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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 29, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 29, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 230. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 1890. TWO CENTS. Has Been Done During This Session. A Kurober of Important Change in the Laws Especially Those Ka- latiuff to Customs Duties. UTtr ,0d pension JCew Admitted Into the Law. WASHINGTON, Sept 29.-The record of the business of the first session of the'Fifty-first Congress is an Important one- In tlie Senate debate on the tariff bill was brought to an end by an agroe- on the part of members of tbo majority that the Federal Elections bill would not be called up during this ses- S10n The bill therefore goes over. Tbe actual work accomplished by this Congress is of espacial Interest because H is :he first Congress in many years in which one of the two great political parties has had control of both the leg- islative and ex-'Cutive braaches of tbe Government A change in rates of cus- toms duties has practically been brought about, a nurnbar of very important changes in existing laws having been a'creed to in conference and approved by tbe House. They need now only tho approval of the Senate and of the Pres- ident ._ The feature of the new tana law which has attracted wide attention and which bore greater significance from the fact that it threatened for a tim-i to cre- ate a division in the Republican party, was the provision for the establishment of reciprocal relations between the United States and the Latin-American countries. This idea, which had been suggested in past years by Senator Aid- rich and other statesmen, was brought Torv prominently to the notice of Con- gress and the country by a letter of the Secretary of State transmitted to Con- gress by the President, urging the ne- cessity of requiring some concessions from Latin-American countries for the free admission to the United States of sugar and other of their products. The recommenlation was Ignored by the House of Representatives, but was later adopted in a modified form by the Sen- ate and agreed tj in conference between the two houses. Next in importance to the new tariff law. is the silver legislation enacted by Congress. On the 14th of July, 1390, a new law went into effect providing for the issue of coin certificates based on gold or silver bullion, with a require- ment that the Secretary of the Treasury should purchase ounces of silver bullion each month. The bill as it passed the was a practical free coinage bill, but the conferees on tho part of the two" Houses agreed upon a compromise, the general impression be- ing that while the majority in both A POLITICAL 8BN9ATIOX. OoTernor Campbell Asks folr tton of the of tha Clncluuatl Board of Public j CixcrxsATi. Sept. 29.--President Louis j Reemelin, of the Board of Public Im- provements, has been inforiued by Gov- ernor Campbell that his resignation will be accepted. The inform-uion will cre- ate the greatest astonishment in politi- cal circles all over the State. It is said that Governor Campbell has t-.vo more. missives of a like character which he will send to other member? of the board. Messrs. Donham and Montgom- ery are to be the victims. Tho Governor's request yet been complied with. President lin has no present intention of resign- ing. He will fight to the last. The Governor, in a dispatch to Reomelia j Saturday night stated that ho bolievod. him to be a dishonest man. s-vl upon that the demand for the resignation is j based. i TVhether Messrs. Donham and Mont- gomery will also be asked to resign re- taalns to be seen. It is generally he- lieved that such will bo the case, as j they have baen identified with the samo j measures as Reomolin, which have ex- cited the displeasure of the The trio proclaim their innoffT'i and will dispute their positions to the end. Should an investigation ensue they Worst Freight Wreck in on the B. O. Koad. Telegraph Mistake Causes an Awful Catastrophe promise to develop sorao facts that will oreato a sensation never oqaalod in the history of the Queen City. FOUGHT LIKK DEMONS. Battle Kptween Rival Italian Fftctl'-ns In K I'erinijlrauiit Town. HAZELTOX, Pa., Sept. There are two factions of Italians in this city and surrounding country those who belong to a secret order and those who are op- posed to It There is a great of bad blood between them. Saturday night both factions met at a rafllo and late in tbe evening began to fight. Revolvers and stilettos were produced and for a time things looked desperate. They were finally ejected from the hall and bogan to fight on tbe street The non-society men were victorious. One of them while on his way home on the outskirts of town was fired upon from ambush and his body and llmVs riddled with two charges of birdshot. He bad a miraculous escape from death. Joe