Salem Daily News, October 31, 1890, Page 2

Salem Daily News

October 31, 1890

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Issue date: Friday, October 31, 1890

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Thursday, October 30, 1890

Next edition: Saturday, November 1, 1890

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Publication name: Salem Daily News

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Years available: 1889 - 1916

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All text in the Salem Daily News October 31, 1890, Page 2.

Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 31, 1890, Salem, Ohio I THE DAILY NEWS. EUROPE'S LABOR LAWS. JFJ.IDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1890. WSberuian Hate, at Atchisou Jt Son's. ZfFor a nice Sunday dinner, try Calln- Leave orders at tlie Notice to Advertisers. Advertiser" changes will faoili- I by bringing in the copy ou ti-. e'.- lug previous to the da} on which he ad-.i-rtihement is to appear. Please re- this. to M are COUtc CO'. iu i- dKtrict-j wlit.ro y cvf-'ily buliiiiced uu'l iu the -trict-, thfc election IB of interest this full and UIK Especially is thi-i tin': tho gerrymander was made with a vi.-w of i-hauging the delpgntinii in fr'ni Republican to Democratic. The Imon to defeat that In 'I .1- "I'M district the fight lias beuu the Lotto-t lor tho reason that McKinley is ku :i the uuthur uf the new tariff bill an! i. mule he propo'C-d to contest the iiel every appliance known to politi- cal i'..iuiJiiiguiug and hns been met on e.'fiv h'uid by the same methods by the Dt'.'tii'crHcy. Such a political fight us lias been witnessed in that district is seldom seen. Soparat" it from party and personal dei-ire to beat aud there in practically no Issue. AVby? In the first place were the Democrats to elect a majority of the Honsa of Represen- tatives, they could only keep up a fruitless ugitutioii on the tariff with a view of re- pealing tha McKiuloy bill, against which their shafts are now directed. It is Tery doubtful if they could pass a measure in the Fl'iuse repealing it, aud if they could it is certain it would not be passed by the Senate. If it were it would be vetoed by the President. That is why we say it would bo a fruitless agitation, regardless of the merits of tbe measure. Hence there is some significance in the made by Speaker Reed that this tariff agitation should cease for business reasons. The only thing that could result from a renewal of tho fight in congress, would be to prolong the condition of unrest. "We have ail along doubted the wisdom of the ilcKiuloy revision. So far as the tariff could affect business, the other seemed enough. But now that it has been done, it should be sustained until business can adjust itself to it and until experience shall demonstrate its merits aud its defects. As nothing can be accomplished by its opponents in the way of replacing this measure during this auiuinistration and for n year after it'shall have expired, if then, it is plain that there can bo but ouo mo- tive iu keepi'ig np the tariff txumoil aud that is to keep bubiuosa unsettled for 1892 presi'.niitiul campaign thunder." This is feckless politics; it is political desperation; it in partisanship ran mad; it is not statesmanship, but it is an injustice to labor, to enterprise and may load to something worse. The matter should now rest until tho stnolce of tho contest shall have clonred away, when the people can take a calm survey of tho situation. Let the attention of legislators be directed to matters that are more palpable aud really need adjustment. Those are the things to bo considered by tho people when they vote. What Sotuc H.ira Done to tret th. ciaw... I y cbjckens. A great trades-union congress, com- posed of U-gaics from all the labor ;tlpress _______ organizations in Great Uritain, met at Lirerpool on the let of Sepif.inbr-r. It was composed of five hundred delegates, including' u-n women, and represented most of tho larjro trades of the Kingdom. The principal act of the congress was to pass a resolution in favor of reduc- ing the time of laboring to eight hours a day and of rr.uking eight hours a day's labor by act of Parliament. This was not passed, however, without a good deal of htrr-nuous opposition on the part i for Supper, 25c. Of some of tit: older delegates. Tho rnf-Kinjf of ibis and tho strikes whicn are frequently tak- ing place in almost every civilized country and region render the subject SICK HEADACHE. LOOSE'S KED CLOVER 1'ILLS CURES !