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Salem Daily News: Saturday, October 11, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 11, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. OHIO. SATURDAY, OCTOBER II. 18W. TWO CENTS. STILL ON TAUUED ANI> Harrison'a Trip Tlirough tha Western Country. ami Topeka, Kan.. TUited aiid tbe Usunl Ovations Given. Reroptloa of the j Alonx the Ila.t Cltr. ATCHISOX. Kan.. Oct Fri- j moved to_the Sixteenth precinct station day morning tho A Oilier rind In the of Hrooklyn V A Kvmftrkitblo About ConP.iotlntt NEW YOKK. Oct Pryoi was four.d tarred and feathered in the streets of Brooklyn Friday morning. The man was partially undressed, his shirt being torn off so that his body j from the waist to the shoulders was ex- posed. The portion of the body exposed to view was covered with a thick layer of tar, which had been liberally sprink- led with feathers. The r-.ian was re- JCJ1PED TOM BAIL to America. Intense Excitement Created in land Ireland by Thfir Action. President's train entered tbe station at St. Joseph, a cVcerins: crowd Mr. He entered tbe depot hotel r-.ru! was takea up-stair.s to tho balony of tha hotel, which had been beautifu'.ly draped and adorned with flowers. His appearance on the balcony was greetel house. The odor of chloroform was de- tected and it was learncv.l that ho had been under tho influence, of that drug. When he recovered consciousness ho told tho story o' his adventures: "Ihad boon over to Harrv Miner's theater dur- ing the evening, and when the perform- ance was finished I for arhoai'1 with prolonged cheering. Colonel Dawes i in Brooklyn. I crossed tho ferry and introduced the PresiJr-nt to the crowd j started up Berry street. Whilo on that filled the streets for fullv a street I met two men, one of whom square. The President mado a short 1 caught hold of Tho other placed a address. At the conclusion of tbo speech j Sponge over my face and I became un- Mr. Harrison was taken to the waiti; room of tho hotel, where an inforr.Kil re- ception was held. The President shoo'.c hands with fully one 1 people. TOI-KKA. Kan., Oct Presi- dent was welcomed at Atchison by tho mavor of the city. A great crowd h.i-l gathered in tbo railroad station and ic cheored and as tho train moved slowly up the track, where tha President was greeted by a delej.itioa of school children. Mr. Harrison mad3 a brief address. The Topeka railroal Station was packed with people when the train came in. The local commit- tee escorted the Presidential party to carriages. The Prc-.ident rode in tho first carriage with Governor Humphreys. In the next carriage were Senator In- galls and Secretary Tracy. The party were driven to tha State House, where the President reviewed the parade of soldiers. From the State Houso they wero driven to the Cooelanl House, where luncheon was served, after which tho President gave a recep- tion to the members of his old brijado, city officials and others. After the re- ception the President went to the fair grounds, where he made an address to tbe old soldiers. From the fair grounds he was driven back to the railroad sta- tion and shortly after tbroo o'clock the President's train left Topoka for Kan- sis City. Lecompton was th'e first station reached after leaving Topoka and tha train slowed up there for a minute while the Projident bowed to a cheering1 crowd. At Lawrence there was another large crowd and tho band from tho Law- rence Indian school, made up of Indian boys, was playing as the train drow up at, the station. Tho President arrived in Kansas City at p. m. An enormous crowd awaited his coming and it was with great difficulty that two companies of tho Third regiment kopt the struggling crowd within reasonable bounds so that the President could got to his carriage. The escort consisted of the local militia which preceded and followed the line of carriages in which the President and his party were seated- The President and Secretary Tracy occupied the first car- riage and its passage through the streets was marked by enthusiastic cheers fro-n the great crowd that filled the side- walks. Arriving at the JSTew Coate? House, the party was escorted to tbo dining room, where dinr.or was served. After dinner the President was driven to the homo of his brother, John Harri- son, where ho spent more than an hour. The 1'resident camo to tbo hotel and. accompanied the party to tha Board of Trade. Tho crowd gathered there wan enormous and tho President was crowded and jostled a great deal as ho went UD the steps. When he reached the head of tbe stairway he was in no condition, to speak, so when assemblage below called for a spr-ech ho said that ho wa3 in no condition for speaking and thanked tho people for tho cordiality o: their reception. The President then stood for half an hour at the bead of the stairway while the crowd came up one set of steps and shaking hands with him went down theothor stairway. Tho crush was fearful, the heat intense and more than one woman fainted in tho crowd." When tho reception was over tbo party started for St. LOIKS. conscious i knew nor.i.ng m  K to Messrs. Dillon and O'Brien had departed from the err ntry i.