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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - October 3, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 234. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3. 1890. TWO CENTS. Cincinnati, Sandusky Cleveland Train Held XJp. Masked Men Perform a Daring Deed Near 0. Mesiserjcer Bound and il mm! the Safe of About l.OOO. TIFFIX, O., Oit. train Xo. 2 on the Cincinnati, Cleveland railroad was pulhag out of Crbana Thursday morninT at three o'clock, two masked men broke into the Adams Ex- press Company's car and presenting re- volvers at the head of Arch L. Scudder, tbo express moison'fsr, dem inde.l his keys. Scuidor siiTendjrsi and was J bound ban'l a-id foot and Tho 1 robbers than riflod Scudier's pocket-3, securin? ST5, his wasch with tho j keys rifled the safe of its csntents about The rrain had reached aj smalltown {West Liberty) by this time, j and the robbers left tho car and W3'c a j position upon the platform. Sc-idder succeeded in calling the attention of the to his condition and was j liberated and the alarm jrivtm. but tho robbers covered tho trainmen with their guns and ordered the train to proofed, j which it did, and just as they reached Bellefontaino the robbers loft the tram and disanpeared in the darkness with tho booty. BET.LKFOXTAIXE, O.. Oct. dar- ing express robbery on the Cincinnati, Sandusky Cleveland road, botwoon Urbana and this city, is causing a great sensation in railroad circles. Tha long immunity from attack by "knights of the road" has caused a feeling of securi- ty to exist which was not warranted by the episode of yesterday raornin s It is understood that no one except the mes- sengers are permitted in the express cars, but this rule is violated every day and access to tho car is as free as to the Smoker. Scudder, the messenger, is an old employe and no blame attaches to him. His doors were locked and the first intimation he had was the cold end of a pistol held at his head, with tho "blood-curdling cry "Throw up The rifling of the safe was short work and by the time the robbers through, Scuduer had regained his voice and began to cry out. At this the masked man place! his revolver at his bead and pulled the trigger, but the gun snapped without exploding the- cart- ridge. The other robber interfered and saved the messenger's life by standing between him and his pal, saying: "We don't .need to kill him." After leaving West'Liberty tho crow, were under the guns of the robbors and could do noth- ing. As the train slacked up just be- fore reaching this city the robbers jumped and fled to the woods. Sjudder saw them jump and fired upon them. They returned the fire with a volley from both revolvers, doing no damage. A reward has been offered for their cap- ture ana a large posse of men are searching for them near this city. party comprises, all told, -02 Work ttf a Vifrliitnce Committee. SPOKAXE FALLS, Wash., Oct. The town of Oakesdale, !40 milos from here, has of late been infested with thugs and cutthroats, whom the authorities were unable to hold in check. Many burg- laries have been committed. Thugs threatened to burn tho town, and good citizens organized for its defense. A vigilance coraniitteo was organized and throe men were ordered to leave town in fifteen minutes. The men Vjft. There is great excitement The town is well guarded to prevent any acts of revenge. Tried to Kill !Ii foraon faith. The girls -.vere separakd iro-n i the other passengers as they iandoJ ar.d i placed in a room by themselves. Threo female missionaries from rnirran: j girl's home i-nong tber': I to convince of tho of -.'.o course they u It Tery hard undcrtakiru. i One of tho girls, Karen Sylv by name, who acfd as spokeswoman for the party, frankly ackn that they were all willing to be oru- oi or eight wives and were fully -xwi-n of the principles o? Mormonism. Tho q-'rls are all young an.l so-.no of them remark- j ably pretty. The attempt of the mis- sionaries to mniipnco them provod aa utter failure, ?.