-i''K Dyspepsia. Indigestion, conatlpation. use. per Box. 5 Boxes lor For sale bv Trimble Bros. Ixilein. 0. Bread in the city, at T. D. Witherspoon's Broadway. 52-j'; on J. Atchisoti i; Son and get one of those new open front Shirts for LUMBER FOR SALE. of what laws liavo been passed by the Over feet of lumber, includin posts, frame stuff and boards, will be sol Tho IMttsburg Diapiiti'li says that tmturnl gas. like Colonel Sellers' hogs, will bo jewelry in and about Tittsbnrg on and af- ter December 1. They will advance rates fifty per cent on that date. Tho pressure iu tho iiolds declining and there is coii- sidi'r'ib'.i' hustling to got buck to u more subita-.itial furl supply. BoLt'irs the world over trtmt, doctors for nothing. A surgeon in Dover, however. u doctor C21 for attendance, and the hitter leftncd to pay nud went to court. The plaintiff pleaded that, though pliyM.-iMiis treat their colleagues freo when in active practice, retired medical men. like the do'eiidniit, have to pay like other peo- plo, aud the Judge accepted that viow. The Iirst Methodist Episcopal Church in Cincinnati to vote on tho question of the of women as delegate's to the Goiier.il Conference has given a majority iu fuv >r of the proposition. The fact, ho-.vir. that only one-twelfth of vot- ing nu-iiiber'diip c.ist their ballots on the question argue-! a lack of interest in tho ftubjo, 1 on tho part of the members of the seyeral nations regulating labor es- pecially interesting at tbis time, say3 Youth'3 Companion. Thus far no European nation has passed a law limiting tbo tlmo of the labor of working-men. Such measures as have been passefl relate for the taost part to the protection ard lim- itation of the labor of women and chil- dren, and tho greater part of these measures have become law within the fifteen years. For instance, by a statute passed by the Uritisl) Parliament in 1378. women, and children between fourteen and eighteen years of aye, who are engaged in tho textile factories uro allowed to work only ten hours a day. Children under fourteen years can work only six hours a day. In other industries the re- spective periods of labor aro increased over the figures stau-d by half an hour. Moreover, no child under ten years of ago is permitted to work in an English factory at all, and all night work is for- bidden to women, young girls and chil- dren. In France tbo limit of age ia a little narrower, for in that country no child less than twulve years old is allowed to work in any factory, or other hard man- nal employment, oxcopting that they may do so in textile, glass and paper factories. 'The French law, moreover, differs from that of mart countries in that it limits tho hours of labor aocordlnjf to tho degree of education of tho laborer. Children between twelve and fourteen yours who havo had a good elementary education aro allowed to work twelve hours a day; those who have not, only six. This Is to enable the less educated to attend school a part of every day. Tho French also forbid work on Sundays and nights to all boys under sixteen years, and all girls under twenty-one. In viewing tho steps taken by the young German Emperor to Improve the condition of his laboring subjects, the present stato of tho Gorman labor laws becomes interesting. Already legisla- tion has done much, at least In the di- rection of protecting- working-women and children. German children under