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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 24, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. Ffl I VOL. IL NO. 252. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 24. 1890. TWO CENTS. Discovery of a Fatal Error ia tbe Tariff BUL Claimed That the Mistake May Inval- idate the Entire Xlie Blander lu tlie Section Relat- ing to on of I'rouiinont Men on the Subject. NEW YOKK, Oct. Mc- Pherson very recently wrote as lollows to a member of a prominent importing house in this city: "1 beg to call your attention to the conference report and tariil bill sent to you about two weeks oarnphlet of 214. pages. On page 175 will {ind amendment 449 and section SO, ihe reading matter relating to drawbacks on tobacco strirken out. Turning over to page 17t5, sixth line from tho top, you will find the following: 'Conference restores soe- tionSO.' Now in the tariff bill boforo you you will find section 30. 'That on and after the 1st day of in? with six cents per all the rest of original sc-otion 80 out altogether. This omission is fatal to the bill and in the opinion of eminent lawyers hero, Senator Carlisle among them, it vitiates the whole bill. It is an internal revenue section, but, being part of the tariff bill, passed. It stands and falls together." In accordance with this discovery a protest against Collector Erhart's offi- cial action under the McKinley bill has been forwarded to the leading- importers in tnis city for signature. Under the law protest against the collector's as- sessments can not be lodged until the liquidation of entry, and must be lodged within, ten days after that stage in the importer's business with tbe Govern- ment Senator Carlisle, who was one of the conferees, was asked what would be the effect of the omission of section 80 from the tariff bill. "I have be said, "examined the authorities on the sub- ject, but it seoms quita clear to me that the omission of one section is just as fatal to the bill as if all but ono had been omitted. If the President can sijfn part of a bdl passed by both houses, and make that a law, of course it makes no difference how small a part it is. Should the constitutional'ty of this law be tested in the courts the question would have to be determined by the journals of the two houses, because they constitute the only legal evidence of what was done. The two houses passed the tariff bill, but in different forms. When it came back from the committej there was noth- ing to act upon except its report, which I suppose was entered upon the journal of both houses, as Is usual in such cases." WASHINGTON, Oct. alleged fatal defects in tho new tariff bill formed an interesting topic of discussion in offi- cial circles yesterday, and. while the de- fects were not thought to invalidate the bill as a whole, sentiment was almost unanimous that section 30 of the tobacco paragraph, which was omitted in its en- tirety, could not be enforced and whore it by coustruction referred to par- agraphs it might impair their strength. As to the law signed by the President not being the law passed by Congress, Private Secretary Kalford said the bill signed by President Harrison was the same bill signed by the Speaker of House and the President of the Senate. These officers by their signatures certi- fied that the bill had passed their re- spective branches of Congress and their attestation of that fact was tho usual mode of procedure and the only notification tho President ever received that a bill had passed. Whothor tho law was constitutional or not was a mat- ter for the courts to decide. All former tariff acts contained more or less omissions and errors, and even as late as February 27, 1S77, an act was passed to suoply omissions in the Re- vised Statutes. It is thought at tho Treasury Department that tho same course will be pursued in rocrard to any defects of the present tariff law if they are of a character serious enoug-b to call for it. Cut Hl< Wifp'a Throat. XA'-Hvii.r.y., Tenn.. Oct W. D. Hynrs murdered his wife near Lebanon jcstorday morning. His wife had eloped George Ditman in September, but returned Wednesday and was met at Lebanon by her husband, who accom- panied her to the tollgate, one mile from town, whore thoy spent the night. He he has no apology to make, but rather see her dead than untrue- He cut her throat with a pocket-knife. Lynching ia expected. That Hn Oct Ex-Presldcnt Cleveland arrived in Washington yester- To-day ho will appear before the Supreme Court and arjjue a case. Thero a rumor circulated yesterday that Mr. Cleveland bad dropped dead. He toid of this and ia-jgaiogly an- gered: "You niay tell HIT frienda that J save :eit better ia my life tbaa J   ..