-id as all tho birire office Qu'horitie-5 can do is to uso por- suasion, theon'.iro party will procof d on their joaruev to-day via Newport News, Va. The souls, of whom 3'2 are children. Among the lot is a married English woman who loft her husband in England to take up tho Mormon faith. She said she was called and compelled to go. She rof tisol to tell her name. AN AVALANCHE OiT BILLS. Record of Hoth of Congress Durlnsr tho WASHINGTON', Oct. The records show that bills and joint reso- lutions were introduced in the House during the session just ended, against bills and 233 joint resolutions in- troduced during tho first session of tho Fiftieth Congress. During both sessions of the Fiftieth Congress 13, bills and 209 joint resolutions were introduced in the House. In the Senate bills and 120 joint resolutions were introduced in the first session of the Fifty-first Congress, against bills and US joint resolu- tions for the corresponding session of the Fiftieth Congress. The bills intro- duced in the Senate during tho Fiftieth Congress numbered and the joint resolutions number Rate WHT In the DENVER, Col., Oct The Western trunk lines centering in Denver began the work of retaliation yesterday the Missouri Pacific t cutting rates from Texas points to Chicago and St. Louis. The Rock Island early in the day announced a round trip rate from Colorado points to Chicago and SL Louis. Tho Rio Grande followed by an- nouncing a half fare rate to St. Louis. The Santa Fe posted a round trip to Chicago of 330.05. A further reduction is expected to bo made to-day. No Trust be Fc.rme'l. CHICAGO. Oct The Western straw wrapping paper manufacturers of the district west of tho Allegheny Moun- tains held a secret meeting here at which seventy-two mills, with a total output of 300 tons, were represented. President Castle denied that a trust was about to be formed. Tho object of the Declaration of Vv7a.r by tho York Central. MenibT of the Knights of Labor Shall b? Employed on That RoatU Vice an Order Di- recting SIo.i U of to 3fake ThU Oec'.-Usii Known. Y....-C. Oct. New York Central have decided that no more Knight e: Labor shall bo em- ployol oa fl and yesterday Vice PrPhidoat iiVv'.ed a circular direct- ins" the of the various depart- pared lnu performances of th fifteen to make thiur decision known. I o BLA.ST FOUXACES. Ir n and stool InttUttte In DiscosslQf NKW YOKK. Oct. sea- of the British Iron and Steel In- stitute was not so well atwmded as was that of Wednesday. Tho discussion ol the paper read by Mr. Gayley on "Blast Furnaces" was tho first thing on programme. [lurr Thiolen, ol tho Ger- man delegation, compared tho manner of charging and running blast furnaces iu Germany with that practiced In the United States. Windsor Richard argued against tho practice of running blast furnaces at the extreme high rate of speed DOW in proyr-.'Ss. E. E. Potter, of Chicago, gave an extondod account of the work of tho blast furnaces of tho Illinois Steel Company and of several blast uirnacos uoar Chicago and coin- Chronicle of Late Events Obioaus. Among AN I Tho circular is addressed to tho general manager,  .to that thoy I quit work from fear of personal violence and did not dare to oilor to resume work. for the same reason, the manage- ment of the company to announce that it objects to its omployos being mem- bers of tho organization known as Knights of Labor. "Tho management is satisfied that membership in this particular organiza- tion is inconsistent with faithful and efficient-, service to tho company and liable at any time to prevent it from properly discharging ita duties to the public. You will at once take such ac- tion as will bring this circular to the at- tention of the employes in your respec- tive departments." General Superintendent Voorhees said that tho circular moans precisely what it must either give up their membership in the order or leave the road. DAMAGES AWAilDED Rich Hiltlmore Goiitrnator Mutated by Jnrj for Alienating Wlfe'w BALTIMOHF. Oct. The jury in the :ase of John Si-jbrocht vs. William H. 2vans for 875.000 damages for the al- esred alienation of tho affections of frs. Wilhelmina Siebroeht. now Mrs. Ivans, presented a scaled verdict Wed- nesday night which was road in court esterday. It pivos tho plaintiff )00 damages. The testimony presented 5V the plaintiff was- to' tho -effect that vans, after gaining the affections of urs. Siobivchi, -ooun-iolied the securing of a divorce from her husband because of family dissensions, while at the same time advising Stebrecht