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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: December 15, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - December 15, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II, NO. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15. 1890. TWO CENTS. By the Ravages of Fire at PTOT- idence, K. 1. A Magnificent Business Block and Its Contents Completely De- stroyed. Occnpantu Bad to With Their Llvm, WbiU Two Wore Injured bj Falling PROVIDENCE, R. L, Dec. be- fore o'clock Saturday afternoon a rash boy employed by the J. B. Barnabj Clothing Company, corner of Westmin- ster and Dorrance streets, saw smoke issuing from the cellar. He investigated and came rushing: up the stairs, ex- claiming that the whole house was on fire. In a few minutes flames burst from the floor on the first story in every direction. Even the occupants of the first floor had to hurry in order to es- cape with lives, so quickly did the fire spread. Three alarms were sounded in quick succession and the flames mounted upward with such rapidity that the occupants of the second and third floors had barely time to reach the fire escapes. Women clerks in the cloak department and customers stood at the windows paralyzed with fright, but they were encouraged and hurried out by the firemen. The fire was so fierce that a fourth alarm was sounded, as it was rapidly communicating with adjoining buildings. The Barnaby company employed 100 persons in the building, some of them women in the cloak department on the second floor and the cutting rooms on the fourth floor. Alderman Henry B. Winship, the head of the -firm, was in the private office and endeavored to pre- vent a panic while assisting clerks and customers to make their exit in the quickest manner possible. A fire es- cape had been put on the Middle street side of tha building a weok ago, and but for this device nfany lives would have be'en sacrificed. In thirty minutes after the 'discovery of the blaze, the entire fire force of the city- was fighting the flames and offers of aid from Pawtucket and Johnston had been accepted. On the west of the Dorrance .building was the smaller H. T. -Root building with freestone front, and its roof-was twenty feet lower than the Dorrance building. This wall projecting above the Root building was the first to fall and it crashed in the roof of the Root building, wrecking the workshop of the Plymouth Rock Pants Company, in the upper story. The roof of the Dorrance building fell in soon a'fter and as floor after floor gave way it was seen that the long east wall, fronting on Dorrance street, was likely to fall. One hook and ladder truck was taken out of danger and down Westmin- ster street just in time. Truck No. 2, however, could not bo taken out and the wall fell into the street with a thunder- ous crash, smashing the truck into inch bits. Orrin -Mowrey, a member of truck No. a, and an unknown man were struck by the falling wall. Mowzey.'s right leg was broken and he was injured in the head and chest The unknown maabad a scalp wound. Soon after four o'clock the fire was under' control and it was then evident that it would be confined to the Dor- ranee building. The losses and insur- ance are: Building, loss insur- ance J. B. Barnaby Co., loss insurance i Taylor, loss insurance Clarke, loss insurance S900.. The H. T. Root building was damaged to the extent of by the crushing of the roof and by water; insured. Federation of Labor Conrentlen DETKOIT, Doc. Saturday's ses- sion of the Federation "of Labor conven- tion the report of the yotnmittee on boy- cotts and labels was received. Tbe boy- cott against Fleischman Co., yeast manufacturers, was affirmed. That j against certain Pittsburgh theaters was disapproved ot The boycott on the St. Louis breweries was also continued. After a short open meeting in which the new officers