loss. _ Dactardlj Crime WKLLAXD, Ont, Dec. 19. Arthur Hoyt Day, who murdered his wife by- pushing her over a cliff at Niagara Falls in July last, was Thursday morning. The condemned man walked to the scaffold firmly and with a smile on bis face. His death was easy. Day bad committed bigamy under tbe name of Arthur Hoyt. and bis vcond wife having discovered bis real name, it be- came for him to decide be- tween the two women. He elected to live with bis bigamons wife and to dis- pose of the life of bis first partner. Prangfct Xllliom In GoKl. Xrw Yomt, Dec. Tbe White Star steamship Majestic arrived here Thurs- day from Liverpool. She brought ser- tail lion dollars ia gold to New York bankers, over 1.300 and J.OjO of mail. antnber of yersand bags of mail are unusually large for this seaaoa of tbe year. of n HurvoKter rnuipxuy Find Themselves Out of H Job llarxuse or the Formation of A Trust. FORT DOBOK, la., Dec. 19. Every local agent of tho Champion Harvester Company in this territory has boon re- quested by the company to forward his resignation at once. The reason given for this wholesale decapitation is that tho American Harvester Company, the new trust, will hereafter transact all the business of the company. To some of the older and most trusted agents, it was intimated that the trust might offer them situations shortly. As this course will be followed by other companies of tho combine, hundreds of mon will thus find tbemselvesout of a situation in this territory. _ ______ GRIEVANCES DISCUSSED At Joint Meeting of loiilanit TERTIE) HAUTE, Ind., Dec. A joint meeting of coal miners and operators of the State was held here Wednesday to discuss grievances. Tbe mooting com- posed of committees from tho miners and from the operators, each committee bo- ing composed of seven members. There were a number of grievances to be con- sidered and the session lasted until a late hour. Tho board decided that the miners at Clinton should have extra pay for working in mines which contained water. In most of tho other cases the board decided that it had no jurisdiction. A SmroMlle Trne CrltlcUm. ST. PETKRSBUKO, Doc. 19. The Novoye Vromina publishes an article attributing to tbe agitation in London in behalf of tbe Jews in Russia, tho de- cline in Russian securities and currency. The article contains this sarcasm: "Tho concern evinced by Englishmen who beggared India and Egypt, poisoned China with opium, destroyed like dan- gerous insects natives of Australia, and who under the pretext of abolishing tbe slave trade, are exterminating in a bar- barous fashion the African race, is cer- tainly touching." _ Hookmakur Conrlcted. ET.IZABKTH. N. J., Dec. Book- maker George Johnson has been con- victed in the Union County Court of un- lawful pool selling, tbe jury being only half an hour. A struck jury was drawn yesterday to re-try tbe indict- ment against tbe Jfew Jorsey Jockey Club, as to which thoro was failure to convict in October. Why SflUreralcofr Wat Killed. PAUIS, Dec. 19. The Echo publishes a statement alleged to have been made by Podlowski a few days after the mur- der of the Russian police agent, General Seliverskoff. Podlewski, in this state- ment, says that Soliverskoff was killed by him because he was plotting with the Russian police to capture Nihilists. for Pnnmircx. Dec. "Sir William" Beisley has sued his nepbow, Eck llois- in the common pleas court for for tbe assault upon him tho other day in the Wick block. "Sir William" is represented legally by Jesse McMath and the petition that was filed Thurs- day morning is quits a pathetic one. Kmroed Ten Mlllloai In Year. BOSTON, Mass., Dec. The Thom- son-Houston Electric Company has sold since last February worth of securities, and its net earnings this year, its net cash income from its sale of common stock, preferred stock and bonds, should be the large sum of SlO.- 000.000. _ Aoitgn. KF.OKI-K, la., Dec. Collus, Robert- son Hambleton. who gave a mortgage on tbeir grocery stock and bnilding a few days ago. have made an assignment. The schedule of liabilities amounts to a little over As- sets less than one-half of this anxxint. Wtim Deci Tbcrvia second day of tbe skating contest. The spin of tbroe for ;be of Holland, was by tbe American ftkater, Joe Donogbne, it minutes and Mrmteea common enough MI roal hTe wnoro prac- tically tho "-auio circum- stances e.vist :i< the climax of Ten- nyson'i poem, but sel- dom rtoi's I'ouie ;i c.iso to notice which is so similar :is ono that has just been developed at Lancaster, a town twenty mile-: south of Columbus. Thirty-five voars Timothy Miller married a woman of this town and five yours