Pernaento, who bears the reputation of being a bandit at home, and upon whose head there is a price, is being looked for by the police. The society was recently organized and is not looked upon with favor by the people, wbo class it with the highbinders and Mollie Maguirea. __ _ _ The Trntai on Prop- erty V.iluort 3100.000 of tho O., Sept. of thp worst wrecks in the history of the A Ohio railroad occurred i ten txu'.es v.vss of here at midnight Sat- I urday night. Eight men were killed, one tem'ilv injured and property to tho amount of SluO.O.'iO destroyed. The wreck was caused by tne failure of Francis Kelly, operator at Black Hand, to deliver orders to an eastbound freight, it at the station until westbound freight passed. Tho two trains collided on a sharp curve lust out- side of a dense wood and neither engi- neer saw the other train until within a few yards o! it. The enp-ineor P.PI! nromr.n on tho east- bound train junpnd, the latter escaping- uninjured, but the former, John Kemp, of Newark, had a ley cut off near his body and is not expected to live. Tha engineer and fireman of tbe westbound train were instantly killed, the former being terribly mangled by the splint- ered cars, which were rained into tho tender. His blood and brains were scat- tered over the ground for several feet around. The fireman was caught-be tween the engine and tender crushed to a FRIGHTFUL TRAGEDY. A Father KUU IIU Wedded Then PEOKIA, 111., Sapt father and daughter dead and a bridegroom crazs is the outcome of a wedding at Lacon, in Marshall County. Charles Selfert was tho father of a young girl named Mary, to whom Joseph Baxter was at- tached. His affection was reciprocated, bnt for some reason Soifert hated Bai- ter and forbade his daughter having anything to do with him. On Saturda5 Mary mot Baxter at the house of friend and tho two wore quietly mar- ried. Sunday morning she returned home to plead forgiveness. Her fathei refused to listen to her, and as she turned to leave the room ho grabbed a shotgun and fired, blow-in? off one side of her head and instantly killing her. Seifert then discharged the contonts of tbe remaining barrel of bis gun into his own head and fell dead. Uaxtor, who had remained outside, on hearing the report of the   Palling of Wall. PiTTSBtmorr, Sept. even- ing tho wall of a tenement houso ad- joining tho tannery of Jaraos Callory Co., Rivor avonuo, Allegheny City, fell with a crash, burying sovon workmen in the ruins. Tbe wall was boing torn down for tbe purpose of enlarging the tannery. An alarm was turned in and a forco of pollcoraon and flrenion com- menced the work of rescue. John Fae- and.1 "railage was taken out dead. Matthew When taken out Voswell and Joseph Voglo died a few Packlng House and Thousands of Hogs Burned. LATEST SEWS ITEMS. Anglo-American Provision Compuny'i Plant at the Chicago Stock Yards in Flames. of it: tho r- r ".-C-. 15 crushed to a palp. When taken out was roasted by tbo flre from the engine, minutes after The list of killed is as follows: John Joseph Mackowlts Radwa, ON THE DIAMOND. Pro- houses favored free coinage, the com- promise was rendered necessary by the fear of an Executive veto. Tbe effect of the new silver law was an immediate advance in the price of silver, culminat- ing at a figure higher than any known in history. The promise of the Republican party that more liberal pension legislation would be enacted was fulfilled in the passage of the disability pension act which a pension of S12 a month is given to any soldier who is now disabled from whatever cause. The applications received under this law since its enact- mentsoincreasedthe work of thePension Office that it was necessary for Congress to vote an additional appropriation for the employment of nearly 5DO clerks in that office and in the war records divi- sion of the Deparment of War. The addition of four new stars to the flag, made by the last Congress, has been supplemented at this sesson by the ad- mission into the Union of Wyoming and Idaho. A general land grant forfeiture act, the result of many years' discussion, has passed and will go to tho President to-dav. It is very comprehensive and in brief provides for tbe forfeiture of all unearned lands granted to aid in the construction of opposite por- tions of the road uncompleted at the time of the passage of the law. The question of lotteries having bsoa "brought to public attention by the of the Louisiana Lottery Company to obtain a charter in North Dakota and later to obtain a jsnowal at its charter an Louisiana, tho President made the a scbject of a special message to Congress in which he traoimittod a bill prepared by the Postmaster General to prohibit the transmission through the mails of letters and circulars relating to lotteries aad of newspapers contain- ing lottery This bill passed arotnptly by Wth houses without modification and waa signed by the President Attcr a lively con-roversy