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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 31, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               INDIAN FIGHTING. jiaior Russell's Lively with the Cheyennes. FACTS ABOUT HOSIERY. BRIGVT CHIT-CHAT. Co For; -MP.V i-tu-ifi! ITCed Men In Colorado tiro'-" Morgan Fort Good Story About Minister'! Alleged Nnrrow Ooape- "There was some Indian fighting in as 1 said M-ijor W. II. as he sat in the rotunda of the r House, to a Chicago Tribune re- no-ter. "i remember the Cheyer.nes raising Cain along the overland rousi-, attacking stages, plundfir- itions and mail bags, and chop- dn'ui telegraph wires. This was lor.'.do. between Fort Morgan and I went out with a cum- of sixty men to re-establish the o had just got bovond a place Moore's, a sort of station fur tho i-.ai'e line, and a stage came up as we '.v aftor a hard day's march. 'i'Li- Indians had been crawling around friii1.' to surprise us. but no Indian Ci-jiti-r is erer surprised, aijd I was n adv'or them. The men on the stage WITO for going on, but I said: 'I wouldn't if I wore you, for there's about sixty of those devils hiding among the sand-hills over jondor.' The stage- knew his business and wont back to .Moore'b. 1 told them 1 was going to ir.ari'h In the morning at five o'clock. There was a woman with herchildrcn in tbo stage, too, by the way. Tho men were indignant at turning back, but tho driver had the advantage. Well, next rooming about o'clock we saw tho behind us in the sand hills aud' out popped the Indians. Part of pot back and drove them off. Tho In- dian doesn't flght unless he has clearly the best of it from the start. Well, you ought to have seen the civilians that were so hot to go ahead the night be- fore. They were shaking hands with, everybody and crying and carrying on The woman with the children sat inside tno stage all the time, cool as a cucum- brr and never cheeped. "Well, we went on and found that the starve coming east from Denver on tho sttvngth of the report that 1 was going iu clear tho line and re-establish, the stations, putting two of my men at each place, had been attacked the driver and tho horses killed. The mail-bags had all been rifled and such envelopes as loolced as if they might have money in them wcro ripped open, i shall al- ways believe there was a renegade whito man among them. But there was no trace of any passongo-r killed. And now comes the funny part of the story. '-After we pot info camp again as 1 was smoking after supper a. long, lanky, muddy man co-me up and introduced himself as Mr. I forget his u-mc minister from Denver, and '.vanted to b HTOW a rifle so he could take the stage on East. Says be: that btagc tiat the Indians got yesterday.' I looked at him as much as to say: 'Tell that to a dog- robbfr.' lie saw I didn't take any stock in his story, and be said: '1 suppose you hArdly believe uia.' says I, "if you weren't a minister of the Gos- pel I -.huiild say yon were a dashed liar.' ho told mo his story. Lie was the only passenger, and it was a hot he had bis shoos and coat off and was dozing, 'bang'.' went a lot of guns and he kwkod out and saw a croud of Indians whooping and digging out for the stage coach. He saw the driver ktel over, shot through the head, 'and the- horses swerve from tho road off on to the prairie. His first impulse was tho lini'S p.nd fctc'.i the horses had: into the road, and he believed be could boat tho Indiins in a race. So he ciirMX'd out of the window arid got upon the box, but the Hr.es had dropped on the ir round find the four hordes jtibt more than streaking it. lie climbed do.-.n un thi! polo to puk up ibe lines, >lic Indians popping .iway at him all i.ie and juc-t ta< n t'u  a-e in.portod from Kngiacd and fine silks from France C'ier- many produces a line of hosiery goods from the cheap to the medium. Mure of the artielt s of German manufacture .ire used in i'..is country th.in other kind. In the United States lisle threads, cottons, wools, a f.iir grade of cashmeres and some very good silks are produced for consumption. Jn the suburbs of Philadelphia, and in that city, also, the making uf domestic hosiery always r.ud is to-day a important industrv. New Hampshire is another u.e knit cotton goods of Massachusetts aro known in (.