made speeches the convention adjourned sine die. A Bane Kail Deal Settled- NEW YORK. Dec. conference Saturday between Messrs. Tburtnan, Frazer and Barnie resulted in a satis- factory settlement of the Syracuse and Rochester matter. Syracuse will retire j and enter some minor league, and Roch- ester will take tbe same action. Boston and Chicago will then be elected to membership in the American Associa- tion. Tbe financial part of the settle- ment -was not made public- WAR OP THK FACTIONS. Stormy Meeting of at Tip. perarjr, With inr 1'Aruell Oppo- TIPPERARY, Dec. The meeting held here Sunday to issues now before the people, was attended by about -2.000 persons. Messrs. Healy and Sexton, who had boen expected to speak, telegraphed their the latter on account of illness. Mr. Davitt telegraphed that he was unable to leave Kilkenny, where, Ue said, the fate of home rule depended on the struggle. The meeting was a disorderly one from the start, the trouble beginning when Canon Cahill took the chair. The Par- nellites made an uproar and the confu- sion was so groat that the attempts at speaking could not be heard. A body of men armod with stout sticks sudden- ly raided the platform and drove away the chairman and leaders of the meet- ing, but befuro they could reorganize the meeting the opposing faction rallied and recapturpr! platform, driving the roughs off the scene. After order hadbeeu restored, resolutions support- ing the McCarthy party were adopted. Kn.KKN.NY. 15-0. Messrs. llealy, M. J. Kennv. Tanner and Davitt ad- dressed meetinss Sunday in support of Sir John Henuossy. Healy declared that if Parneli w.w allowed to return to the leadership, he (Healy) would stump Ireland with a new banner made of Mrs. O'Shea's petticoats. He said that Parneli had put Captain O'Shea in Parliament in exchange for his wife's honor. There was a stormy Nationalist convention at Kewry. Mr. Parneli was vehemently assailed and Mr. Huntly McCarthy was called upon to resign his In Parliament for Newry on the ground of his loaning toward ParnelL Mr. Paraell and some of bis adherents went to Tullyrono Sunday and attended a meeting there. Mr. Parneli made a speech which was a brief repetition of his former addresses at other points. The audience was with him, and the names of Healy and Hennessy were greeted with profound derision. Mr. Parneli afterwards addressed a meeting at Freshfore. He was quits violent, and referred to the decoders as miserable guttersnipes who had been dragged from obscurity by himself. HIGH UOJLLKK'S SUICIDE. An Etnbeizliog B Puti End to Ufe l.if-i Aftrr iiu-.n; Kxpoaed. MILWAUKEE, Dec. One of the firm of P. A. Gross Co.. wholesale milliners, while dining at a restaurant on Friday night last, was surprised to see their book-keeper, Emil Wulff, drinking champagne at one of the tables. As Wu4ff s salary did not warrant such luxuries, an investigation of nis ac- counts was begun Saturday, and soon after a shortage of was discovered. Wulff said he could easily explain the discrepancy and went out to hunt up one of the customers. Nothing more waslieard of Wulff until Sunday morn- Ing, when he was found dead in an out- house at his boarding house with a bul- let in bis right temple and the 'revolver blenched in his hand. The total short- age will reach S3, 000. Hundred Dftathi From Small- SAX FRANCISCO, Dec. Among the arrivals on tbe steamer San Juan Satur- day was Joseph McMuliin, a newspaper man from New York. The republic of Guatemala, he said, is besieged by small-pox. In seven weeks there were deaths throughout the country and the death rate at last accounts Was oa 'the increase. Few sanitary precau- tions were taken when the disease first appeared and the result was that the peo- ple have been mowed down by tbe hun- dreds. Tbo hospitals are crowded and the physicians are not numerous enough to attend all tbe cases. A Tragedy. ST. Loris, Dec. 