Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Salem Daily News

Location: Salem, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II. NO. 251. SALEM. OHIO. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 23. 1890. TAVO CENTS. Six persons Killed on the ciunati Soutkeru Koad. Freight and Pa sender Trains Collide iu a Tuiiuel with Terrible Two People Meet Death and a Score are Injured t'lriningham, ion In Fop. CiM-ivsATi. Oct two o'clock morning southbound pas- seiijrcr train No. 9 on the Cincinnati Southern railroad ran into a freight train in a tunnel a few miles south of Somerset, Ivy. Six persons were killed outright, while several othors were fa- injured. To add to the horror of the situation tho front cars of the pas- train took fire. 1 he killed and injured are as L. Doegan, postal clerk; ftro- fireman Gould, brakeman MoiiJTomery, express messefigLT Ru2- nir, waster Long. In; Engineer Pinelott, engineer Tay'or, postal clerk Gayle, Misi Allio Dayton, Tenn.; Archie Murphy, Madison County, Ind., and R. A. Wjieel- er, Now Orleans. The accident was caused by tho freight engineer moving without orders. The freight sidetracked at Sloan's Valley until one southbound passenger passed and then followed it, the engineer be- lieving ho could make tho next side- track before meeting the other passen- ger train, which was only a short dis- tance behind the first one. midway of the tunnel there was a terri- ble crash, followed by the groans of dying and injured. Both engines were totally demolished, in addition to sev- eral coaches and freight cars. To add to the horror two of the coaches caught fire and Postal Clerk Doegan was burned alive. The more fortunate passengers turaod their attention to rescuing those Imprisoned in the wreck and who were being consumed by tho flames. Thoso taken out were removed to neighboring houses, where they were attended by physicians sent out by tho company. The less to the railroad company will be S25.000. BIKHI.SGU.YM, Ala., Oct. Late Tuesday night a passenger train on the Kansas City, Memphis Birmingham railroad pulled out of the depot here without a conductor or a flagman, the engineer misunderstanding a signal. Five miles out the engineer discovered his mistake and backed his train with- out'iights or a man on the'fwir platform of the car. He ran into an outgoing freuht train, killing two persons and seriously injuring twenty others, one fatally. KANSAS CITY, Oct. bad wreck occurred on the Union Pacific railroad a short distance of Arraourdale a. m. Wednesday. A freight train had loft this city ahead of tho Union Pacific passenger train and was stopped west of Armonrdale on account of an accident to the trucks of ome of tho freight cars. The Union Pacific passenger train which followed close behind was stopped and a flagman was sent back to warn an ex- pected Rock Island eastbound train, which uses the Union Pacilic track into the city. On account of tho heavy fog tha engineer of tho Rock Island train did not see the flagman's signals until tuo late to stop the train and the loco- motive crashed into tho sleeping car of the Union Pacific train. The engine was a complete wreck and the engineer was buried benv-ath the debris. The fireman jumped and save I his hie. Several passengers and train- men were seriously injured. The dam- ago to tho company is estimated at Ouo. TIIE WOKLD'S FAttt. Meeting of the Committee I Securing from Foreign NEW YOUK, Oct A joint meeting of the foreign affairs committee of the World's Columbian Commission met at the Gilsey House in this city yesterday. There were also present foar inombers of the foreign exhibit committee of tho local directory. The conference was for the purpose of arriving at a g-eiieral un- dersiandintrcf the work of tbo commit- tees. Several members of tho Chicago committee were present. Now York is henceforth to be tho headquarters of the committee aud this was their first meeting. Gustavus Goward was con- firmed as representative of the i sion to Japan, and Romain Hitchcock, j representative to China. T.'ie plan sug- gested by an the Si.no Depart- ment for securing a South A'.m-ric-ia ex- i hiblt was takon un-Ifr j Prof. Adlor, of Jouin llopsins Uni- I versity, w.is appoints.'