-very section of this country for In Indian.! a fine grade of men's woolen socks is made. The inaiuifa.-tur.-1 of the silk goods is confined to the East, and as a matter of fict thf do mi -uc mills aro scattered all over tho country. Two vears ago a hosiery plant was established ir Khode Island by a of Englishmen who brought the machinery and the skilled workmen to this country. There is con- siderable demand for the American- made silk good-, they are cheaper in price than the imported ar- ticle, iiut tue sale of silk goods is limit- ed. This much may bo said in. favor of our stocking industry; our cotton and woolen goods aro improving in quality every year and it will not be long before they arc fully equal in every respect to tho foreign hosiery. Cottons aro largely worn now. There seems to be a decreasing demand for woolen goods. This trade is one of the most important branches of the dry-goods tralHc, because everybody must cover his or her feet, even if unable to buy Alexander kids or sealskin sacques. A cotton stocking cuts a very unimportant figure in a. financial sense, albeit it is decidedly comfortable when the air is chilly. It may be an intorosting item to know, says the Chicago Post, that one of tho largest importers of German hosiery in the world is the leading dry-goods es- tablishment of Chicago. try :it his command the expense does not worry liim. VERY DISHEARTENING. What Your Sweetheart Eat In tht -.vnr from 1 was pn.-tty inUj in a I tell go-'kn swimmer and the. watt-r I was r.f.ir nil tbo iiiTis 1 looked wf-st- i. too. and tst-re were two men coiainj dovra t'ne river bank a> if cut me off. F.ut I ny r.nd I wasn't r-iing '.bo side and was heard somo- I '.r.r'j hol- out ih'-ro :n 1 Sweetheart Courgn of llttr Hxistenic. A cynical doctor, withal a man of wonderful resources and a quick mind, lives on one of the avenues on the South side, says the Chicago Tribune. He was in his study a few nights ago when a young man came in and began ques- tioning him about bis (the young man's) propriety of marrying. Tho young man foolishly raved orer bis sweet- heart and called her angelic and so on. lie was afraid that she was tco fragile for this world. The old doctor grunted. "Fragile, ho asked. "How fragile? Ever test her fragility? Let rao give you some figures about her and woman- kind in general, showing how fragile they are. Let us suppose that this piece of perfection is in moderately good health. She will live to be, say, sixty years old. Women don't like to die any more than men do not as much for never grow old, you know. Listen to me- She will eat one pound of beef, mutton, or some other flesh every day. That's 805 pounds of meat in a year. In years it's 21.900 pounds. How's that for fragile? "She will eat as much bread and as much vegetables per diem, and there you liave in oixty years poucds of bread and meat. If she is not too an- gelic she. will drink daily no less than two quarts of coffee, tea. or water. And by the time she is ready to have a monu- ment she, will have consumed 175 bogs- heads of liquids. Fragile? Now, young man, these fiyim s do not include the forty or fifty lambs she will worry down with mint sauce. It docs not take into consideration the spring the 000 pounds of butter, the eggs and the four hogsheads of sugar she will consume in years. U doesn't lake. into consideration her KC: crciiin, Iicr ovfeters. clams and such All this means about 4o tons, or as much as you could in half of Sibiey's ware- loif-o. Fragile? Think of your afHnity n connection with tlic-.f figi.rf s and then her being fragile. Young uan, you are a fool. LAZINESS DOESN'T PAY. The One Secret of Stlrce-n I n tiring trouble and In life, too. otic secret of success Is found in activity, says tbo Somerville Journal. "Not a day a was lii'.' mo! of a ono of the grandest men our civilization has knc-'.-.Ti. Kight ti gr'-atcst of Grecian orators c--ry :h" history of pc-rfc-ct in that prcat stvle. in th'j foundations of h'is rr'-.v: -ising ii'.lif bits Jf.