13. Henry Hartman, a saloon-keeper, while standing on a rear porch of bis house at t'iroe o'clock Sunday morning, wa-5 auJ instanrty killed. The critno is enshroudr-d in mystery. A hours after the tragedy the police arrested Hartman's two sons, Joseph and Honry, Jr. Later John Brenner was arrested and a revolver found in his possession. Hartman has been living vary unhappily with his family and his suddoa taking ofT is as- cribed to domestic trouble. A Tranp. BAixraonE. Dec. W. P. Ashley, of the St. Louis Republic, arrived hers Saturday. On Monday last Colonel j Jones, of the Republic, bet SI. 000 with Mr. Busch. the millionaire brewer, that j Ashley could beat his way from 8t 1 Louis to Baltimore within a week. in? provided with only fire dollars. Ashley arrived two days ahead of the Allotted time, but very rocky in appear- ance. j Cablet- Arrested. PHILADELPHIA. Dec. James S. an, wbowas.casbier of tae broken of America, and woo is chareed witb offences similar to those charged I Work, Pfeiffer and MacFarlaae, arrested Saturday at Newcastle, DeL Dpncan consented to cosie to this city j without a requfsitioc, and on his arrival i acre was locked op im default of 1 bt.il. Gone of End4 In BALTIMORE. Dec. J 5. Johnaom, barber, stabbed to death Saturday aitrht by John Wasbinftoa la a salooa. Tbe two tnea were ihrowiaf dice, and the murder was ihe rvnlt fan over tbe from m Third-Story Window. ST. Louis, Dec. Fire in tbe build- ing at the northeast corner of Eighth and Marion streets at an early hour Sunday morning- caused Lizzie and Kate Koch and Heinrich Schultz to jump from a third-story window to the ground. The two girls were not badly hurt, bnt Schultz was so severely injured that died in the afternoon. The damage done by the fire was slight Solclttftd la NEW YORK. Dec. The Trave arrived Sunday after a. very rough passage from Brernen. Among ber second cabin was Mrs. Ida Oelring. twenty-seven years old. whose husband lives either at Chicago or Green Kay. Oa Dicember 12 the woman was missed. It is supposed she committed suicide by jumping orer- board- _ "Will fmsn Kf.tft WAsmsfiTo.r. 15. Cabinet on Saturday considered the financial condition of the country, and as a result tbe President -xiil send a message to Congress this week suggesting as measure of relief eoacimeat of legislation for iae issue of additional currency based oa iScrcased purchases An Exciting He ports from the tile Sioux. General Carr Ordered to Arrest Short Bull and His Band, Wno to Surrender. Additional Seat to of In Arizona KUI Two Ranchmen. RAPID CITY, D., Dec. battery of Hotohkiss puns was sent yesterday from Fort Meade to this point to rein- force General Carr's command at the mouth of Rapid creek. A number oJ straggling parties of Indians have been seen jroing- north. They are under com- mand of Short Bull and Kicking Bear, they will not surrender. Short Bull is one of the worst Indiana on the reservation. It was he who murdered Acrent Appleton in cold blood at Pine Ridge. It is expected the main body of hostiles will attempt to follow him. General Carr has orders to intercent and disarm these Indians at all hazards, and it is expected a collision will occur to-day in the vicinity of the mouth of Spring creek or Rapid creek. Dr. Mc- Glllicuddy. Surg-eon General of the South Dakota militia, has been ordered to join Colonel Day's command at the front '-overal old Indian fighters have volunteered as guides and scouts. A company of Sioux and Crow scouts from the north are on the way to join General Carr. PD.