-4 tin- I.eMicae to BxJtoUM the Dt-p.it tment Krcontfe WAsiuxr. rov, Oct: special couimittt-e of tho National Civil Service Reform Loa.ruo, consisting of W. D- chr-iriuan; Charles J. Bonaparte, Wayne -MacVeagh and S. S. Rogers, ap- pointed to inquire into the condition of tho Federal service and tho operation of oho, reform law, has submitted tho re- sults of its investigation of removals   Turn Her Wi-ulth Into Another Form. FRANCISCO, Oct 24. In railroad circles considerable quiet talk is boing indulged in and thr; talkers claim to know tbat an appraisrmcnt is to bo made at an early date of tho Southern Pacific company property, at tho in- stance of Messrs. Stillman and Hubbard, of New York, representing Mrs. Hopkins- Soarles. This extremely wealthy lady wants to sell out and put her money in securities with coupons attached to them. tiny AJBTRT PAKK. U. JL, 0ci 24. KoskcU of Lonf Branch, t i labor ia tbe pvalMatiary. lot Srnt to f'rlmofi. OMAHA. N'jb., Oct and Mrs. Ilarlow Davis havo boon arrested for violation of tho Federal laws in sending obscene mattter thro ugh tbe mails. Tho complaint is made by I. M. Hay, of Waterloo, Ia., who alleges that tho'Dav- ises aro trying to blackmail him. The prisoners are residents of .San Francisco and have been in Omaha for a few weeks, where thoy havo been doing a thriving business as mediums and healers. International Brotherhood of lilack- ATLANTA, Ga., Oct The first meeting of tho International Brother- hood of Blacksmiths baa closed. Pre- vious to the meeting there had never been in existence an international body. The bringing about of tbe organization is largely due to tbo efforts of B. Mtillins, an Atlanta blacksmith. Mr. Mnllins was elected president of tbe organization. A Jfo RIVER, Mass.. Oct The mystery surrounding the yacht found ashore at Happy Hollow Wednesday baa cleared up. The boat stolon last Thursday by sc-ven yonngmea. who sailed to Prudence Inland. They aban- doned the yacht at Bristol in Sun- day's jrale she was driven ashore where found. ROCHBSTKW, y. Y.. Oct Thursday was the day of tba Uaivmallst na- tional conference. The session was opened by Jrijre Wallace, of Chicago, whoconttnned his discussion of qnesttoa of odoeation. Paper, wen read tbe day by a of promlaeat diriaos. Day Wla. Oet H-Willlsm Os- and MUM and then com- ttotttatto tetoUdty fifty Recent Happening In Other ies and Towns. THE LfcGtsLATCKK. The Hoiue to SiMnend the Rulm nnd the Non-l'nrttuku COLCMiirs. Oct. tho Sen ate mot Senator Lowry offered the follon resolution: It Is allegedin tlie iu ciunatl Commercial-Gazette that the clerks of the Senate conspired to cut transmission ot Souate bill Xo. 3SS to the liouso of therefore Rcsoheil. Th.it it committee or thrve Senators bo appointed by the President of this body to investigate tho charges forthwith. Mr. button Rave noticv to discuss und tho resolution went over The fol- lowing bills were pauttd: To rep.-al :m set. 11. IS9J to Gallon to Tmrchasw lands nnd erect IniildiiiK's: to author- ize Ma'icaestur. Comity to borrow Jl.- (XXI to be used ror purposes; to author lie Monroevllle Huron County to borrow I'jQ.- COJ for tUe purposx. of electric Hght plant nnd other unpiovotueiits. ilr Kichurds cd ih.it tin- cominutcu on mu- nicipal Xo i be relieved from further consideration of his hill p- for the up- nolnlinout by tho fi.nd trustees or a Decennial Uonrd of (or Cincinnati. Wr. Lowry moved to lay this motion ou the tnblc. which prev.illed. The Republican Senii- tors oITera.l the following, which spre.ul on the jonrnnl: the HupublUnn Senators now pros nt iu the Sea ,to. hereby proto.-t Against the action of th.s body in refusing to pt rmit any b.l1 a'lolis'iinjt the Decennml Hoard ef Tqnalizitlon In Cincinnati to be discussed ou nt this e.x. raonlinary sesj'on of the Oe-o-al especially In view or the fact that siu'h rvcomuieuded in the message of the Goverr.or aijd gu en us 0110 ot for this soss on AdjonrnecL time until nearly noou was con- sumed m passint; local bills sent over from the Senate. Mr Hrnrn mndc another attempt to introduce his bill to so amend the statutes as to allow tuo members inile. go for attending this enrnorilinarj' session, but tho House refused to gu.inenil ihe rules forthft" purpose, Mr Pumph- rey a Semite bill authorizing Bellefontaiix) to issue in bonds for the purpose or secur- ing the shops of the Dip Fourrallrosd was tnkon up and paase-I against the protest of Mr. Schu- ler. of Ciawfoid, who