to let the case go by default. Siebrecht did not ap- preciate the true condition until after ;he divorce was granted and Evans im- mediately married Mra. Siebrecht. Evans is a very rich contractor and will probably appeal the case. KDilMJttt. meeting was to devise moans LO reduce the expense of the production of wrap- ping paper._______________ Should Keen WII.MIXC.TOX, Del., Oct. 5. Grade Clark, the ten-year-old daughter of Thomas T. Clark, was assaulted while she was playing in her father's barn near New Castle, by Jacob Starkor, a negro. .Starker was captuivd and had to ho taken secretly to the jail, owing to throats mado against bi'n. lie was coirmitted to jail without bail. Deposed Hiothe- Kr.jni rotter. Loxnox. revolution in tho State of Mnnipur. in Northeastern India, has no significance boyond Iocs discontent. dfpon-d Maharajah made himself obnoxious by extrava gancc and excessive exactions and hi. brother found no di'r.culty in orjauiz ing a successful conspiracy for bis throw.________ Dpmxr.iU of t'nlonUts. Losnox. Oct. The Xat''onal Ga Workers' Union has demanded that th London daslirhi and COKB Cornpan shall emnloy only union men. A dcputa tion will call upon tho corap.iny's oifi cer3 to-day to receive their response to the demand. The company has a capi- tal of 500.000.000 and employs 11.000 men.______________ ST. Oct. uni- rersitv has been reopened after having been closed six months on account of sedition the students. It is re- ported that the students renewed the agitation ar.d fourteen of of- fenders were arrested and imprisoned. Civil furnnces of the Il'tnou Stool Company A-ith those of the Edgar Thomao.! works, oi Pittsburir.-i. Sir Jatuos Kittson then presented lion. Abraham S. nowitt with the Bes- semer zol.l modal lor his distinguished j services to the iron and st--ol trido. and also with tlio framed dlplo'ii i c.irtifyin j to his enroll mo nt among those who had received tho  e is tb'- st Still- The cAsdJtJos oa whlcb liV eralion is zra-sv---! if- ibat is to ihe forever.  or. PlEKUE, S. P., Oct. from the Sioux silcnc tbo river state Uu-.t iur..'.'io i1. f. >rof the Indifti over thaoxpi-o'o! o> their Mostlah is In- cantations and reiigious goincr and an aged uioui -ino o.i'.k'A lied Shirt, whose ngo is said to i o ovi'-.- 100, leads tho program-a c Startling features of worship- peottd he will soon develop -o tho lookod-for Saviour, as hi.- -'i among tho rodbki-is sooms to But this is only spuculaik''. i' -J are perfectly but do to have whites intprlt-re or got t -o i-'os-i to thoir nict'ting places. Tl'.1 -1- tribes will have nothin r to do wir'i now fad and frequently LO -v 1 their wilder neighbors to fioai their practices, but with no iivuil. A CLEAN from U Huv  P mato of tho vote of Maho County give's a Ropnblu-.xn on the ent-re btato ticket. i.- turns show tho Kc-pubiU-an ticl 'i majority of SOO. In ttoiso Count'- "Q- turns from four precincts ft'.vr1 for Congross. VI Tl.o same precincts Hawiey dolpgcto in 1SSS, '20 tnajo'-ity. Inci-nip'iote returns from fivn counties give (Rop.) tor Cougtvas >.vi ma- jority. Moairro roturns ind'u-au- that the Logialature will stand SO Ucrubli- esns and 2-2 Democrats. The Ut> mi oil- cans claim tho State by m.vority. Tho Democrats concede the Stai-1 to tho Republicans by SOO majority. 'Tho re- turns show largo gains for the llopubli- cans over tho vote of 1SS8. the same. Accept tho O., Oct. The Enance committee of tho City Council was thrown into consternation Wednesday night by tho refusal of Jacob Krick, local representative of Seasongood, Meyer fc Co., of Cincinnati, to accept worth of street improvement bonds sold to thorn two weeks ago. They claim the bonds wore not legally issued. _ _ _ IIU Trip Ttxi .Mucli for McCoNXKi.-tvii.LK, 0., Oct. Ilarri- SOD Warren, aged eighty-nine yearn, who recently walked and pushed a wheelbarrow all the way to P.altimoro, Md., a distance of over 400 miles, died at bts borne, ten miles from hero. He well when ho returned a few weeks ago, but his death is thought to have re- sulted from his trip. Oct. S.