-E RIDGE. N. D., Dec. I dians gent out by General Brooke to bring the hostiles in were roughly treated and their peace pipe shot into pieces. The Seventh and Ninth cavalry are preparing to start for the Bad Lands to-day to brintf the hostiles in. The Sixth and Eighth cavalry from the Black Hills are advancing on the west. CHICAGO. Dec. Miles, ac- companied by Captain Maus and the General's private secretary, left aere for St Paul last evening. Just before leaving the General said he would re- main at St Paul a couple of days and go thence to the nortawestern Indian country. TOMBSTONE, Ariz., Dec. tion is received here that two white men, Jack Bridges and Uurke Robin- son, were killed by Apaches in the Guadaloupe Mountains Friday. Bridges discovered some freshly killed meat and went to Hall's ranch to notify tho men there. Then, in company with Robin- son and another man, they wont to the place where the meat was found, to in- vestigate the matter. They had just arrived at the spot when they were fired upon by tbe Indians. They returned the fire and attempted to escape, but Were and two of them 8oon jfelL The other man escaped after be- ing grazed by "a b'ullet, which made a Slight scalp wound, and reported the re- sult. -A courier was then sent to this citj lor help. Sheriff Slaughter immedi- ately telegraphed to Fort Huachua for made immediate prepa- tations for departure. The fight took ttie Mexican line. Five In- aiatw were teen, but it was impossible to know were present, the fact that the party was surrounded shows that there were more than five there. Batcher Murdered. SAN Axxoxio, Tex., Doc. At noon yesterday Louis Evers, a butcher, called Robert Richter, also a butcher, to the door and as he appeared, blazed away at him with a pistoL Richter turned to run into the house and a second shot sent a bullet into his neck just at the base of tae brain. Richter fell dead in his doorway. Evers started down tbe street and entered tho first saloon, where be placed tbe muzzle of the re- volver to bis forehead and pulled tho trigger, but the weapon failed to go off. Evers was arrested and locked up. Killed and Injured bj a Falling KntKviLLE, Mo.. Dec. Fire origi- nated in the Masonic Temple Saturday, destroying it and eight business houses', besides a number ot residences. Tne loss is 800. 000. While the people were removing their goods the walls of the Masonic Temple fell in. burying s num- ber of persons in the ruins. William Sbeeps, John Price and Fred Weeks were rescued in a badly burned condi- tion. All have limbs fractured. Mrs. Bunker was taken out unconscious and her injuries are believed to be fataL Volaey Hart was taken out dead. to Hold NEW Dec. Jack Demp- sey, the pugilist, arrived in this cftj yesterday. Dempsey says he bears that Fitzsimmons is a wonder, but expects to bold bis own. Many thousands of dol- lars have already been wagered opoa tbe result of tbe Prominent auat! Firm scijfSATj. Dec. 15. -A petition for the lor a receiver for Ktll, vt Co., dr- goods was Sled Saturday. Liabilities as- sets tightness of the money market forced tae embarrassed firm to tbe walL 15u-A Sre wbick destroyed eigbt bouses at Mia- dea, Xeb., Sawjrdaj it, force wica 54 reached tbe Jansea a solid brick strwrlore. The total loss p.nn, Pa., Dec. A in wticb affected .boat twenty occurred Satsrfay in tb? niae. operated by the Delaware A son Coal Company. It is sot j bow serious tbe workisg of tbe I will be affected by the eatt-im. J y. J.. Clark this dty will wbea will go to wo te.dmtWal.Bley will be op- corUiML A VALUABLE FIND. _ Flow Gas Struck at Junction of the Allegheny and Moaoa- fahela Rivers. .PiTTSBUKGH, Deo, one of tha attractions, the management of the Pittsburgh Exposition Society con- tracted with the "Pittsburgh Oil Well Supply Company to drill an oil well upon the Exposition grounds during the recent exhibition. Drilling was com- menced early in September and pro- gressed with varying regularity until last Saturday the drill penetrated the third sand at a depth of feet and proceedings were brought to a sudden by a terrific flow of natural gas. The location of the well is at tbe junc- tion of the Allegheny and rivers. During tbe day while prepara- tions for confining the unexpected flow