over the question of selecUa? a site. which the of New York. Chicago, St Loais aad TTashington were concerned. Con- gress passed a law creating a national comsiMioa aad establishing ihe World's Fair at Cniciro- As a principtflT o? tbe yrohibi- tioa which sbuis American meat oat of markets abroad. law to fmrAv for the inafwctioa, z-.fa direction of tto Secretary of Arriiaitare. of meats iafreaded for ex- port; probibitiay tac erporiaSoa of adalieratei of arsi dtiflk eaabiia; tis PrwMewt of izapwre or ads Results of Games Ili-tween Following are the scores of Saturday's games: KATlONAlt UtAOTTR. At Cleveland-Brooklyn 7. Cleveland 4. At 2. Chicago 6 At York 15, Cincinnati 81 At game-wet grounds. PLAYKRS" At 0, Cleveland i At Caicago 1. At 8, Pittsburgh 31 At York a. Buffalo S. Second York 8, Buffalo 3. AMERtCAX ASSOCIATION. At 8, Toledo 15. At St. 5. St. Louis T. SUNDAY GAMES. At 2, Columbus 4. Second 2, Rochester 2, called At St. 4. St. Louis 3. Second 1, St Louis 8. At 1. Toledo At 10, Louisville 3. Buckingham, engineer, Newark, 0.; John Cochran. residence unknown; Bon- Jarain Smart, brakotuan, Gratlot, O.; Glenn Bash, Zanesville; Thomas Mc- Croary, Newark; George W. Stone- burner, Zanesvine; William Firestone, fireman, Newark; one unknown. The dead were removed to an empty car as fast as recovered and taken to Newark for buriaL A largo forco of men were at work all day clearing the track of tho debris. Twcnty-tbreo loaded cars wore completely demolished and it took all day Sunday to got the track clear. Tho operator fled soon as he learned the awful result of bis careless; ness and bus not jot M" anprehendod. feature of tbe was defeat of tbc Blair catioaal bill ia Tt has that brfy trrenl other Con- aad WM qaite Will Prosecute the Preacher. MrsjfEAPOLts, Sept Insur- ance- Commissioner of Minnesota has fin- ished a long examination into tho affairs of the Knights of Aurora and exoner- ated the society, stating that tho book- keeping had beon careless. Several weeks ago Rev. L. G. Powers, of this city, asked an investigation with a view to winding up its affairs, fillesjing gary, perjury and embezzlement on tho part of Dr. C. E. Rogers and other su- preme officers in Minneapolis. Dr. Rogers says he will have Rev. Powers arrested for criminal libel and indicted for perjury. Powers is castor of a lead- ing 'UniversaUst church here. Fonrtb Attempt at Train Wrecking. AI.LTANCH, 0., Sept. 29. Another cowardly attempt was made Saturday at Maximo, near here, to wreck the lim- ited going west on the Pittsburgh. Ft. Chicago road. One rail had been dragged partly across the track and others were ready. A farm wagon bad also beon placed on the track. A freight camo along unex- pectedly and knocked the -wagon into kindling wood. Tbe rail was pushed ahead of the engine and oil tho track. This i- the fourth attempt at this place. Those implicated in tho first three at- tempts are in the penitentiary. Excitement OTCT STT.EN O., Sept This town is con- siderably stirred up oror a wholesale ar- rest that was made here Saturday. The A.. T. P. Railroad Company has had detective? at work for several days spot- ting the coal steaiers and train jumpers. By the assistance of Some dor.on special police tbe set was thrown and the rc- suii Tfis the arrest of thirty-two aiea bojs one They wore conveyed to Warrca WIU Micb.. Sept Lsce has serjt letters to all tbe prosc- cciiag attorneys in MicbSgaa ordarin? then: to see to It that tbe new Caitc-J States ajrainst lotteries is siricily enforced. This move was rca-ie at tbe reqsesi of aaii-lottory cwpie o' is cora- ttx Governor tbst the law be obejed x> tbe very letter. PARK. Mass.. Sept Hares, wife of Dr. Cbarles C Hayes, sault ia rtie Xepoasct river Sbe fifty agv. Her 1m taken to Madisoa, where her fatbet, ex-Got SAX ASTOXIO, Tex.. Sept. half a dozen Mexican exhibitors bring- ing thoir products to the International' fair, which opens here Tuesday, are in town. They all deny the story of the attempted assassination of President Diaz on the night of September 15. There was nothinjjrJhey ''ay, discharge of firearms by a few drunken Mexicans who were on the plaza treat- ing tho palace. No systematic -effort the life of was made and the discharge of guns was by throe drunken soldiers, who are in Jail. EiiglUh Comment on the Tariff BUL Sept. Times pre- dicts that the McKinley tariff will cut both ways. It will do great harm to America, while dislocating the general industries of tbe world. The Daily News Bays tho earlier tariff had already par- alyzed the American export trade in manufactures; the McKinley tarift may kill it. The true danger to England's supremacy will begin only whon froo trade for tho American opens to those intelligent and powerful rivals tho markets of the world. Exploded With a Terrific Report. HAVEX. Conn., Sept. of tho fulminate dry houses of tho Win- chester Arras Company exploded Sun- day morning with a terrific report Mo one was Injured. Tho watchman, who had just left the building, was about 100 feet away and was thrown down by tbe shock. Fortunately the house, a small oie, was some distance from the larger buildings, otherwise great damage would have been done. Attached the Gate LOCISVIXT.E, Ky., Sept 29. President Phelps, of tho American Association, yesterday attached the Syracuse club's share of tbo gato receipts for the two games at Eclipse Park. Tbe attach- ment was made to cover S500 claimed to i e duo tbe Association in dues accumu- lated against tho Syracuse club since June last. Manaeor Frazer and Presi-. dent PholpJ finally settled the matter amicably.