! tj superintend the pi Of the ttiise Hall War at Preseut. National League and American Asso- ciation People Eefuse to Confer with Brotherhood Delegates. Generally Conceded That the liesponslblu for the Present Coudltlon of Xnw YOKK, Oct predicted, the conference between tho National and Players' Leagues and the American Association has f.illen through, at least for the present. Tho Players' League conference committee made a demand that tho phyers be represented in Wed- nesday's conference. They persisted in their demand and as a consequence the Uus not boon held and tho submitted by b.i.3 ;-.rul proved by the for secur- settlement of tLe base baU trouble is as ing a exhibit fro-a the Orient. far of! as over. It is generally con- 1 ceded that the players are responsible for the present condition of alTairs. No conference was held yesterday, but there were over three hours of informal The idea is to iutorust tho merchants of the Orient so that t'.i'-y will exhibit at the fair the r.i.ir.u'Aoturos of their coun- try, as well as the ciibtomi and habits of the people there. A lai-e number of i meetings-some of which were bold m applications rocoived by the com- mission from foreigners that they bo allowed to represent tho com- mission in their re-.pcct.ivo countries. Sub-com-.Tiitt'-es v.vre appointed to form- ulate plans for usiifomiTy of action, after which the me, ti.ic: SCARCITY Ur s.-.l.v LULLS. The TreiiHurjr Sooa He- M.-, t ;hi Oj'. Complaint oomos to the Tre.'.sury Tlpo'irtniont from business men ah over -ouatry about the scarcity of mo.i.-v of small do- nominations, one ami tw j-lo.lar bills, and that in r.hav hive been 3ompcllod to us-' tho b'll cv statvlnrd silver dollars. Tho silver fund balance in the treasury is very IOAF a.i-1 thare is practically no silver ii the treasury against which silver eartifioAtos can be issued in donorninatio is to be cx- chanjeii for lc-f.il iTid T gold notes, as was done a year ajo. Tho demand for small notes is in- creasing daily aid U to continue until the holi.iays aro over. Some con- siderable relief, ho-sevir. is likely to come from the the new tioasury notes in payment f.ir bullion. So far the now notes havo bsen issued ouly in denominations of ton, ono hundred and ono thous.ind b it Tro tsurer tho general conference room at the Fifth Avenue Hotel anl others on. the outside. The representatives of tho three leagues met together at in the afternoon. There were present representing the National League: A. G. Spaldintr, of Chicago: J. B. Bay, of New York, and Charles H. Byrne, of Brooklyn. The representatives of the American Association were: Allen Thurman. of Columbus; Chris Von Der Ahe, of St. Louis, and William Ttarnio, of Baltimore. Tho Players' League representatives were: Al Johnson, of Cleveland; Wendell Goodwin, of Brook- lyn, and E. B. Talcott, of New York, ind of the players there wore John M. Ward, of Brooklyn; Arthur Irwin, of Boston, and Ed Hanlon, of Pittsburgh. The meeting between tho magnates and players was a stormy ono. but they all survived to fight another day. Alien Thurman in the chair. In looking about over his ooTimittee ho spied tho three players whoso presence was do- .-itiiiod to block ail the proceedings which have been taken for the salvation of tho base ball cause. Mr. Thurman declined to call tho confer- ence to order until tho three players had loft the room. Al Johnson, chair- man of tho Players' League committee, attempted to explain the presence of the three lie said that had Huston says that he will bo ready to is- been instructed to a comtnuni- sue tho new ones and fives by Novem- ber. 1 and feat tae department will then bogin to pay for silvor baliion in small bills a.s much as possible. After that time tho business dsmwls for smnll notes will be promptly met. Monument KIXORTOX, N. Y., Oct. strangers from the Hudson rivet coun- ties gathered here Wednesday to wit- ness the unveiling and dedication of the monument erected to the soldiers and sailors of Ulster County. The.ro was an imposing civic and military parade. The thorouybfaros alon? the lias of march were thronged with people, and public and private buildings wero pro- fusely decorated. Tho dedication too-: place in front of tho city ball, where tho monument is erected on a command- ing site. At loast persons wit- nessed its unveiling amid