dunned that It would cnuie Gallon to lose the ?hops nnd be an inius tice to that town. Mr. Brady's Semite bill itu- thor'tlng Monroevllle, Huron County, to Issue in bonds for the P'irposo of establishing an electric plant ami Improving streets passed Mr. McDermott offored a rexolu- tlon, which w.is tabloJ. providing that the Governor furnii-h thu Lepi'lature such evidence as he truiy have touching corrup- tion or dishonesty charged against Cincinnati boards or any member thereof, and any informa- tion he may have showlrtt the necessity for ro- form in the sjstem of government Mr McDer- mott opposc-d tabling the resolution on tho ground that the Hon-se could not Intelligent- ly on the charges of corruption without havluK the evidence before It. The Senate non partf can Bo ml of Public Improvements bill, provid- ing for an nppomtmetit by the Mayor of Cincin- nati WHS then Ukeia up aud ruad tho second time in Its regular Mr. IfcMnken moved a of the rules that It might be placed npon papsane. No one desiroJ to discuss the question at ihti point, aiul vote was taken, re- In a refui'il to suspend the 70, nays 33. It required seventy-ill votei. The House then adjourned After thu House a Ijournpd something of a MbsatioD Developed in connection with an al- leged mutilation of the House journal by Sena- tort Ganmer and Klchnrdg The engrossing clerk of the Senate made a mistake when the blU was engrossed, putting the wront? title to the measure. In thli condition it T.-as sent to the House, when the error was discovered, It In claimed would the bill invalid, ex- cept on bein? returned in the usual formal way to the Senate for corrertii-n, n th ng -bat w.is not dono. The cl.iim i.s now made thai fjuua tors Gnumer and Richards came over to lh.) House and marts the changes afte' tho bill hrd passed itssucond reading. A res'ilulion prov'.J ing for an Investigation will be o.T. red. HILL'S LAST SP'JKCH. New York's Governor Work In Ohio by an In the Capital of Holmes Conntr. Mn.LEnaiiuno, O., OcL Hill, of Now York, was grentod Thurs- day by an 'audienoo from the banner Democratic county of Ohio that should make tho heart of any man feol proud. A rain during tho day did not koop Democrats away. Larpo platforms woro erected for an open air roeerinff, but it was necessary to go to thn city hall, where only about people could hear him. The audience was composed of the gray-haired voters of Holrooa and every township was represented. Governor Hill was followed by Hon. John C. Warwick, who made a short ad- dress. But 'or a continuous rain tho mooting would havo been tho largest hold in this for years. Tn In- Trlml for 0., Oct. Howard MacQncry, the Canton Episcopal clergy- man whoso book, "Evolution and Chris- buch stir in church cir- cles and who was accused of heresy on account of his views on Christ's divin- ity and resurrection, will bo tried by a church commission, of which Rov. Dr. Ganter, of Akron, will bo chairman. Tho trial will be hold some time next month and will bo one of groat Interest. Tho accused rwtor has letters from prominent Episcopal clergymen all over tho country, toiling him to Cjfht tho case. Clrvrlnntl Mftn In Vir.xXA, Oct. is reported that Joseph black, of Cleveland, 0., the con- sul of the United at Pestb. while journeying to his post publicly com- mented on the conduct of Austrian af- fairs and tho government has thereby boon offended. It is said that the gov- ernment of Austria-Hunsrary will with- hold Mr. Black's exequatur, pending satisfactory explanations of tho consul's course. It is possible that thf govern- ment may absolutely refuse to issue the exequatur._______________ t Ti, Oct rumor wjth an appearance of some foundation in fact Is that the Commercial-Gazette will change owners November 1. It is claimed Governor AJjjer will be one of the backers and that ex-Governor For- aker will dictate its policy. The rumor that John R. McLean was an ansuccessful bidder for the paper. That deal of come kind was on in this con- nection been rumored lays past. _______________ CtatmMM Crrr. Oct K. Polk, W. W. Polk and 2. C. Morrit, hew, claim to be the belra Robert Morris, the of ttoe They will nits for the recovery of acres of land ta York, Pvmtrrlvants sod frsnted to Eobrsrt Morris sad claimed A GAME BATTLE. RouniU B-iqulred lu Order Dixon. Cotnrvd Might Whip Johnnjr Murphy. U. I., Oct. fight between George Dixon of Boston, and Johnny Murphy, of HaT- erhill, took placo at the Gladstone Clul in this city last uijjut. It was won by Dixon, Murphy's seconds throwing the sponge in the fortieth round. It wai Seen at tho start that Murphy was over- matched, but it took Dixon two hours and fortv-flve minutes to whip him. The fight was for aside and trophy. Thi'ro was an immense crowd in attendance. It was thouv-ht by tho way th a 'M started in that IV, von would win in short order, and tin to tho sixteenth round ii looked as thousrh tho round would finish Murphy, but he revivod considerably aftor that round an I took his punishmont gamolv. Hn w n badjy used up at tho 3nish and though able to crawl over tho j against his seconds iu ho wnn- ov.