-, confirmed. There is little if ativ doubt that their objective point i  uisi- lual. and it Ciuri.Kvir.i.n, di O., Oct. CATTLE. Punic In it by Iho I'ltrt Cltr Vt-ry N. 11., Oct. Tho discovery of tuberculosis in two herds of eattlo near ibis city, and the likeli- hood of a spread of tho disease has caused almost a panic here. Milkmen. are losing their customers by scores and the local sales of beef are perceptibly decreased. Yesterday another herd was found to be infected on the west side of the river, and it, is reported that herds in Goflatown and Bedford are also af- fected. In view of the fact that tho disease can bo communicated to man, much uneasiness exists from the in- mates of the industrial school having used the diseased milk. In nlform .Vrrcatctt. CHKYETCXE. Wyo., Oct. Parkinson is charged with tho killing of Hoy Baker, tho private found dead near tho fort last week with a bullev through his head. The prisoner wan ted the man's money, but this was a  fil- ler's physicians reported his condition as extremely critical. Tbe paralysis of tbo left. ?ido still prevails and ho is un- j conscious, but tbe physical and mental failings noticed during tho Lv-t fow are such as to justif? the most alarming fears for his recovery. Justice Miller was born in Richmond, Ky., April 5. 1810. In IW1 ho was ap- pointed by President Lincoln Associate Justice of tbe Supremo Cor.rt. TSljT Kuls'n SAN FKAXCISCO. Oct best authorities say California will this year pack boxes of raisins. This is about twenty tirrsoi the raisin oiityr.t of ten years apo. All raisin makers will make money this if early rains do riot trouble them. Shipments east have already begun. Bn.MNK.nn. Minn., Oct. started Friday morning in tbe Commer- cial Hotel barn. Owing to a lack of water pressure the firemen could do nothing, and tbe fire spread to r.d join- ing including tno hotel, v.-e-e The loss is Identified thfc WII.MIXOTOX, Dol., coro- ner's jury in the Dupont powder mills j mated at >0 ar.dthe insurance will disaster went to tho works yesterday not exceed and viewed the remains of tbo bo-lies of j to tho six men-John Harrigan. Michel Ilvrle- Oct Croydon, in Sur he, John Hurleho. Martin Doian. .Tamos I rc_ Lord Cahl. WMarrcstcd for xaking Dolan and John Jewell. The remnants I tn-reat- gainst a neighbor. Thursday of their bodies will n.. a basket There is an arm. P. ban 1 aril part of a face. Tbo other pieces are small blackened piece? of Mem- bers of tbe families of the sis r.ave identified as many as S'x separate pieces ho slept ;n in ths police sta> tioa. but on being arraigned !n I yestorday he took up a position at th? f.ylioitor'i taM-j and freely curs'-'d the polico rr-'-gislrate. His is i to be ho'Jf'-'VT. j sentenced to the workhouse by tbe out- leagues tho proposition made by A. W. Thurman was generally discussod. This proposi- tion was to have Iwo major leagues. In the first would b> IJo-ston, Brooklyn, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cleve- land, Columbus and Indianapolis, andiri tbo second Boston, Philadelphia, Balti- more. Washington, Cincinnati. Pitts- burgh, Louisville and St. Louis. The. Association clubs in P.ochestcr, Toledo and Syracuse could go back into tho In- ternational League. In tho nexltwo wooks many prono-uti'ms will bo mado. and thyre is little doubt but that somo satisfactory agrooment will be mado. Tin- Jury PnoviiiNfK. U. I.. jury in the caso of X-.-ttle L. Clarko, charged with for-jinir at tho Mofibanics" savings hank t'nis city, disagreed yesterday, standing ten for acquittal an-1 two for conviction. Miss Clark was admitted to bail in tho sum of and tho Indict- ment against her was continued. Miss Clarke was arrested in New York four months airo, just as she discovered that her faithless lover, to whom she bad sent large sums of money, bad married another woman. Wolf, a Lispe- iabilities Freight to .V.- Oct ii.-Th'-j irn- aad these will be buried to-day. Mmmon-.' llon-I yEw YOP.K. Oct A. Sim- mons, indicted for ai-linj and General Claas-en in wrecking th" Sixth Katiosal Bank, and whose bail of i portan. 01 tbe trunk lino presi- 000 forfeited Thursday br .Tu.Jc-3 i took Place in u'u Benedict on account of failcfe to ap- i yesterday. All tne of :ho pr.ar pioad to the indictment, yes- lines present and tc terdaT before Coramis.iioner advance rates on eastbotjnd freights Shields. Simmons' bail at S3-V j Tne advanc-i rates will ?o :ato i as soon nav, Cation closes. Hotel. i Awarded 000, which was given. lo Oct Robert Reynolds, I1L, Oct. ft young nian twenty years old. who Matthews, Osicago Jk, Alton came to Chicago frota Kansas City with- nan. -was glrm acainst that in the last few days, himself yes- road for S Hi, 000 Circuit Court yes- terday at the Dearborn Hotel on He knocked o5 a train street- Detpoadbsicy is supposed to an oTerhead at r-crc to ktt Done lip for Qi'O NKW Yoitii, Oct M.