cheers, music, sinking and booming of cannon. Teoplo Kllleil at a ROME, Oct. tsrriblo acci- dent occurred on the line of the Chatia- nooga, uorno Columbus rallroa I ycs- ;ation statine that the original commit- tee of throe of the Players' League had been inorj ised to six. He hold that to ho equally represented in a conference whore there wero three National men ind three Association men the League should havo six representatives. Unless they had that number they dirt not feel like conferring with the other :omimitoes. A hot discussion then en- sued. It was held on the other side that 43 the committee had adjourned on Oo- tober 9 with but nino men, it should convene with that number. Tho proposition of the Players' League ;ould not be considered until tho con- ference of nino had assembled. Mr. Johnson acknowledged that this would the proper thing to do. The three players retired and the cou- Ec-ronco was called together. The com- from the Players' League then road by the chairman. It stated that three additional member bad been selected to look out for the in- ;erests of tbe Players' League, and asked that they bo admitted to tho conference. Mr. Johnson moved that tho new ra'jm- terday. Foui persons wore 1, three pc-rs bo accepted, but this motion was Tho Kranklln Fund. Botno.v, Oct. The aldormen have notified the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Comoany that attheondof six months the city will call upon it to turn over the principal and interest of the Franklin -fund, which now amounts The law requires that this term of notice be served. As yet no at- tachment has been placed on the funds here and it is the opinion of the trustees thai nothing wilJ be done as to k-rrr.! proceedings by the heirs until the Phil- adelphia suit is settled. Will Correct NEW YORK, Oct. Mr. Hamilton chairman of tho Woman Suf- frage party State Executive Committee, to-day publish a letter to Prot accepting- hia invitation to point out errors ia Bryce's book "The Ameri- He says thai the represents the condition of in America as TEuch better than it rialiy is, and mla-stases the effeel of suffrage la instantly. anJ tho fourt'i clir-il shortly afterwards. A southbound passongor train left Chattanooga OT time and was running at a moderate raw of speed. Approaching as the train lashed out of a cut a upon a crossing. The engine, struck r.h" wagon and killed J. W. Jenlrins. bi.-i wife and baby, and Mrs. James Buw- man. _______________ Hlc'i GMd In Indian Tnrrltorr. KANSAS CITY. the first reports were sent out that rich loads of jold-bflaring quartr, ha'l boon ia j the Arb.icklc Mountains, in tho Chicka- saw Nation. Indian Territory, the i stories were thought t-o have boon ox- {arrgerated, but now the news comes 'thatseveral car loads of rich quartz havo been taken Irora tho mines. Sen- ator Tabor, of Colorado, who has had specimens of the assayed, pro- nounces it the richest he evor saw. Fifth O.. Oct Smith, of murder in Pike County, night respited by Governor to November 2i Smith was Speaker BCKUN'STOX. Ia., Oct. Reed on arriving in this city yestyrday was mot by ex-Governor Gear and a com- mittee, who escorted rtie Speaker to Gov- ernor Gear's residence. In the after- noon Mr. Reed delivered a speech at the Opera House. Senator Harlaa intro- duced the Speaker astbe j IlcpuV.icvn of the I'nitcd S'ilc-5. Mr. I Keel's theme was the tu.rii7 and ;ho iefcatod on a voto of six to three, tbe National League, and Association voting against it. The throe represent- atives of tbe Players' League then with Irow from the conference and joined the throe excluded players They wore ornpha'.ic in their statements that the conforoncn was at an end, for tbriy would not confer unless the players wore given a bearing. The conference then idjournud, subject to tho call of tha president. _______ mftcr midnightu, fotfr pre- .Uhiayhss innocence e been evidence es- Is claimed tc dt-d. Old Qnxrrf 1 In Marrter. S. C. OcV 23. was shot and killed in ioa Tuesday by J. aepbew of Raines. 