later moved with bis family of wife and two children to Kan- sas. Soon aftor arriving thero Miller disappeared, and, not returning, the de- serted wife and mado their back to friomls in Ohio. Years anil in oo'iiinj; from Millor tho wife believed ho had fallen a victim of bordur rultUinisrn. and married a man namei '.Vino- garner, with wliuin slid b_s li% foi over twenty VMM. ctiiM'-OT who wore youny when thoir f-r'vr Disap- peared had long- him, and so had about every OHO else Thero is a roviv.il in at one of the Lancaster now. and in ttio congregation th" rt.hor evening was a stranger, a uray-hoM-deil old man. When all Ind their "experience" ho arose to give his. other things, bo saul ho had converted in that cluiroh years ago. After services thov crowded around to know who ho was, a-.d srreat was their astonishment when ho told thorn that he was Timothy Miller. Ho had come back to sen his chiUlron, ho said. That same nitrht ho as ously as he had como, tolling no why he had deserted his family nor where ho had gone. FATALLY An Old imil Onr of Thori'to -i Lit "J JAPKSOX, Doc. 10. few evenings' since at JI alien's a fow milos south of hurc, ai scmin young poople were returning hoiui- from church an al- tercation took place bo'woon William Jenkins and Sluvins. 7 ''ns had before had a quam-l with a young man named Dover and Slaving, who is a half brother of Dover, renewed the quarrol with After to fight, Jenkins rushod at Slnvins and stabbed him from behind. The left lung was pioroud. Slavins will not re- cover. Jenkins Is in jail awaiting the of tho affray. A Iilinlnntive Kill. WASIIINOTOV C. H., O., Dec. Per- haps ono of tho smallest babios, for its age, that over lived has just died in this city, it being the child of Wad Under- wood, a worthless character now serv- ing out a year's aontence in tho Cincin- nati worlthons-. The little thing was over a yoar old. When It was eight months old it weighed but three pounds and never weighed more than five. Its fingers resembled birds' claws, and the palms of its hmcls were about tho sizo of ppstago stamps. Appoiiitu i i.Ulrlct Altornny. Dec. Colonel A. T. Brinsmade, City Solicitor, was yostor- day nominated by President Harrison to be District Attorney for the Northern district of Ohio. The nomination causes general satisfaction in this city, whoro Mr. Brinsmarto is favorably known as one of theablost political workers in his party, besides having an honorable war record. There were a number of appli- cants for tho position, which was made vacant by tho deart of Mr. Alexander. Oalr tjuitrH R BCFFATJO, N. Y.. Dec. Ed Gor- man, tbe Buffalo light- weight, knocked oat the anknowa of Robert Wright, of Detroit, ia four rounds at Irving Wed- nesday nigbt. Tbe conditions of tbe battle were Qoeonsbfrry rules, two- ounce gloves, Sl.OOO a side. Whank Pa., Dec. John M. Shank, a prominent farmer and grain dealer of Warrior's Mark, this county, baa made an assignment for tbe benefit of bis creditors Liabilities, UMM, -t North Am he rut. NORTH AMIIKRHT. Doc. 10. A burglary was committed Wednesday nigbt in tho, store of J. C. Uolzhour. Goods consist- ing of jewelry, silk handkerchiefs florostotbe amount of were stolen. No clew to the thieves. A. Baker'9 clothing store wa? broken into a.nd about worth of fura and stolen. ____ With Brer GISM. ATHKXS, O., Dec. John Rose, aged twenty-four, an Athens saloonist, struck Leo Davis, twenty-one, also of Athens, on the head with a Dec- jfloag during a in tho saloon day night, killing him. Rose is in jaiL Coffin i, amused CisrisxATi. Dec. The coffin works at Richmond and Carr streets was damaged yesterday to thjO extent of SJO.OOO; covered by iniiirance. Tbo damage to the building is not maro than _ Ohio Appolaterf. Dec. 19. Provident Harrison y.slx-rday sent to the Sonata for confirmation the names of fol- lowing Ohiyans to be O. W. Darling, Wellston; C. It Kisnbill, Medina. _ Fire for Coi.rvisrs O.. Dec. C. E. Spring. an ex-insurance agent and who came here from Virginia about fire ago, has been sent to the r.-initea- tiary for five years tor horse stealing. American Monetary Dec. The recom- mendations of the Pan-American for the meeting of aa al monetary commission having been adopted by all of tbe American repub- lics, President Harrison bas issued an Invitation for the first meeting of American Monetary Union at W ashivf ton January 7, 1S9L been received from nearly ail tbe kan republics announcing that would be represented by fall is   

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Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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