-'.ro "bleb to couM -it w.rkir.j a.-- a. r-nnf-r's Kirkc V.'f.iT" Gr'- frorr. his to i TSENG, tho late illustrious' Chinese statesman, has receded tho i highest posthumous honors which tho j Celestial Kingdom can in a i formal decree of the Emperor that be "forgives hiui all his sins and crimes committed during bis life." Miss OATHS is the richest unmarried woman in Buffalo. Miss Gates, by good business management, has added very considerably to tho one million dollars left to her by her father, atone time president of the Western New York Pennsylvania railroad. "BUFFALO I'II.L" CODY continues to draw big crowds of spectators to his show in Europe, and in some places tho performances of his cowboys and Indian "braves" excited such general interest that the children on the streets gave up their wonted games to make mimic at- tacks on perambulators in lieu of stage coaches, -and to lasso one another in true "Wild West" style. "M.M'K TWAIN" has made the discov- ery that, whereas lecturers always af- fect to bave a sober end in view, which can be reached by sugar-coating their bolus of ripe thought with a paste of illustrative anecdotes, their real aim is to tell as many good stories as they have time to narrate, letting the pro- fessed subject-matter of the address serve merely as a thread on which to string them. LOUD AKTHUK CECIL, half brother of tho Marquis of Salisbury, was in his youth a man of extraordinary strength. lie was one day walking through a Held on his farm at Innerleicben when a young bull rushed at him. Instead of running Lord Arthur seized the animal' by his horns and pushed him hack, wriggling and struggling, inch by Inch, till he got him into his stall, where ho left him cowering and trembling all over. HEATHY CLEWS, tho banker, says tbat shaving tho bead for baldness Is a delu- sion and a snare. When quite a younsr man ho found himself growing bald, and by the advice of a barber, which advice also indorsed by a wigmaker, ho bad the top of bis head shaved regularly twice a week for six months. During this time ho wore a thirty-dollar toupee bought of tho wigmaker. Six months was the time he .was to share his head to effect a cure, but at the expiration of this period ho found that tho toupee or something olso had killed all tho roots of his hair and he was hopelessly bald. JoiiL JjEN'TOK gives important infor- mation to persons who expect to kiss the Queen or to be kissed by her Majes- ty. "Persons of high writes Mr. Tenton, "especially the ladies, have the privilege of being klssod by the Queen. Other ladies make a low cour- tesy and kiss the Queen'sband, which she places in the palm of their hand. If tho Queen condescends to kiss an untitled person this person must not expect to return a kiss in kind, but must only kiss her hand. Of course, a lady before reaching the Queen must bave berrigh; hand ungloved." In addition to this is is also while for Americans to know that according to tho best eti- quette they do not have 10 kiss tbo Queen's hand unless they want to. SOMETHING RARE IN STATUARY. surroaaa 50 tbey Weil, hfe rifle I iho-gh cit." _ Ji ie chief religions of the to ifce a-lnerc-TJt? Christianity, Wo.000; Confccianiszi. ooo.OOO: Fetichism. Ba Spirit COO; SbintoJsss, Jevs, WO; Parsers, VoUl, Xo CompaUlon Aftnat It. WASIIINT, rox, Oct Roosevelt said Thursday that Govern- ment clerks had a perfect right to con- tribute money to whichever party they preferred, without fear or favor, but they could not be compelled to contrib- ute. ''There is no he said, "why under a Republican administra- tion all the contributions should be made to the Republican campaign fund, and undor a Democratic administration they should all be to the Democratic New York's MHMUUO School ami Homo. NEW YUIIK. Oct. board of trustees of the asylum fund of F. A. M., after a three days' session have ac- cepted tho bid of Dickison Allen, of Syracuse, X. Y.. at for the con- struction of tho Masonic homo and school at Utica, upon tho beautiful park on tin- confines of that city which is tho property of the fraternity of tho State of XL-W York. It will accommodate about 150 persons, firound will bo