0 Wr.Sch of thoir cotton crop. fl. Withorspoon. Tho cause 'was an renewed by I'M ectiTe shares in says he Oct. Darid Cbaai- lead wofxs were a-sost totally br fin early Tnornir.7. origin of the -re .s naknown. Tfce is estimated fully by i firemen wen hurt ear V clerks, crime. YORK, Oct. The of Og- Hoa? and Charts M. Shot Killed by IJig Uu.vYVU.i.E, 111., Oct. 23. Grubbs, a farmer living four miles from here, was shot and instantly killed Tuesday night by his twenty-year-old stepson. Grubba had been in Grayrille all day drinking heavily and on going home began abusing his wife. She ran from tho house, followed by frfub who was about to plunge a knife into ber when her son. Arch W. Hicks rushed upon tho scene with a shotgun and fired at Grublw, instantly killing him. Koy 3f to ftrmtk JalL BOSTON, Oct. Pomcroy niade another attempt to from prison at Charleston. He was in soli tary confineaiont and succeeded in saw ing five oolts of his iron door anc had removed the angle iron which pro- fjcted tho bolts. He had been grantc-c tbe use of A lathe, saw and other tool to a tin pencil, for which be has been trying to get a patent, bu had tools a portion of the time for a, far difTerent purpose- OON'VESTIO.S. An tCxeamon to the, lt-t t t4t LIU-C- bjr Auxlllkrjr. Oct train loa'el engineers aud their friends le't this city Wednesday morning for Al- toona. They wero delegates to the con- vention of Brotherhood of Locomotive Sngineers and wero the guests of Uio Pennsylvania railroad on a visit to tho Altoona shops of the company. Theio vero thirteen curs, containing over 00) }cople. At Altoona every thing was carried out for their cutertaiivriont ac- cording to pro7ranime and the special train returnod to Pittsburgh last night. Tho Grand internatianal Auxiliary to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi- neers yesterday elected tho following grand officers- Grand President. Mrs. W. H. Murdock, Chicago, re-elected; Grand Vico President, Mrs. Cassell. Co- U., ro-eiected; Grand Secretary, Mrs. Harry St. Clair, Logansport, Ind., re-elected: Grand Treasurer, Mrs. G. W. row. Detroit, Chanlain, Mrs. M Johnson, Philadelphia: Grand Guide, Mrs. King, New .lersoy; Grand Sontiuul, Mrs. May. St Louis. A NKGKO'S UltLHK. and Murder ou ormerly in the of Heary A. '23. special from Mt Holly, N. J gives the details a desperate robbery and attempted murder which was eoauui'tod in Bur- lington County Tuesday night. Louis Golstine, of New York City, was on his way from New York to Burlington to visit a friend. He got olT tho train by mistake before ho reached Burlington, and, no other train leaving in a season- able time, ho started to walk. Soon after starting on his journey he was overtaken by a colored man, who en- jaged Golstine in conversation as tba two walked alone? together. While passing through a strip of woods tho negro demanded his ruonoy. This Ooldstino refused and tho negro shot him in tho mouth. Another shot en- tered Goldstino's hoad. Tho negro then secured the prostrate man's watch and purse, which contained about 845, and fled. Some farmers found the wounded m.ui and brought him to a hospital here. DEADLY JSNMITY. While n Tlialr Moth- er's Now York Man it Aft4nulteJ by H t Hrothcr. N. Y., Oct. A most aff.iir is reported from the Tillage' of PenHeld, noar here. Mrs. Delia Thomas died last Saturday aud bor funeral took place Tuesday. She left two sons behind 'nor, who havo for years been enemies. During tho funeral services "one of tho sons, Alpheus, was assaulted by bis brother George whilo the former was taking a last look at bis mother's remains. Tbe weapon, usod was a heavy cane, and severe injuries were indicted before tho horrified spec- tators could disarm tho would-be assas- sin. A warrant has boon issued for tho arrest of George Thomas. rtoatRii to Henth Trumiw. DKSPLAI.N'EO, 111., Oct Matthew Brazell, a well-known resident of this place, was beaton to derxth Tuesday night. A neighbor passing Brazoll's residence was attracted by tho sound ol groans noar tbo 1 arn. Flo found Brazell lying bleeding on tho barn floor, his bend crushed almost beyond recognition. He rallied enough to muttor: "Tramps and died soon aftor assist- ance arrived. He been robbed of in bis pocket. PlTTSTjfnoif, Oct. Frank Vf. Hall, who claims to bo from Easton, Pa., waa arrested here Wednesday as a suspicious character. Ite tables exactly with tha and description of Walter E. Ifuey, a member of the harbor commis- sion of San Francisco, who is wantc-l in tho latter city for S20.00') of public money. Hall was sentenced to thirty days to the