twelve years of ago aro forbidden to take work ia factories and mines, and those between twelve and fourteen, are legally restrict- ed to six hours a day. Those botwoon fourteen and sixteen years old may work ten hours a day in most of the in- dustries, and at spinning eleven hours. Children arc not allowed to work tivccn half-past eight o'clock at night and half-past five in tho morning, nor on except In cases of urgent ne- cessity, to be determined by tbe Bundea- rath, or upper house of Parliament. It is noteworthy, however, that the German labor laws have as yet dono little to protect working-women of ma- ture apo. The principal law on this sub- ject piovides that tho Ituudesrath shall bave to prohibit femalo labor in certain industries, or to restrict it by rC'gr.l .nous, and tho same body may, if it SIM i lit, prohibit night work to any spec; 1 i'hiss. Evt 7i despotic Russia has. issued de- creos v.hich regulate tho hours of work of and children according to tho exiL't-m-ies of particular industries. Children under twelve years, with a few specified exceptions, aro not allowed to work iu Uussuin factories; those between twelve and tUtx-cn years aro restricted to eight hours daily, and may not work more than four hours continuously. Children under seventeen years and women ;ire not allowed to work in Rus- sia in spinning or textile industries it night, and the Russian law requires em- ployers to pay attention to the education of their workinr people. Similar regulations and restrictions to those which have already been de- scribed exist !n Belgium, Sr-ain, Aus- tria, riung-ary. Holland, Italy, Norway Sweden, and Denmark. It will seen that there is little or no legisla- tion which restricts or imposes condi- tions upon thn labor of full-grown men, but in many countries there are vigor- >ns agitations to extend tho limitations jf law to working-men also. tit from 87 to per thousand, to redu about the quamity of Wall Paper. Borders and Decorations we hare in our All good stock and desirable patterns. The'e goods MUST BE SOLD. The clearance >ale prices we are makirif will do the work. You have never heard of such low prices on Waif Paper and Borders as we rre quoting. We can save you money on even- bolt. Give us a trial. Write for samples and prices, or if possible come to our H, H. IISTPC i WICK BLOCK. LEETONIA.QHIO Fur Capes and Muffs now on play see our window. dis- Our THOS.MORGAN the Opera House Shoe Store. 54-70 Sold Out. Comrades and customers, having sold my shoe shop at No. 20 West Main street to W. L. McNeal 1 would respectfully re- commend him to your patronage, as he will give you the sams prices as I have. Yours truly. A. McAiLlSTEE. McUONNELLUU ONES. Table Bird Cages, go 49 Main street. and Floor Oil Cloths and to D. B. Burford'a, No. 92 tf In Linens, our stock is replete with attractions from 30c Ali-Liu- i en dice to Damasks.both plain nd fancies. The 'J0e Bleached j jamask. with Napkins to match, re beauties. The natural iini.-hc.-d 3arnesley Tableings and Crashes J ear longest and improve in ap- j >earance with use. Jn thU de- jartment we will tempt you with he fewest Crashes possible that re glazed finish, and are about as Our Fall and Winter assortment iractical for drying purposes as a Of Dress Goods and Trimmings )iece of straw paper. Economy is complete in every line. ertainly not practiced, nor satis- i action found in buying low priced i New styles in Robes, in Dalilia rash. We believe that we can Green, Blue. Brown and Plum. Has inst arrived. BIG BARGAIN'S iu every department CO1IE AND SEE US. NOBBY SIT TINGS. PANTALOON OOODS. 