bro- ken at once for tho erection of the build- ing. ________________ Forbidden to Strike. Ciue.vno, Oct. will bo no strike by tho Brotherhood of Telegra- phers at present. Grand Master John- son, of Louisville, has issued an order that all members of the order must re- main at work. Those who went on strike at St. Paul and other cities are Commanded to return to their employ- ment, and those who have boon dis- charg-od for their connection with tho organixatibn are urged to regain, if pos- sible, their situation with the company. Man unit AVtfe bj OM. Oct. Mottling ana wife, who on Wednesday took up their Abode in boarding bouse of Ralph jates on Ellis avenue, wero found dead bed Thursday morning. They had eon Asphyxiated by gas. Whether or ot the was one of suicide has not ot bion determined. Their Ninth Annual Convention. BUFFALO. N. Y.. Oct. Tho ninth nnual convention of tho Methodist Ipiscopal Women's Homo Missionary ociety of tho Unit'id States bogau 'hursday in the Ds'lnwaro avenue M. church, about 200 delegates being iu ttendunce. See Otxr Stock of Our Misses' all Solid Kid and Goat Shoes at >ur Child's Shoes, from 8 to 10 1-2, all Solid Kid and ft out. Plain Toe and Tip, at gl.OO! Extra High Cut Child's Fine Shoes H om 5 to 7 at 81.OO. ood Child's Spring ileei from 4 to 7 1-2, atOOeents. Fine Goods Sold CompsBrtilively Low! Repairing and Custom Work a Specialty. THUM'M KOENREICH, Main Salem. Ohio. Trotters Wilson, DEALERS IN ROCERIES calculitc- of ,j> 2.1 .-i jrair.-'.. :..ts c-.-. iriib AS opcr. ooox or while to rssf-'J bodily TO' Th" FrT.'ih a prorc-rb says. '7jy-T> by cc-es very Is -KC a. Sir Edward IlsJ-Jftr Lyiusn THE bronze of a woman and other objects of antiquity have been found at Heraclea. in 1'ontus. Tho treasures will he sent to tho Imperial Museum at TIIK Egyptian Departincatof Uio Ucr- lin Museum has recently acquired an Important stauc in wood of tho ancient Empire. It was found to thengbtof the railway between Modinet cl-Fayoum and Edwa. A sarcophagi! 5, with fine- sculp- tures in relief and columns as part of tho decoration, has been found in Sa- mo5, near 1'ouritais. Tho esua- vators at Uipylon, Attica, havo found a relief which apparently belonged to a grave. Iti.s about four feet high by two In width, and represents a woman in draprry wi th a T. aso in the right hand and the- left raised. COUNT Oiisi DI UKOOLIA has bf.-n traveling on tho Upper Ori- noco. lie found many rude carvings on in thia region. the grotto of Caicara aro rough carvings to imitate tho figure of the- South American or jaguar; tbo caves contained mummies which seemed to the Count to bear a close resemblance to thoso of particularly in the shape of tho skulls. THE corrici'tteo appointed to complete the decorations of the Pantheon. Paris, having b'-fore them t'nritu M. statue of Victor Il.igo. says the v.-'-re struck by ifeinf'-riori in st-lf. commonness of conception nnd triviality. This jud jmcnt v.-as ago by the more thoughtfu' critirs. who now M. or. the opportunity him of trrir.r The "Triumph of was intc-r.-i'.-d for choir of the }.as Lf-n f'.urid to of projroriion with th'- Tnn to Ko-jaon, the ol Till Tc-cV.-d Is bis In 1771 with iis sratcc of A flaTfi sr.an, Voltaire ia r Frascais. Prince H Keep constantly on hand ,he largest and best selected stock of Groceries.Provisions, 'onfectionery, Tobacco, gars, in the City. [.'here's Any virtue in long ad's, nd loud talk, other dealers must selling their goods at lower prices than us. But do they? Well, no 1 Not mi oh! We believe in making our an- nouncements brief, and to the )oint. If we have bargains we tell rou so without much talk. Here a few. They recommend them- selves. They need no lengthy de scription: 25 All-Wool Grey French anyway. Ail-Wool Red Blanket, arse size, is our leader. White R3.50 sellers. Laporte have the Delusive they are the All-Wool Grey Under- wear You can see them n AVest Iu East Window, the finest line of Furs, Capes, Etc., ever opened n Salem. 