of gas were in progress, the natural fuel belched forth with so great a noise that conversation within a block of the well was almost impossible. Tho gas was controlled in the evening and a guajre taken. The flow showed a pressure of 400 pounds to the inch. This quuir-lty of is sufficient to sup- ply fifty puddling- furnaces of the larg- est size. Tue  liabilities are 000, with .US-MS to Amount. Tho blac 01 t'.ir isle Manufacturing C mipany C Pa., wore burned tho oohor 1 ty Loss fully injured. A numbor of men will bo thrown out uf work tem- porarily. .Many nicmVrsof opposed to Parneli are ali-eddy in st'.-ioin pecuni- ary embarrassment- It, U IM ported that two of tlmji havu ili -J to, and re- cuivod temporary from Mr. Qhidstono. C. S. Sloujrhton, cf Now York, was ar- rested at luduiuapul--, rci-.-mtly by a United States Doputv M and taken to New York, c larc-il .v'ilti swind- ling a Mrs. Joitui- out of jl.O'JO in a pen- sion transaction. Adolph Stui-ling, twenty-two, formerly a student at Point, shot himself recently at bis 'riO'ije in Jamaica, L. I. There ia a po-taii.u of his recovery. His fatlior c.h-jt and killed himself in tbo same luusc some time ago. Attorney (i.-nioral has returned to the Prosidont tlio y.p.jM in tho caao of tbo World's Fair. .1' fouad tiuit all the legal requlrumou of bad been lioiiiplioj with, i will now next in-juiro :is j t'i'j sutHcicnoy of tho financial unarm' At a reccuit I'biladelphia of those i-i 1110 Sioel Couipauy, wliicu conti'olii Ibo for making basic sooel, it was d ouiea r.o sell to outside tho rijbt to use the process upon tbe payment of a royalty of one dollar per ton. The Scotch railway have dwoided to go on sti-iUo npxc Sunday lor suorier hours." Tho prospect is that tho rail- ways will be tied up at the very titno when such an evont will be most exas- perating to tbe public, us tne Curistruas- week travel will bo nnurferpd vvitu. lion. John M. Fleming, a well-known. editorial writer in Tennessee, with. whom Congressman fholan had tbe brated controversy which ended by him sending tbe editor a challenge to fight u duel, is lying very ill at his hotel ir- Knoxville, Tonn., with poor chances Ol recovery. Ex-Congressman John A. Hiestam d.ied at Lancaster, Pa., recently, o paresis. Mr. Hiestard was a lawyot and had served as State Representative and State Senator. In 1871 he was made naval officer at tho pore of Philadelphia, which position he hold fur eight years. In 1884 be was elected to as a Republican and was ro-electod in 1830. THElIARKETS. j Flour, Cniln mid ProrUIon. NBW YORK. Dec 'id easy at 3 per cout. Tne highest niti: was t loweal W- Exchange closocl stcswly. Poin-tl rates 488. actual rates for si xiy dajs und 4SI lor demand. Oovurnmcnt bondo closi; I sfa iy. Currency Bs at 109; 4s, coupon, at 11'-': JijS iln lit 103. .vti, -Cymtry m.t'lp Minnesota rn'-'-iil at at ST> No. -J red at U7c, No. red ut We. No. 3 at .Vic. No 3 yel at.Vc. No a inl-frl aUXc No. white at Ko. 1 white- at ...-c BnTTEn- Fancv crcumo -v at dnfry at 3.'c. New York at inc. CJhlo Strictly :it Hulk n NKW YORK. St'-alv -in a ilcina.l Kliic grailos supcrllnr at It.iw city mill extras at 85.15 .15. M.iinosol.i cjttra at R! OT. Stron? No. M winter at cnflt, (Jo fJncsnibi-r ii'.il .IiTiary at t! No. 2 ui nt.Vic -ain do Dcc-jmbcr at 'tit. .it ''I'ic. Xo. i m xed ;i! M'ic cash, do at at tW.TTWim Jnnua-y .it Vi IT. K -hruary at Vl.33. creara'.Ty fanoy Wi s'.'irn flat nl Writcrn fresh at 27c. Doc. DccoiK'bor at 92.HC- Jannar? at D-cfltn'Kjr at J.innary at o. Dccem'wr at41'ic. January at i'-'c at JH ot l> :r at Juniary at May at Toi.r.to. n Active at >Sc, December 9Sc. at 57c.  l 9025i73i BTTTTAIXJ. Dec SHECP ASO Top fradi-t Cbo4cc to extra sJwep at dxrio- at to nrn at ana lower. Xeti! am. EAST Lranrrr. Dee. WCklaf an through tomstgam Ma. nilaJe'.ptiiav at tM. at 0 at   

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