67 Main St. MINK., Sept. 17th, '89. J. M. Loose Keel Clover Co., Detroit: You have uy consent to use my name in praise of your Pile Ointment. You cannot make language strong enough to exprebs iny faith in it after the cure it has effected iu me. I have recommended it to a dozen or more of my friends, aud iu every in- stance I have cured them completely. GEO. S. CoorEE. TO BUILDERS OF HOMES IttoM tola For Flue In Ohio! The lots on Highland avenue, also on East Green and East High streets iu J. T. Brooks' are now offered for sale at reasonable prices; and if small monthly payments. All streets will be graded and sidewalks laid in cinder without expense to the purchaser. Water and gas mains will also be laid without de- lay. The high elevation of these lots, their nearness to the street railway, and freedom from noise and smoke place them among the most favored tiles for homes in the State. A plat may be seeu at th'e Formerb National Bauk. Accommodations have been provided in the sub-division for boarding horses at reasonable rates, for persons who do not to build stables, or incur the expense of keeping a'tired man. 38tf "HTAnother crate of Brown Frentham Ware, which we are giving away with teas, uovr ready, at S. Grove k Son's. 45tf PILES- PILES. PILES. LOOSE'S RED CLOVER PILE REMEDY. Is a positive specinc tor all forms or the disease blliid. Bleeding. Itching. Ulcerated aud Protru aing Piles. Price SOc. For sale by Trimble Bros GIVEN AWAY J Cold AVatcliCH and Genuine Iu Salem! :u H fon- by S-.3V something to talk bocfn-o ei-Fresident Cleveland while recently to argue a case be- did not call at tho of eti- thiiiii, ha.- also boen violatoi rhelp-. Minister to be-on in :vt e.illod on the diplomatic dis- :-ft hi5 I'. which Prince I'-is-iuarck has a strong supcr- concerning the number tbreo, .sidi rs lias always played jvnani van in his lift-. Tlieanus i.i-.ir over the irotto, "In uite three trefoil leaves r.-f oak all caricatures of him with ihrro hairs on and Mario; hf has cs- i-'ricdrichsruhc, Varzin Scboa- has in trcniics of of liiTvr 1. c t'ae tiii is the them a year. wjlh jcefii, hi e ar- e En-.pcr- trip'.t: three ives. tl.e na- i-s. The il the uitransor.tancs, he sorvcd three Gfrrra- prohibitory aad -irt Ia Genr.any tbo iclepbenc wn estimated Vo issirober S1.S35; nro. of 1 in Greai Britain, 20.4M; tbev ila KnS5-a- "-3S5: Ja Italy, ?.IS5; in wH-.-..- a flatter of H tb-I 4-200; in 2'21S: !a ia Switzerland. la 0{ nnl.itJOTjs Aroencfta girl? with !n Denmark. Tbe World's Tea Compaur, recently foruietl iu New York, have rented tbe store room, No. 2'J BroatUvny, (formerly Cowles music as a branch for tho purpose of placing before the public their delicious tea. Their method is both novel auc unique. Tho tea is put up in neat cans Tho company puts iu every can of tetx splJ a souvenir, such us genuine diamonds, ru bies, pearls, Unquotes, thysls and many other too nurneroui to mention, iu solid gold settiugs, bolii gold watches aud mar.y other articles o lessor value. There are no gifts, tokens o ns the can and contents comprise the snle aud are sold at the uniform pric of 51. 00. Of course this expeusive ndver ti'ing could not continue Ions. twenty being the limit, after tune the sonv will be withdrawn and the really choice goods will bo continued ou tale through an iigent at the same price. Even-body mus not expect n valuable souvenir. A partia litit of names of who find valua bies in these cans will follow daily. No 29 Broadway. Goo. II. Probert, 82 Woo Hand avonce tilver rn.stor: Win. Linkpn-Jtine. 37 Brond pickle castor; John J. Field, Eos If Kin street, diamond ring: Geo. .T. Wag oner. Alliance, fruit dish: John Kokel. 12; West Main street, fruit Ida Mn; Field. 184 East Main street, diamond ring PdTid Kirklnnd. 7th street, silver csJtor O'Brien, Lroadwu.v. >4 in silver li. H. McCrncken. 20 Waiuut ,-treet, -il i: silver; Flora Ilnffmnn. 173 East Fifth St castor; E. A. Biion, 110 Broadway castor; Miss Stnkes. 12-3 Dry street. ?1 in silver: P. W. llann.iy. Linroln nre line, cl Jn silver; Mary Mnii street, peat's cold Florence Hnrris Main diamond rir.z; Ella IIoll man. 123 East Pry street, silver J 15. .Schnffer. 