-r r cornor aftor tho rpfcro" '.in 1 'locision ami o'Torod to eonti.iu Ho presuntod a pitiable sp> i close of t.lio bis fucr' with blooA :ind his ino'ith for breath. Dixon ayinoil fatigued and was uninjuioi for a bruiso over tho loft oyo. CUAKGUD WITH cjto -r.ni ;U rjio ton'' '.VSTI 'li.-i Arrrnt of Smplrlnim tat it Crliii.- til. CHICAGO. Oot Th'ir.siJay afternoon tbe police arrested Fi-.in'c iiurns, who says ho is from Buffalo: Syo, hailing from Montreal, nnd' .lohn Mur- phy, from Toronto, on suspicion of hav- ing murdorod Miohaol at Dcs- plainos Thursday nicrht. Two of the men woro captured nu.ir P-ilatino and tho third two miles oast of Dosplalnes. Tho men's story is that hnvo boon working for a woman on Arthur street, cutting wood. Tuny wore paid oIT Thurs- day afternoon and went on a drunk. Two of them wontout on tho Northwest- ern train at and thu other Inter, so they bocamo separated. Of course, 11 their story is true, thoy had nothing to do with tho murder. it, n-ag committed at eight o'clock. Archu- strout is but a small thoroughfare tjn the AVo.st Side and the police do not thtnk wood cuttlnsf story can bo truo. It is being investigated. BLOWS TO ATOMS. Kxploftlon Kulin nntv In Vnctorj Dntl Ii nuit DxiltruutloB In BltliiCiRroitT, Conn., Oct. One oi the ftilminato Aopartmonts of the tTnion Metallic Cartridge Company was blown up with' terrible force yesterday, caus- ing groat consternation among tho 000 omployet in the main fatstory. George Maker And his son, Frodori'jlc liaker, were ottiployod in the doiiartrnnnt nt the timo. A moment boforo tba explosion the became frightened and from the place. Tho fathor was blown to atoms, his body being scattored inovory direction. Doceaaed was over fifty-yonrs old. Tho explosion a largo quantity of glass in the main building on the opposite aido of thn street Tha largo force of operatives, mostly girls, bocamo panic-stricken and Hod from the shop. The of tho explosion is not known. _ itptkpor Mnn Indlctix! BINI.IFAMTO.V, N. Y., Oct. Nine indictiuontb woro reported tho attaches of tho Loader by tho grand jury on account of that pa- per's attitude during thu recent cigar- makers' strike. Six are for throe against tbo irianagpr, two against the editor and one against tho city editor- Thero is also one indictment against each of the spccitiud for crimi- nal contempt of court in disregarding injunction issued by Forbes which prohibited all persons from un- lawfully encouraging tbe strikors. The accused furnished bail 011 each indict- ment. AHejcv' to Cixci.vjfATJ, Oct A special from Columbus, 0., says: .Senators Of.unj'.'r, Democrat, and RichsrJ have been caught doctoring tho records of tho House by altering t.hf: lioard of Public Irnpr vomc-nt bill Wed- nesday evening it coiao over to the Ilouso. Uvnioeratic leaders in both houses arc greatly enraijod at this recourse to criminal acts on tho part of Governor Campbell's lupo.jrt'-rs. There is intense excitement and arrests are threatened. Sensational developments sre promised in tno House- to-day. It on tl.9 TiriJt s NEW VOISK, Oct 2J. announce- ment is made of tho withdrawal from business of the house of Herman Born- heitner. Son A Co., No. 705 Leonard street, who have for many years boon largo importers of the woolens and worsteds used in the cheaper and me- dium grades of clothing. .Tero-no Bern- heimer said yesterday that t.if-y were compelled to clono out buiin-'1 -s -r-.mso of tbe prohibition in th- now law against the jcoods trhioh the firm import from Shot. O.. Burton An- lersoa, son of An-iorsoTi, of EInron, was accidontaily shot Wodncs- day afternoon. He was on a load of po- tatoes and asked the hired man 10 band bim a shotgun. The gun caught on tbs wagon snd discharged, contents taking effect In Anderson's side. tK Herx, of this city, removed 143 shot and four wads from tho wound. Thursday tnotftiag. _ i i i Tirrnr, O., Oct K ArndA M old dtittn of Tlffla, dropped Tbandar morainff of disease. Mary J. Massomr. County's old- est settler, MJ-; Iaukc4 bat (owteen ot a. a   

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