- the wMoTn of Canadiaa statesmen stir- riaf fec-1 with tncir power- ful aeiffbbor am acomat of tbe lej tariff. It te opinioa ia liiat new law U tbe prelude to men to SARATOGA, 3f. Y-, Ocv ton, a tanner mlies oC Saraujgn, abot aai kUkd fcj- afteraooj Mltbm bei- owa bnta. lie ia U- Potnatn Ctitinty Fulr OTTAWA, 0., Oct. The Pu County fair continues to boom. were seven thousand pooplo at tho fair grounds Thursday. Many w.'m exhibits were placed ia the difTcront depart- ments. The entries now number .'J.oOO, the (rroatest number of exhibits ever placed on display at this fair. I'rotmblr Injured. OTTAWA, 0., Oct. John Conine, a young man twenty years old. rid- ing a horso at the fair in a run- ning race In which seven horsos wore engaged, was thrown from his horse. Dis left leg was broken and ho was oth- erwise injured in tbe back, shouldors aidac lie may sot live. Tough Citizen JtiliJ. O., Oct. Jacob Keifer, at Marlboro for murderous as- upon Gbark-s Moore, v.-as arrested Wednciday night by the sheriff. He at- Ucked Moore with a knife, cutting a fMb In hea-1 partially severing arm from his body. Flo was supposed to be In Akron. SAX FIIAXCISCO, Oct tho Steamer China news is received hero of the suicide at tho Grand Hotel in Yoko- hama, Japan, on So ptouibor -4 of Leonard Tobias, said to bo of New York, who shot himself -in bed. The nc.fc was caused by financial worry and regarding his wife. Tobias whs .x man and his family are said to bo wealthy people In New York. A wit- ness at the inquest said deceased told him ho was worth JiWO.OOO in his own right and that his father wus a tcu- tlmes millionaire. BIIU the Stan. Oct. bills wblch passed both houses failrd'ta be- come laws bor-nise thov did not rocelvo the -rresidcnt's signi'turo. Tl.o mobt Imponant of them is the bill for tho tc- liof of tho assiynocs of John Roadi on a olalm Tor extra allowance on the con- tract for tho machinery of the Unitod States steamer Pooria, amountinjr to Tho bill referred tho claim to the Court of Claims and gave the court jurisdiction in the matter. A CHICAGO, Oct night Theodore f'crstonburg jumped from rho Indian.i stroot bridge into the rivi-r. Bridge tender McGraw jumped in alter him and a fierce struggle ensucl, Mc- Graw trying to rescue tho would-bo sui- cide and tho latter fighting against res- cue, xvhilo a crowd gathered on tno bridge and looked on at tho tragedy. Finally Forstenburg broko away aud sank rise no more alive. Three Lott at a OruMluif MASKIXO.VOK, Quo., Oot Mrs. Dostalor, wifoof Dr. Dost.uo., of this place, was driving across the Cana- dian Pacific tracks Wednesday ovoning in a carriage containing herself Mra. i'iche, Miss Lloroux and two ehikl.-en aged about five years, tho carriage was struck by a freight train and all t'nruo ladles were instantfy killed. Tho chil- dren escaped without injury. Kuthor Far fi-tched. Oct. The Beige b.iys that tho of tic- Kinley tariff bill insures failiiro of tho Chicago World's Fair. It is nooi- less, the paper adds, for Amori'.Miis to expect that Buropo ins will %a U> the ex- pense of making an exhibit on that oc- casion._______________ for 0., Oct. II. Lykin% of Marion County, was nominated by ac- clamation yesterday by the Alliance In- Labor convention, in tho Eighth Coiign-oional .iistrict. Mr. Ly- kins is an ex-lljpublicaa and e Boj 9hnt O., Oct. 3.-By tbe accidental of gnn Wednesday. Perry of Minerra. while boating, was UteUy Hto boy companion, shot, ran to bis Mid found lylog with one band ttM Ude of bU vfn oft- Ot. OCV wblle track run orer and faUlly ..-4 U A fjiinrrel That I In LKHA.VO.V, In I.. Ost. Al lioovor and Lane ronowed an old quarrel on the streets of Joliotville, ton from hero, Wednesday, over SOOQ th-it Lane bad of Hoover's money. After blows bad been exchanged. Lane urovr a revolver and fatally shot Hoover. were prominent business men. Lane was arrested. An PAUK. N. J., Oct. The tie- up of the Adams express at Jersey City wai felt very severely at all the sea coast towns on the lines of tt.e New York Long Branch railroad, over whose lines tbe Adams people control tbe express business. A Show tor New YORK. Oct Marshall Ayres, the assignee of Sawyer. Wallace Co., commission merchants who receaiiy failed, filed schedules yesterday show liabilities of nominal as- gJX447.no and actual Boycott YOKK, Oct. between tbe Brick Manufacturers' As- tbe botrd of walking dele- twiUiiff trades ter i- i- I tarers, tbe board of walking tbe boycott M   

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