workhouse and in tho meantime bis case will be investigated. Putifripft by u fnlUn'on. JiAi.TiMoiiE, Oct. 23. The Bay Lino steamer Virginia, which in July last crashed into tho Louise and caused a loss of fourloon lives, was in it collision yesterday with the tug Volunteer. The Volunteer was towing five oyster pun- gies. one of which sunk, and the others, as well as the tug itself, moro or loss in- jured. Several men wero thrown into the water, but were rescued by tho Vir- ginia's crow. The loss will roach OF THE It-vis from Various Sections liuckeyedoiu. rom Hoik. Oct. Tho British ship Fearnaught, from St John, N. B., Sep- tember 25, became waterlogged and was abandoned in mid-ocean. Tbe British stoaraer Engineer rescued eleven of her crew of eighteen and was obliged stand by four days in order to rescue seven others who remained on board the abandoned hulk and could not be reached. All were saved, HILL AND WAUWICK Adilrex a Demuorattc 0., Oct Demo- cratic mass meeting hero yesterday, ad- dressed by Governor Hill, of New York. was attended by about five thousand people A much larger attendance was anticipated by tho Democrats, who made a big effort to get out a largo crowd. It is claimed that circulars wore distributed Tuesday night by Republicans in which it was stated that Governors Hill and Campbell would not bo present. Delega- tions accompanied by bands were pres- ent from Mansfield, Loudonvillo and Massillon. A procession was formed and a parade made through tho princi- pal streets of tho city, during which Governor Hill and candidate received considerable attention. A hand- somely decorated stand on the public square WAS surrounded by an audience of about people when Hon. L. tv. Crltchflold introduced Governor Hill. The Governor madoan address of alittlo more than an hour's duration, in sub- stance the same as that which ho doliv- cred in Canton Tuesday evening. He was at times loudly applauded. Chairman Critchfiold read a telegram from Governor Campbell in which ho re- gretted his inability to bo present and asked that hiscomplimentsbe presented to Governor Hill. Mr. Critchfield was interrupted by loud calls for Mr. War- wick. Ho was compelled to stop after several attempts, when Mr. Warwick came forward and after an enthusiastic reception made a short speech in which he expressed tho utmost confidence that he would defeat McKinley. These remarks wero very loudly ap- plauded, the Democrats professing to bo doiightod with his theme, as it had been Baid of him that ho could not make a speech and was therefore not fit for a Congressman. Another mnetlng wus held in tho Oocra Bouse last night, where Governor Hill and li-cal orators made addresses to a crowded house. DEFEATED IN THIS HOUSK. Original CompromUo 11111 with Aiufiul- Gets k lilttrte K.T" In tho Lower Brunch of tho COI.UMDOP, Oct. The Senate, after approving tho journal and hearing weveral local bille rei'd tho scconJ time, to three p m. At the latf r hour recess of an hour WHS tftkrn nnd at four o'clook tho Sennto adjourned until to-morrow. Houso met at this aftcnioon. Just prior to the sewrton the Democratic mem- bers held n whoa tho Il.uu'lton Cmmiy flclegatio proposed to take up ami vote (or what IP known tho orticlnn! cnmpromi-B MM. giving the Governor arbur.irv po vor u> n-inovo mcmters o( tuo Cincinnati Board of Public Im- provements, which passed the Scnntij week and wng defeated in tbe Hous" A motion was adoolcd rclc.iHlny the momhc rs from LUo caucus dVcreo of yosU'rday by which thoy were bound to Voto for tho modltleJ couipnmlfiu bl.l. Afterwards the cuucuil to tha orljfinal compromise bill, but of thu mem- bers refused to be bound by this and left tho hall. Immediately upon tlie House being cilled to order a cn'l was and OT members answered tothotr nanr-s A motion to go out from under the call was voted to ullow time to In the absentees. Mr Monnol. of Stark, who hcen riWm from 'he Ilouao fOJ several soon utter arrived and pro- ceedlriKi under the cull worn dl.spon.iod with. Mr. lh--n asxcd to Introduce ft bill. Objections wr-re :md thiblll wan shutout. It provl led fo" pnymunt of m to meiubert for th'- extnionllnary session Mr. Oisypr inn. ed a refousiilura- tioti of the vote by-A-tjicti Mr f.icMakcn's sub Stttute for thu original romiirui'ilsu bl'l was