-x manufacturer of cloaks at Xo. nard street, has failed, with of more than As his visible as- sets aro said to bo small bis numerous creditors havo been taking all the means within their power to protect themsflv-o. They aro also looking for Wolf, who has disapporod. and not oven bis wife seems to know where ho is. It is supposed that he has cleared out to escape the consequences of his acts. to Court PITTSBCKOH, Oct The appeal fn the caso of the Consolidated Liyht Com- pany (Wost'nghouse) vs. the McKees- port Light Company (Edison) to tbe United Statf-s .Supreme Court has been perfected. Tbe case was decided against the plainti fTs O-tober 5. jS.-'.i. and yes- terday Acheson made th-.- formal I decree dismissing1 thrfj bill. Complain- j ant's attorneys asked the court to allow an appeal, which waw done. to Itfxtn. Oct 11. ElwardCatOJl, a twnty-flve years of age, committed suicide hero last evening in tbe rear of tho White House. He soaeexed bis bead in between the rail- lags of the fence that tho grounds and choked himself to death. Or.L The demands of tbe locomotion engineers of the A. Xortb western railway for an of abolition of the wera jostarday by UentliugbiU federated railway organizations met here Thursday to discuss allairs in con- nection with tho strike against tbo em- ployment on the Houston it Texas Cen- tral railroad of negroes as switchmen. After a consultation with Receiver Dil- lingham, a satisfactory arrangement was reached, the delegation concluding that they could not make the color lino an issue, and the company promising to reinstate all men who struck on account of tho trouble. It tlif- RiriiMoxn. Va., Oct. committee of colored men waited upon tho r.uve.i- nur Thui-.-dav and requested him to or- der the IHe.hmor.d H'jwiUnrs to flro them a i-ahile during eniam-ipaiion cele- bration in this city. The Oev-mor wr-.s somewhat by the reijui'st, and said he would consider tbo matter. Tho is the crank white com- pany of this city and the persons r-oin- r-osing it are in high social .standing. Much stir has been created in military circles by tbe maltor. Tlie KfTcct on 15-irlpv. LoKKi'orr, X. Y.. O'-.t.. n._Tho f-ol- lector of has given our, the ve- s.iilri of tho M'-.Min'.ey bill on Imports. Ho states that he. took in over in duties witbin the last week, and ihct the receipts of ha ley amounted to over bushels. Tho greater part of tbo importation is over, although fully half tho Canadian crop yet remains in Canada. Barley hereabouts has doubled in price arid is bringing eighty cents a bushcL Street Car Mnm Sold to n S Wis..Oct. Tue Belle City Street railway, of this city, has been sold to a New York syndicate for 000. Tbe provisions under which the salo was mado are that tbo present company secures the right to put in an electrio system. If this can bo brought about work will bo pushed at once and the road extended in different directions and improvements will increase the Taiue of tbe plant to 8225. If'f WHITJC PLAINS X. Y.. Oct Cbar-es Adams, whose wife elopr-d with ft Frenchman named last Mon- night, received a from her Thursday dated Calvert House. Bslti- laore. sayin? that she had de- serted and asking to be taken back. 11. Ater, who diol tbo ether nignt of dropsy, was a modern He wni six feet three inc'ies in wi'iglieil .'i0-.'! pounds. His was In proportion to his size. On one occa- sion three men tried unsuecessfully to load a largo stonn into a wnjon, which he lifted in with compnraihv An- other time ho was invited to test his strength upon a lifting machine. Ho refused until p.-ssnred by the that it could not be broken. HP pulled tho machine into pieces without much effort Uor Itivirt "t YnfjrdsTowx, Out. .Tenet Burns has hetrini suit In common pleas court against Robert Pultuoy to rr-cover S10.000 damages. B.irns says that Pultney usked her to marry him in June, 18S8, and tbo day was fixe I for tho fol- lowing- September. H't took a trip aad did not return until November and at his ni.jiiest (.Mat month w.is Ibr-d as tho time for tho marriage. Si ice then he 1. const mlly to ujak3 bor hid wife and she asks for tho above suta to heal her broken heart tl.iy Probfl.ly FtPil.y I YolTXdSToWS. 0., Oct. S01-IOU3 accident occurred Friday morning to a boy named Taylor, aired sixteen years, employed at Brown. P.onnell mill. lie wast Bitting on tbo railing sur- rounding the fly-wh'iel w'.ion It way. preeipitatinLr him into the pit. Hn wus canirbt between tbo rubber belt and tho wheel nn.l whirlc-.l twice around bo- foi-e r.ho civrine could stopped. His right leu and arm wov broken, which, with interTifvl injuries, will proba- bly result fataliy. IMIil y i..r Inrlr u per. MrAicriiuit, O., Oct llay- ney. a photographer, who hal Ir.i tent pitched for go-no tin'- at Bn'en's Mills, by tbo assistance of other partis induced a young and prepossessing named Olive Adams to havo her piclui'o taken in a nude stato. Haynoy wan dj- ingcjuitea lively business .soiling picture.-, when Pi-u-ieculin f Atiorn.'y liudsiin bad the partie.-i inuictod, were arrested and pljijf-J iu jail. CAVTUX, 0., Oct. explosion of pas In an oil lank at tho vrought iron bridge works, T 'irsd.iy fright, fully burned the face and hands of S. Wood. Ho was holding a Il7vit'-il lantern over the edge, of t.'io tank, on- deavorlng to look inside. 
                            

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