______________ Penitentiary Hlnillnir DcxTrrti, Minn., Sept mem- bers of the State Prison Board hare re- turned home from the east. They have purchased worth of machinery which binding twiae will Ixj man- jfactured ia tho Stillwater penitentiary. Death of General Da NEW YonK. Sept Abram Duryea died Saturday at his residence in this city. He bad beon ill for somo lime vrith paralysis. He served throtgb- th" war and founded tbe corps inown as tbe "Daryea ZonaToa." Tot la Any Harry Sept the mass race-t- in? of Side street car ciaployes se'.d early Sunday morning It dc- to defer definite action in regard io the question of inaugurating strike an til next Saturday Bight So Troth In tli-; Story. OMAHA. Neb., Sept. tbe bcad- jTjarters of the Union Pacific railroad in tbU city, the reported wreck that road near Shosboae, Idaho, ia wfcici twenty people were said boem killed, is offV Tiuf JPUl WAJHTJOTOT, Sept gtturter seriously hurt Two other work- men were rescued and removed to tholi homos before the extent of their injuries could be learned. All of the dead and injured are Hungarians. DRAMATIC SUICIDE. A Wretoli Shoots Ulmialf lc Cathedral. Losnox, Sept Sunday morning's service at St Paul's cathedral the worshipers were startled by pistol shots In quick succession. Aftei the excitement had subsided it learned that a man In tbe congregation had committed suicide by shooting him- self twice with a revolver. The suioide'i name was Easton, but nothing further concerning his identity nor the cause ol the tragedy could bo ascertained. The man seemed to have beon destitute and half starved, and it is conjectured that bo was some unemployed and despond- ent wretch who sought by his dramatic self-destruction to call attention to existence of such cases. t Ohmrire Ship's OlBcor. SAW FRVffcisco, Sept 39.-The steamer -Yorktown has arrived here from New York. The voyage was a stormy one. Boatswain James Woston was lost over- board daring a squall. A boat which was sent out to attempt his rescue was capsized, but tho crew were saved. James Carr, a seaman, has lodged com- plaint with the police that Weston's death was caused by tho second mate, Thomas Nolan, deliberately cutting the lino to which Weston was holding while over the ship's side doing somo work that Nolan had order >d him to do dur- ing tho storm. Other sailors corrobo- rated Carr's statement_____ Famoni Woman Dies. FAU, RIVEK, Mass., Sopt Hannah Cook, who in 1S19 started the third power loom put up in this city, died Saturday in tho oiffhty-sovcnth year of her Mrs. Cook was also the discoverer of the skeleton which was celebrated by Longfellow in his poem "Tbe Skeleton in Armor." Tho skeleton was found in a sand bank and was destroyed in the Athonoum firo in 1843. _______________ A. JJ.adloCk ISrokon. COBT.ESKTLL, N. Y., Sept deadlock in tbe Democratic Congros sional convention for tbe Twenty-fourth district was broken bore Saturday. George Van Horn was nominated on the forty-fifth ballot for tbe long terra and John Pindar for the short torm to suc- ceed David Wilbur, deceased. LOM Eittmatrd at More Than 000 Hundred Thrown Oat of Employment. CHICAGO, Sept than one- half of tho extensive Stock Yards plant and -property of tho Anglo-American Provision Company was destroyed by flre Sunday. The most conservative estimate of the loss is S'OO.OOa, the highest nearly Prior to its acquisition a few months since by the English syndicate with a capital of the property was owned by Fowler Bros. Considerable mystery surrounds the origin of the flre. Flames discovered in tho engine rooms shortly after one a. m. and tho private ftro company maintained by the English- men fought them for some time boforo calling for reinforcements from tho city. Boforo those arrived tho flames had spread to tho inuuonso packing bouse, thence to warehouses F B. In tho packing house were dressed hogs which had been slaughtered during the past two days, while on oao floor of tho adjoining warehouse there were pounds of sausage in pro- cess of curing. On tho othor floors of this and tho adjoining warehouses wore stored the product of bogs, to- gether with an immense quantity of beef. With this material to food on the ftro raged furiously for hours and al- though twenty-six of tho city engines wore called into requisition, It was not until late In tho afternoon that it was brought under control. At one time It was foarod that tho conflagration would cover a greater portion of 'the packing house district Several thousand live hogs were with difficulty saved from warehouse F. loss proper Is fully covered by Insur- ance, but the loss resulting from suspension of business will bo enormous, as the concern has been killing from 4.000 to hogs daily and proposed to Increase the number to In two weeks. Thirteen hundred men are thrown out of employment. A search- ing Investigation Into tho origin of the fl-e to bo made. General Manager Stobo places the loss on building at 375.