20c Curtain Poles. The Best Brands of Flour tn the Market c. 57 MAIN STREET. BUILDING- S1TJSS FOR SALE! A splendid oppoitunity is now offered to of luoderiite lueam to purchase beau- tiful s-iteb for homes, on East Mnin, Easl Grcou unil East Jligb htreets; and we s-bal try in all ca.ses to iidjnst payments tn it tho ability of tho buyer. For plat an" prices, call soon, at tho P.eal Estate office of A. J. KING, over Burford's. 53-7S Dressmaking Establishment, NO. 6 BROADWAY. Mrs. H. E. Hamilton. .Y Dr.r.ssMA.KF.R in City using th French and Tailor System of Cutting. Pat terns n Specialty. Perfect Fits and Bes Work Guaranteed. 73--J7 ASK YOUR GROCERS F01 "BUCKEYE" Full Roller ft I Flour. TAKE NO OTHER n b -AND- FRESH MEATS, 40 and 42 Broadway. Cl- Our Meat Market is complete in every detail. Trotters Wilson. DICKERSON S M'CALLA, tN----- STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, Best Grades of Flour, Selected Tons, Pnre Coffees find Spices, ft hoice selection of Butter and Cheese, choice Syrups nud Molusscs, Dried and Csiuued fruits iu variety. Also a complete nssort- jf goods nsnnlly found in a firat-clnss Gro- :ery. deliveretl free of charge. DICKERSON McCALLA, 40-65 NO. 32 BROADWAY. Wall Paper At 4c! CSTDuring this month, (Oct.) we will sell WALL PAPEU nt 4 and 5 cauls; and 13or- der ns low as 1 cent. Better grades lit half jrice, to close out. to uiako rooiu for other ;oods. Come ixud carry it lamp's Variety Store, Bd'y. 3ES. DENTIST. Office No. Main Street, over McMil- lan's Book Store, llosideuco, No. 280 Gosheu Avnnne. EHAYES.1 Remnants Ribbon on coun- ter to-morrow 50 each. You know how good colors are se- lected first, so try to be one of the first to select. Underwear aiul Hosiery sell this cold spell You know where to come 'tis evident especially when TSC is saved MAJOR COWAN, THE POPULAR In Gents' Kiinusliliig (iootH My work ami grxntsan-llrsu-l.uss In every respect, and alnajs up to the t lini's. 71 .Until SCrot'l, Vcnioii Hlork. Best Brands Flour, Canned Goods, in variety. Swee Choicest Tt'ii. Purest Spikes Freshest Cof- fees, (ground if you want Finest Jersey Sweet Potatoes, ftt Lease's Grocery and Provision Store, 25 E. MAIN ST., SALEM, O. on a 5oc Ladies' White Merino Vest. J n fact it's like finding that amount. Flannels kinds and kinds. Sorts and sorts, and prices that are emphatic. Blankets move steadily along. One particular drive. "The which sold last year at we place on our counters this season at a pair. Cotton Flannel The 12 yards for a Dollar will always be sought for. It is a super- ior fabric at the price. 6 yards for 5oc. Dollar Table Linen. Keep it before your mind. Remem- ber that Christmas is not two moons away, and if you want a cloth a hint well put to the head of the house sometimes counts. Napkins to match, a Doz. You may dream of Towels but never of the extra value we will be prepared to offer for our Holiday trade. Dress Stuffs Have you no- ticed the way the piles shrink on Dress Goods Counter? That tell's the tale of busy yard-sticks and of prices that speak intelligently. "Tribes Curtain Wires" Fer- ris' "Good Sense" Corset Waists. A lot of INFANTS All Wool Shirts. Open front White fine goods. 50 Scrim. C. I. HAYES, and Lnndy Stroele. e. r. RUKENBROO, PLAIN AND FANCY JOB PRINTER. ttlo< It, No. 25 Main Slrett, Salem, Ohio. Carpenters' Union Meets regnlnrly every Tuesday evening at in Harmony Hull, Mnin street. 3Ctf 9. H. GOT. Stc'y. 168 Ellsworth SI.. Is receiving a choice l'-t Family Groceries! All new and no oW rtock. also on linnd f-.II vzppl; of F. I. GILBERT, Specialty. jc Forge. NO. 1 5 DEPOT ST. gentlemen's FOR to ac trio Bora, do you tV- It's wcrt-k thai" Whether the or with the there's co iritboat work. Doa'i be iazj. fee Tt of Jean In the- M. dc lsiir.s that he forestalled (H e) Uatje la tbo an of exstlay ana was Tcscb more tho 4ispo- of TITA! Ho defends h'.TG frorr, charge of having a-.assod ricbes by sc.linj ootu mis portraits. Fresh and Salt Water Fish, Drewed and Lire Ponltey. s to any of the City- NO. 18 E. MAIN ST. w. in V) JMK! of that mv SL, HIIDULTIEITI IT WILL PAY YOU -WITH ROOT J IUWLEY. --------GEOCEE- 34 BROADWAY, TELEI'IIONE NO. JOO. SALEM, O. City Meat MarKet! J. OATSDEAN CO., ------Has opened------ MariJ'-t.at 1O2 
                            

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