121 Pry ?trc-et dollar; Evn East Broadway. dollar: Wpft Kighth street. diamond Ma Arnold, -ilver dollar; Thos. FoMh.' Ellwtrtb in noli: Vinrpnt, Ea-t M.iin street lady's C. brnkcru'i DRESS GOODS e you more for your money in he 10, 124- or 14c Crashes than ou could get out of a 7c one if ought at 5c. You may feel perfectly safe now o buy goods at the prices we are laming which are the from the new Tariff rill a reaction is sure to come, yiost goods we sell are directly affected. of all colors and many dif- erent qualities. Serges and Henriettas, in plain colors, with plaid and striped-Silks and colored Velvets to match; all shades. BRIAN BROTHERS, 61 and 62 Main St, Telephone No. 30. conformity to a reasonable request and a right movement, aud in harmony the busmes interest of the town, we close our store at 7 p. m. --------FINE ------CONSISTIXO Apricots.Nectaiines, Peaches, and Prunes. Also Cran- berries, Green and Dried Apples. ----KELLY ISLAND---- WHITE LIME, Alcron anfl Portland Cement, STOCK, AND DAIRY SALT ALWAYS IN STOCK. iHTGive your lawns a top dressing of our Excelsior Lawn Grower. Butter Fresh Eggs and Fine a Specialty. J.M. Brown Co. H. Pelzcr Bro.. Stnflio for forts of Art in Bouse AND CHURCH FURNITURE, Altars, SUUunry, JManlels.. Wctzel Lciucr, ----MANlTACTntERS OF---- Doors, Sash, Window Frames Interior Hard nud Soft Wood ESTIMATES FURNISHED FKOM PLANS Tlie undorslgnc'J Is prep.iri.xl to attend sales ol all KlmK as ;IIK! TITIIIS v-.u-oa awe. MOHHIS MIKIVEK. Auctioneer. All-Wool Cloths. 54 in. wide, 90c. t: ct i. u (5QC- oOc. 1 yd. 25c. Black Dress Goods in many dif- ereiit qualities and weaves and some Novelties entirely new in the market. Black Brocades, in Silk, for combination with silk, wool or velvet. Broadcloths, in Heliotrope, Mul- berry BrowD, Navy Blue, per yard. All-Wool in Stripes, 38 inches wide, 3Sc per yard. AVrapper Goods, in all colors, at 12ic, 15c, 20c and 25c. One case Plaids, for dresses, comforts, lounge covers, etc., 5c a is one ol' the many bargains we offer. GUNS A large stock of GUNS and RIFLES just received by Carr Tescher, BROADWAY. CALL AND EXAMINE THEM. S. J. HEWITT, PHOTOGRAPHER, First door west of City Hall. The Oldest and most Con- venient Gallery in the City. "STBeing located on the ground floor, the labor of climbing stairs, so fatiguing to all, especially old people, is avoided. First-class work of every description at Reasonable Prices. Jackets and Cloaks Many new styles of Jackets just in. The Reefer is a very popular rough finished cloth, in Black and Navy Blue, at and many other styles of New Cloth Jackets, Misses' and Chil- dren's Garments in long, heavy Cloaks and Short Jackets, in dif- ferent styles and for all sizes. Fur Capes, Muffs and Children's Furs. Blankets, Underwear. Hosiery, Comforts and Yarns. These de- partments are well stocked with bargains for you. Blankets, ?1.00 to S.50 a pair. Heavy Cotton Ribbed Under- wear, in Grey and White. 38 to 50c. Ladies' Misses' and Children's Cotton and Cashmere Hose at all prices. MaltToy's Fresh Oysters (Solid meat, no Best Quality Crack- ers, Xew Stock Handsome Lamps, Fishing Tackle, Oils, Window Glass, Bird Cages, all kinds Brushes, Paints, Toilet Soaps, Combs, Pocket Books, Cigars and Tobaccos, White Seal Carbon Oil, Etc., Etc., at HAWKINS' DRUG STORE, Wilhelin Co., LUMBER DEALERS Cor. Depot and JEtua Furnished on Application. FRESH FISH. J. TO" FOR -AT TUE- West tnd Grocery A Fresh Lot of Marra's Cafe and Crate! Try our Evaporated Blackberries, in cold: cirdA fine: Neliic r: Bill farmer, Lir- 1 Bolgiunj, 4.674; ja matnrsoa-.ftl drenas are blcaded! J.S72; I of a coroaet Bui most probs- j in Tho Berlin b'.e re-ntt will an influx to these shores 1 Boersen Courier estin. ico aurobor of R horde of alleged nobl-isen. I In America at ia all tbe world ring; Greea streetcoM Jos, 41 stroct. A. Howortb. 27 Trem -r.t ?i ring: Aicelii Hattie Btierly. Broadway, gold rise: C. W. ard, 255 Main ?Ufret diamond ricg; X. Reich. 130 Green fnsit Henrr Jtoctf. 136 Frosdway. 5ilTer better disb: McNeil. SI West Green ftreet, RoW rlnc; Neiiie BowtDan, Ells- worUi,

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