adoptnl, Th'-subituutc proviJ-d for the abo- iltion of the jintent P.onrd of Public Improve- ments urn! a board of four, to bo appointed by tbn triist'-cs of tho sinlelnt' fund. The motion to n'conaiiler was lost by a vote of f> yeas to W nays, .v.nsois Forbes, Gllliland, TTngeny. Pein-lliind McMalton. Dcm- Ocrnts. votlnt? with the Rcpiiblicarifi !n the negative. A motion to ostf.uuc tui Lhor con- sideration tomorrow was then uufuiitcd Sind the b'll put on it-< The bill HI, nuya  iu  :jo Cr "bin flfty cents to any point, and to somo points it w-.ll bo The n-'r. aso will apply to business from v '.'Tior points to the seaboard, as well :iS tho Opposito dir-vt' Tho --I1 ents of taritl il'ip.irtmon's oC dif- ferent expre.xs ri'fn priii will >f. in Chicago on Tliursii.-.y of to arrange tho new rates. a'% '.T..- in rates is tnri'lo on aivotri: of t ir> e.xpeut-v'S o' till" companion. r-'1, ov. inyto tho D.iyii: MI u-ia.irc-d by tho railroads for r GHASTLY Clews Co., bankers, who Wre arrest I a short time aeo. charged with tbe tceft Pcliett called at the house of about Si. MO worth of possa-e staraps, i of farmer lir- ing near here, and assced for a drink of catne np yesterday at tho Tombs co-jrt. Bnrtis, wbo was superintendent of the mailing department confessed and was held for trial. Hoag was discharged, A Munificent Oifl. ITHACA. N. T.. Oct the ts  lUtlo follow WHS sutTc'rmjr horribly Thu r.oicrot-s in -.'t I'.'. hnvn been arrested nn.l will be tried 113 being parties to tho cri'nps. Jithngnii'A 8or C. H., Va., Goorgo .lohnson, a nc-rro quarrolcd with his tnn'ucr murdered her a hop. her flvo times on tli'-. chopping hur skull. Trr- troublo camo about whon tho old woTinn to her son paying utto n t.ion to a girl hi3 mother "Aid -not, -wi'.'ii, him tj marry. .Johnson's brutality u.xs nrousp-l tho pn- tiro neighborhood, as this is hu snr-on-1 murder, ho haTlnp killed ststct about months ago and eucapC'l justice bcciiubo there was not evidence ououg-h to convict A Clone Cull. PAHK-I-URJHIUO, W. Vn., Oct. J. W. McCoy, of tho shoo firm of Dronnnn McCoy, whilo crossing tho pontoon bridge ovor tbo Kanawha river Monday night, drovo oil into tbo rivor. AVbun ho came to tho surface he wan be- tween tho dashboard and tho hof.se, tho latter, in trying to extricate him- self, kicked .McCoy several Mc- Coy finally tiianaiiod to (fot, av-xy fror-i the borhO. which sank and was drowtioX McCoy was rescued almost dnad. Train filial Work KANSAS CTTV, Oct. A freight train oti tbo Chicago, Milwaukee it T'aul road was wrcokud Tuesday on a trrstlo forty foot high, sior Sprintr.s and Mosloy, by unknown villains. Tla- Qroman. John ol Cincinnati, was instantly killed. The rails had been loosened an 1 tho ondj pried apart with a crowbar, which waj fastened between the ends so aa to pro- vent Lboir slipping back A C Jurlcnl Lothiirln in Jail. HOU.AMI, Mich., Oct. l'.'.-v. John Kostor, paHtor of a non-sectarian cburcb horo, is now in jai 1 at Grand charged with alienating tbo affections of Mrs. John Lint from her husband. Mrs. Lint is a mfjmbcr of Koster's cburch, and the arrobt uas cuusod a bitf sunoation. Lint arid ?uit is tbo yf Kootbr'.i ia- carcoration. lrrl on lfi K CITY, Mo., Oct. Joseph Anderson, a printor, shot himself in his room Tuosdar, tho bullet passing throujrh his head and causing- instant death. Ho was to have married Miss JScrtba Cloud, of Decatur, 111., Tuesday evening. Miss Cloud hero ready for the ceremony and is now prostrated with griof. No causo can assigned for the suicide. Klch Old Will ftrnken. MADISON, Wis., Oct A few years Peter Dean, a rich o d bachelor, dind in S'iporior. leaving a will vhic'j sot aside land in that city :el at S2CO.OOO for park purposes. Flis relatives rnado a contest and the Circuit .Tiidjr" "f that circnit has declared it void, as cre- ating nnlawf-jl perpetuity and for uncer- tainty. Tbe will V> the Supreme Court With m Street C.ir- Oct A hone atUched tt a colliacd a Street car last evening-, throwing occnpants. W. R. Coon and P. P. W-xvt- ward, asjainst the car and probablr Ully injuring them. The driv-r of car. was sororcly ir.- jnnsd. Tbe horse killcd. YOHH. Oct The of ttrc works, owned bj A. R Company. Mid iMt evening. M9; pwUally WM 1 wwrt of   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication