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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 30, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 231. SALEM. OHIO, SEPTEMBER 30. 1890. TWO CENTS. MINING ENGINEERS. or the AnrarloM to ScUntUtfc TOP.K, Sept enth meeting of the American Institute of Mining Engineers was called to or- der Monday afternoon in Checkering Ball by President Abram S. Hewitt. Aftor addresses of welcome had been delivered and some little introductory business done, a pacer on ''Explosions from Unknown Causes" was read by J. C- Bayle, of East Orange, N. J. Other papers were road at the afternoon ses- sion. Sept At the evening session N. B. Potter, into certain charges made against of St Louis, read a. pap-T on "The Iron official character r.f Mr. Wheat, the j Mountain W. F. Durfee, of Investigation of a Washington Official's Conduct. The Postmaster of the House of Rep- resentatives is Now Under Fire. Qneer and Shmdy Are to Light During Taking of His Daughter's Heirs Appear In Court And Ask That a Legacy Now Amonnt- ing to SoOO.OOO be Divided Them. i History of of I V.'lll TVhosa be Totiul the of j Sopt. la the Or- j phans' Court M..at'.ay a petition was I filed by the h-.-.ra of Benjamin Franklin 1 prayin? that the sum of i hold by the board of city trusts and knoivu as tho "Franklin b9 postmaster of the House of Ropresenta- Blrdsboro, Pa., read a paper on "Amcri- tives, took place Monday by the House can and Foreign Practice with tho Dia- Cominiuee on Accounts. Representative i mond Drill." Caswell, representing Mr. Wheat, called j The meetings that yesterday turncd ovo- tu them. tno yroucd for the the atAntion of the committee to the promise to be the notable from a act for making- appropriations for the scientific point of viow of any that have House post-office and contended that the been held in this institute. These first phraseology of the act gave the post- sessions will rr.er.re into sjusi-qui-nt jaastor the absolute right to use the meetings of tho Iron and Stoel lasti- whole amount appropriated for tute of Great Britain and Ireland arid carrying the mails. The phraseology of the Verein Deutscher Eisenhuttenleiite, the act had been changed a few years of the Gorman Empire, and vill be con- ajo so the postmaster allowed to tinued in conjunction with thc-in ou claim that the provisions of Fran'-cUu's will :iro in violation of th.9 law and thfrcfora void. Under tho will, probated in 1790, Benj.amin Franklin bequcathoil in trust tJ the citios of Thi'.aiulp' in- nd P-j-iton each the sum A DAY IN GONGK Deficiency Appropriation Bill Passed by Both French Spoliation Claims Featnw of the Bill Fails to Go Through. MADS A MISTAKE. messages, each mosque (oxcopt those of unimportant naval and army promo- tions) representing a single nomination, All these had been acted upon at five o'clock Monday, except Ton of these were received yesterday afternoon from the President Only two nominations have been re- jected at this of J. B. Eaves, collector of internal revenue lor the Fifth district of North Carolina, and H. H. Schrock, postmaster at Selin's Grove, Pa. Several nominations will doubtlessly be loft hanging when the Senate adjourns. The I'lOaidont has withdrawn thirty-nine nominations dur- ing the session, but the withdrawals were due to clerical errors in tho mes- sages or deaths of nominees. PRISON CUSGiiESS. uso the whole sum, or "so much as a ay Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in be necessary." Chickering Hall aad at Pittsburgh on Representative Spooner, the chaV- October 0 and 10. TTiin of the committee, submitted a Ttatement made by the clerk of the EXECUTIVE SOMIXATIOXS. Douse to show that the full sum had necord of Thin of the Senate Ffc- beon appropriated annually since the Presidential Forty-third Congress. Mr. Dalton, who WASHINGTON, Sept Senate was postmaster of the House during- the has almost cleared up the executive Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth and Fiftieth business which has come before it dur- Congrosses, testified that he had not con-1 ing the present session of Congress. It sidored anv of the as a perquisite has received earing the session for "ranting the contract He had found that the contract could not be thorough- ly carried out for less than the full ap- propriation and he had given the con- tract for to Mr. Culbertson, who was his father-in-law. He bad ad- vanced about to Mr. Culbertson to purchase the horses and wagons to carry out the contract William E. Bradley testified that he had been sworn in as a messenger in the Bouse post-office in March last, but had never done any work there. Mr. Wheat's Bon had asked him if wanted to make a few dollars by being sworn In as a messenger in the House post-office to serve for a few days until a man from Dakota could arrive to take his placo. The vacancy was caused by tho dis- charge of an employe named Denny. Young Wheat agreed to give him 85 for serving for the few days, fle served for three weeks and drew 86T, which he turned over to young Wheat with the exception of 85. Wheat had secured him an Indorsement on an application for a Government position as a further re- ward for his services. Walter Wheat came to him again and asked him to represent a man named Frank Hall in tho post- office and he had agreed to do so. He drew for representing Hall. He asked Walter "Wheat to divide the money, but he refused to do so and in the presence of Postmaster Wheat they compromised on 810. The postmaster Said something about having Mr. Cas- well withdraw bis indorsement if he in- sisted on having the money divided. The witness had been discharged from tho post-office, the reason given being that tho propriety of having a substi- tute in the otoce had been questioned. W. D. Catlett. a folder in tha House folding room, testified that he had been an employe in the House post-office. Mr. Culbertaon, the mail contractor, had given him a general idea about bow the mail contract was carried on and the witness had talked about it Mr. Wheat Sent for him and asked him about the stories he had started about the con- tract Mr. Wbeat was vary and wanted to know if tho witness hacl given information about the contract to mem- bers of Congress ani newspaper report- ers. Tho witness expected to be dis- charged at once from tho office, but this was not done. Ho was transferred to the folding room. .1. E. Haven, another employo, testi- fied that Mr. Wheat had boon sovero on him and that Mr. Culbortson had told him that Wheat did not allow money enough for the contract Mr. Culbort- Eon, the witness said, had told him th at he paid Mr. Wheat over 5709 and aftor the publication of this fact in the news- sapors Walter Wheat had come to his room and bDggod Culbertson, on his knees, to take back the rroney and band It over to a third party, naming James Fisher. of 10 ho I loans at p i riocl iff iirr .jd in tho form of to "mar- not ovor the aco Wholesale In Convention, Sept annual convention of the -atlonal Wholesale Druggists' Association opened here last night More than 300 delegates are present The Proprietary Association, separate organization, many members of which are members of tho Druggists' Association, are 1c session. The real work of tbo meeting will begin to- day. The recetine will last until Fri- of Intemperance and Crime Dli- by Noted CTSCIXKATI. Sept. features >f the proceed ngs of the prison con- gress yesterday were the addresses of Warden Brush, of Sinir Sing, and Com- missioner Harris. The latter had in- vestigated the causes of the now well recognized fact that crime increases with education, and his conclusion was that arrests for intemperance, brought ibout by the zeal of tho Prohibitionists, had swelled the total of offunses. Warden Brush said that a largo share of the men and boys who are incarcer- ated in our prisons and penitentiaries are there because they had no proper discipline in the family and were al- lowed by over-indulgence to play tru- ant, instead of attending school, and therefore received no school discipline. "When I have been askod what are the cause's that send most of our men to prison I have of late years invariably answered: 'Tne want of family disci- pline.' _______________ Murdered In Strewt Urawl. LOOA.NSPOUT, Ind., Sept. a street fight at Walton, eight miles south of Logansport. between Martin fer, sixty years old, and Ed'.vard Lowry, aged twenty-five, Saturday, SchaefTer picked ut> a stone and struck Lowry on the head, knocking him do.vn, Ho theu jumped on his victim and b -at hitn un- mercifully until taken away by bystand- ers. Lowrv was rcrnovod to his homo whore be lingered in agony until Mon- day morning, when he died from tho effects of his injuries. Toe murderer disappeared shortly after the and 13 still at large.____________ U.Htenlnp to by Telephone. LOXIJOS, Sept. idea sug- gested by Bellamy in "Looking Back- ward" of listening to sorrnotig by tele- phono, has been put Into practice at Bir- mingham. Christ church in that city was connected by telephone Sunday with a lartro number of houses whose oc- cupants were able to plain.y hear the entire service while taking their ease at home. Tho ment was satisfactory to the auditors, >ut has aroused tho ap- position of most of the clergymen and other church officials, who regard the new departure as sacrilege. Great hut It Didn't WorX. MABIOX, Ind., Sept- SO. midnight Sunday night the prisoners in tho coun- ty Jail set fire to their mattresses. The nitrht watch discovered smoke issuing from the windows and gave the alarm. The fire was extinguished after several i of twenty-five, to assist thorn in estao- I lishmg themselves in business. Franklin bad in viow tho accumula- tion of a Itrgo fund for tho purpose specified in his will at tho expiration of the period of the remainder to be reinvested for another 100 years, the same provisions applying to Boston and Philadelphia. The first period of 100 years elapsed, the city of Boston has swollen the nucleus of tho bequest to about but the Phil- adelphia fund has only reached S100.000. The objfci of tho suit is to compel the distribution of this fund to the heirs of Franklin, descended tnrougli his only daughter, Sarah Franklin "Rscho. It is estimated that there are over fifty of thoso heirs in this city and vicinity. The contest Is based on several grounds, is known as the rule of perpetuities In common law. The law does not provide for the vesting of a legacy beyond the period of twenty- one years aflor the lifetime of the lega- tee, crcopt funds devoted to charity, ft is distinctly claimed that Franklin's plan did not contemplate charity, from tho fact tnat interest was charged on tho loans. The suit Is to be decided in this city before steps taken to se- cure tho fund hold in Boston, but notice has been served upon the trustees of the Boston fund to prevent any disburse- ment of it pending litigation. Conference Report on the Tariff BIH Fro. to the and a Vote May bo Keactied T -Oar. WASHINGTON, Sept. SO. Housr In house yesterday. Mr. Taylor, of Ohio, moved noa-conourreuce in Seuatc amendments to the Mil to define and regulate tho juris liction of United States courts. After discussion the bill laid aside temporarily. Tho conference re- port en the bill was taken up ana to. A Senate amendment lo the bill granting leave 10 clerks, of 3rst ttml second class post oSlees (extending benefits of the net to of tho mail repair shops) fcfcei! to Senate bill TO remit to the Columbian irou worlcs of B.ii'lmorc. the amount of i-onnUies for !a the of Vic gunboat Pet- rel '.vas jusscd. The conforcnc- report on the bill to increase the e3lcioncy ot the signal co-ps of the   Seu- conferees had yi.-.ded the French spollat.ons amendment because i'f the of th'.' House, but tho subject would uo taken up at another session. The report vras agreed to Tae conference roport on tho turiff bill was then presented nnd read. Mr Morgan dsllvored a lonjj and carefully prepared speech In criticism of the bill. Mr. Morgan hiving, in the course of his re- marks, referred to the reclprocHv section of the as utterly unconstitutional Mr. do- tended the section as one tao principle of which had been rccocnized ifc othor statutes find had been supported by the courts. Mr. Carlisle Mr Morgsn crtjucd that tho section went far be- yond the polut where somewhat similar power could properly be lodged In thu President or any other eiecutlve officer In that-connectloa Mr. Morgan read Mr. Sher- recent letter to Mr. Ernstus Wlman fa- voring reciprocity with Cnnada, and said that he had been looking for tho propos tion which Mr. Sherman In that 1 tter promised to Intro- duce In the Scn.t e. Mr Sherman justified statements In the Wlman 'ettcr, ami that they consistent with the position which he had alvrtvs it was by mutual legisla- tion, not by treaties, thiit reolnrocity could be carried out. He Uad, tho other day, introduced o measure looking to thu r.c'loa of eongress in that bill making duty free from Canada, to ttiho edoot when Caa- Dda. by ailmllar law, admitted coal from the United States free. The conference report wna then laid aside without nctton. The concurrent resolution for tho flual adjournment to-daj referred to the Finance Committee. After n short executive se'iton the Senate adjourned. Mr. Aldrich stated that ho would not ask fornn evening session, as he wan fled that a vote on tho tariff conference report would be reached to-duy. Canadlnn OfT.rlulo Clulm that of AmrrleBU FULIui Schooner WM Unauthorized. OTTAWA, Ont, Sept From what ;an be gathered in official circles hero the captain of the government cruiser Dritic has made a serious mistake in jeizing the American fishing schooner Dary Crockett at Surls, P. E. I. The commanders of Canadian wero to avoid making seizures un- less under exceptional circumstances. [t was tho wish of the Dominion govern- ment that every cause that might raise dispute over the Atlantic fisheries should be avoided this year whilo cho Behring Sea question was in tho bal- ance. The captain of the Critic has been requested to explain his action at once and if there is a possible chance of clearing the schooner it will bo douo. ANARCHISTS VS. HGBRI5WS. Big How from the llarantup of n of lleri- Mnny Arrests Sopt There was tho bigffpst kind of a row Sunday ntjrht at tho joint rnoetinjr of the Polish Anarch- ists and tho orthodox. ITcV.rows of this :ity. There wero fully people at tho ineeunrr, tho orthodox Hebrews bo- Ing Inrffoly in thu majority. An im- mense crowd alhercd boforo the hall, attracted by tbo uoiso within. Sovornl of the orthodox llobrews defended their faith, when Michael Cohen, an Anarch- ist who had only been in this country four months, denounced religion and tho Arourican Government in tho sever- est terms. Then rnsui'd a bitter fight, the crios boing hi-nrd squares away. Some KecontDotnssintlio eye Stale. BIKCH SWING. Ben weir A Convicted of Murder In list Doftrao ;ia'i 'Sontencod to be WOODSTOCK, Ont., Sept. jury in the Bivchall murder trial, at last night returned a verdict of murder in the first dogreo. As soon as the arrived the jury was asked if they bad upon a verdict and replied, "Wo have." is your asked Judge McMahon. "Guilty." the foreman replied. When asked if he had anything to say why sentence shonld not be passed upon him, Birchall replied: "Simply, I am not guilty of murder." The then said: "I fully concur with the vSrdtct of the and pro- ceeded to pronounce sentence, which was that Birchall bo taken to the jail and bftwcjon the hours of a. m. and six p. m. Friday, the 14th day of November, bo ri.ingod by the neck utuil dead. .V Th hrr, m Collision and CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES by (.emgne, and Broth- Clalw. FoUowinjf.are the scores of I.EAGITE. At 0, Chicaffo 8. At 6, Cleveland 6. At 0, Pitts- burgh 2. At York 4, Cincin- nati 5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. At 2, Columbus 5. At 1, Louisville 6. PI.AYEHS' LKAOUB. At T. Chicago At 4, Buffalo 7. At York 3, Cleveland At I, Pitts- burgh 8. ___ Tho police finally raided the hall and made many arrests. WAStnsoTojr, Sopt. The depar- ture of Superintendent ot Census Porter for Europe Saturday, gave rise to the bothersome question as to who should act as superintendent of the bureau dur- ing bis absence. There Is no Assistant Superintendent of CenHtm and the cen- sus law makes no provision for tho superintendent's absence. Secretary Noble found a statute that provided that when the head of a bureau was ab- sent his chief clork should perform bla duties- Under this law. which applies to all branches of the Government serv- ice, Chief Clerk Childs will act as super- intendent of the Census Office. In-port GooUn Must Labeled. Sept. Section 0 of the tariff act introduces a new provision which importers of merchandise of all kinds should not overlook.. It- provides that on and after March 1, 1891, "ivll ar- ticles of foreign manufacture, such us are usually or ordlnurily marked, stamped, branded or labeled, and all packages containing such or other im- ported articles shall, respectively, bo plainly marked, stamped, branded or labeled in legible English words so as to indicate the country of their origin, and unless so marked, stamped, branded or labeled they shall not be udmltted to entry." _ ___ President HurrUon Will Ollfornlw, GETTING WARMER. latton CmiMKxl by the ClncUnatt nonru of SUH-lllQB Cixcix.x.vTi, Sept 30. Tho sen-5atioc created by tho demand of Governor Campbell for the resignation of Hon. Lo-uls Reoraelln and the defiant refusal of that official to comply with de- mand is'honrly Increasing. Tho ment is Increased by tho fact ru- mora are noised aljout to the efTm. that charges will be filed against Goorga B. Kerper, of tho Board of Public 1 i j.-ovc- ments by certain members of th-it body, the botntr of a most srri ra- ture. An investigation with this end in riow is boing- carrioil on by tho friciiAf- ot Mr. Roomolin, who decl.irc tl.it :hA7 are alrcadv in po'ssossion of will sturtl" thp community whon ally vrospnted. and lay bare tho allied. conspiracy to down the o: t'j.c board. From further Information thought to bo of sucn importance that ijovornor Campbell will probabiy uu forced to go Into a of tho board, in order to do to -11 parties concornod. It is probable tl.at those cbargoe will be directed at-ainst Mr. K'.-rpt'r, who. tho other niciiiUi-rtf a I- logc-, is at tho bottaui of tho present- trouble. Tho principal rumor than is boing b-.indied about is to tho efTv'. t'ual an effort will bo tnado to show Mr Kor- por up in a bad light in tho matter of the sale ot tho Ida streot bridge ro the city. _ SHOT IN THE Qaorrel Olrl to DAYTOS. 0.. Sopt 90. A shooting af- fair occurred on East Second stror r late Sunday night. In which Charlo- Snohr was shot in the bend by Will Dougherty. The ball entered tho forohfad aborotha none and, pursuing an upward course, imbedded Itself in the skull. IVnh arc boiler ffltxhors, nineteen and f.wonty years old respectively. The shooting- was tho result of a quarrel, in which Spohr'8 girl was tbo disturbing quan lily. Spohr's injuries (ire not rogardod aev fatal, but may aiToot bis mind. D >ugh- erty flod nftor tho shooting ixnd not been captured. Injured by HU Rival. MA8PN. O., Sept Frank Slioon- and Ambrose Fox, two rival piaa- tcrers, got into an altercation tho ol.hor day relative to nome contracts. Tbo lie was pasrtod, and after exchanging blows- WABHIXGT x, Sept. Harrison and soveral 80. President members of his Prrrsnvnr.TT. Sept remains I prisoners had been nearly suffocated, of Williara Noiar., an iron worker, wero The supposition is thai tbo f'.ro "-as found on the Pittsburgh. Ft Wayne  _M4J'WV VAU t t Carson was stracfe t-- isg were thrown across the river- 83.009. E. I., Sept. The of the one hundredth of introduction thi> of cotton tpinaiLir by power, bj Slater, in benn Tote, thir coti i terrible blow oa the head sos. GusVxvss, frora which Suited almost instantly. his eldest Ky.. Sept. 30. bill o' risati was presented to the Kentucky constitctionml contention restsrday for IB rawiacset. oegan Monday. The cotton eestenary exbihir alao opeaei in CeatcMrr Bali tridty nert. tnost ImportMt __ .R. Sep-. of the proniaemt citi- of and Srott Kewwaa, Jr., poTiticiait. were indicted by JelTerson Coaaty yraad jury yester- day tto dty of t.E. Tenn., Sept. A col- lision occurred on the Cincinnati South- ern, a few mllet from Chattanooga, Sunday. Fireman Payne received in- juries from which be died an hour later. A few hours before he had shown to his uncle a roll of bills containing 8SOO. When brought hacV to dead there was found on his person but one dollar and few cents. He could not bare deposited the money anywhere and bis corpse must hare been robbed by a human ghooL A Crmh That Onuml Two Wash., Sept 30. A freight train on the Northern Pacific from Port- land ran into tho roar of tho Pacific mail No 2 at this place Sunday and two men, Jacob Johnson andC. D. Standborg.wcro killed. Tho mail train was standing on tbo main track when tho freight carno round a curve and crashed into It. Tho engineer and fireman of the freight jumped and woro notinjurod. The mon killed were riding on a fiat car at the rear of the freight._________ Crlgpi >'ot for War. PAJIIS, Sept an interview with tho Rome correspondent of Figaro, Pre- mier Crispi denounced tho attitude maintain ed by Franco toward Italy. As an illustration of tho unfriendly policy of Fran ce, the Italian Premier instanced the annexation by that power of Tunis, despite her promises to tho contrary. Signer Crispi declared that there was no danger ot war unless it was sought by France. A Victory for thn TOLEDO, O., Sopt 30. .Tucltro of the common pleas court, decided yen- terday afternoon against tho city of To- ledo in tho injunction proticotling.? to compel the Northwestern Ohio Ci-.a Company to furnish gas at tun conts thousand foot, mtitro measurement. Tlao company risks twelve conts. Tho bi- junutlon is dissolved and a conforouoa between both parties i-i augcjostoO. Thif Is a gro.it victory for tho gas cornpun? and tiio thrcalenc'd gas famine is averted. ______ _ '_ A oa tlio It. O. 0., Sopt. Th') hound limitod on tbo tunore tv, Ohio railroad collided with tho oastbounj ex- press near bore Sunday. two expros-i cars and a mail car WM-O tnolisbed and engineer John rind baxgagpnWor El Miirdock uiti. bad a log broken. Tlio siccidrn'., ;ausod by tho cng-ineor of tht; westr botind train orders. Tho sengers wore badly shaken up. Tall of 3 Nrvr PIULADKLTIIIA, 0., Sopt SO hlprb suspension bridcrf, ;n length, over tho canal, bolonging to tho Deis Kissman Rrutz Ftirtiiturc Coa- pany at Canal Dover, fell with n crash, i Two of tho Gjtcbe. -.vein. An Etfxltw From Sept An extra- ordinary exodus of people from Western Kansas is taking- place on account of crop failure. Tbe rush ie so great that the have agents into the country to work for business. AH who can boy an outfit travel overland, while othen take pasaafw on the rail- roads. Farmers who bare spent from five to twenty tryieg to make a are selling ont and are abandoning claims the roortf a- Boiler ST. Locw, Sept. Tbe well-known Rohan Bros.' Boiler Manufacturing Conv My filed ttotfcM of fof yeeterday altenom. are pendimj whereby they may M LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Sept United States officers raided illicit distilleries in Howard County last week and cap- tured nineteen crooks and three stills. Eonrof the moonshiners were brought to Little Rock and will bo examined before the United States Commissioner. This is the most successful raid ever made in the State. _ An ClftM-TXtr-Old CHARI.KST05. W. Va., Sept At Court House Sunday, George eight yean, shot and killed bis five-year-old sister aho threatened to tell her father of the boy'a disobedience. The boy had frequently he would kill her for telling ot hU wrong for K. Sept Meas- have already been started both in Korth and South Dakota for the relief of settlers who have become desti- tute through the failure of their grate crops. _ BCXTOS. X. D., Sept SOL -Tbe boiler of steam thresher exploded Monday IT, jmlftf. Mllififf Chunond Knatsoo sad Charles Stein. Knntt OMela fcart the other evening, tors, Messrs. Bi 5own with the wreck, and narrowly es- caped with thoir lives, but both waio hurt. Night workmen escaped by run- ning. Loss 51.500._________t few Lexington, KBW O., Sopt 30. -Tbt store rootn of T. W. Wright, merchant tailor, was entered by burglars Sunday. Several suits of clothes and other wear- Ing apparel to the amount of over 510i were taken. The dry goods store of Ed-, ward J. Groely was entered and an ef- fort made to blow opun the safo, but it failed. Wealthy Cntrj. IF.I.D, Sept 30. Frank Urtlra, a younf fanner residing boro. single and worth has gone in- sane. He helioses relatives arc to rob him of a large inheritance. of Stork SrRi50PTitr.D, 0.. Sept G Watson Son, extensive cattle of South Charleston, this co-.jnty. assigned to Colonel E. Cheay. As- sets, fg.000: liabilities. MADISON, St-pt 30.-Tbc warehouse of Snyder's Richvrood tillery at Milwn. Ky.. was bnrr.cd Su.-.- day, toRother with l.-VJO ct whisky, cntailinir loss The property ii. was to> f,   

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