- 000; machinery, including three Ice ma- ohines, and stock nearly ooa _____ Marrlod In Balloon. Pa., Sept special premium offered to the couple who would bo married in a balloon at the fair grounds, was claimed Saturday by Miss Elsie Vandall, of Cleveland, O., tbe balloon ascensionist and parachute jumper, and W. M. Basaott, who is one of the balloon party. Felt Heir to goren BRISTOL. Pa., Sept Will- iams, a coachman of'this place, and his brother William, living at Blackburn, y. T., are said to hare inherited 87.000, 000 by tbe death of their uncle, Theo- dore Lnderick. of Parsee, Cal. Laderick who was a bachelor, emigrated to Call fornia ia 1S47. to to Tartlt Sept thousand mother-of-pearl button makers have been locked oat, owing to the passage of tbe McKinley tariff bill, which threatens to put a atop entirely to tha _______________ Dettttiittofi tm Worth Dakota.-> N. D., Sept are a failure to the drought an  ia procariBjr tbe Boodle Atrtortnon an Trial. DES Morses, la., Sept. case against the Des Molnes boodle aldormen up Saturday in the District Court on the demurrer by the defendants. They were Indicted for "wilful miscon- duct in office" and maintain that such a crime is not known to tho statutes. Tbe entire day was consumed in the argu- ments of attorneys. The aldermen are charged with increasing their meager salaries by issuing warrants in payment of fictitious claims and appropriating the proceeds. Tbo ex-city auditor and book-keeper are implicated. Cnt Down thti GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Sopt. Western Union telegraph polos In Canal were cut down Saturday night under the direction of tho city marshal and mayor. Tbe company refused to vacate the street, which is being ex- tensively improved, or to occupy tbo ron polos erected by tbo city jointly with tho electric light and electric rail- road companies. Tho city bad been enjoined in the United States Court from cutting tho polos two wooks ago, jut tho injunction was dissolved and tho >olea came down.__________ Between SotllerH find FLORENCE, Wis., Sopt Home- steaders coming in for supplies from Beechwood. on tho Northwestern road, thirty milea west of here, report a bat- tle between men in tho employ of tho Metropolitan Lumber Company and homesteaders at that point in which two or three horses belonging to the lumber company wore shot dead. Se- rious trouble Is expected if tho lumber- men keep on logging on land claimed by tbe homesteaders. Public sympathy is with tho homesteaders. Mr Can. PETEMBCKO, Sopt. A train o it WM that C had Frooa all the KAL-UI. IAY, At Woodstock. Oar.. tUo ui'd testimony iu tbe LHrcuci.l nuu-dr- has closed. lion. Richard V.ius has boon rr natod for Congress by Third Pennsylvania district. At Troy, N. Y.. the of K. the alleged train wrecker, postponed until next Thursday- The Souato has passed the join: rnET> lution to appropriate nickol to bo used in armor Tho King of Holland has V 3 relapse, llis condition li sued it La is unablo to sign state doc'.imoyit... President Harrison has vx.'tJ il onlj five bills, all comparatively tant In tho first session of tho Congress Grover Cleveland vwtoc-J. BS billi. Robert P. Porter, suporintendont the Census, has sailed for Europe- Me- Portor is threatened with easo and ho was ordered ly bis physician. Nearly bills and resolutions Uiarf wore ropurted to tbe House iruin mitteca during this session of C .nyrsia failed of passage and remain on tbo House calendar. Tho Census Oluoo has slia populations of tbo following Ohio ciT.ifcJ and towns, with increases IS99: Marietta increase l.Ojl: >fnrtin'a Ferry 0.247, increase incronso Owing to considerable pressxiro hav- ing boon put. upon them, tbo rmttileiptil- ity of Genoa hare at last boifun work of restoring tho houso iis which Christopher Columbus lived. It rapidly falling into decay. Tho appropriations made by tha Fifty first Congress for the fiscal year raiding Juno 30, 1891, aggregate! aboril an increase of crret those made by the Fiftieth Conjrw-iw the fiscal year ending June 30, IS'JO. Tho village of Kiumount, Out-, almost entirely destroyed by 'Ire tbf other night In five hours tbe entire business portion of the Tillage itroyed. Only two hotels and one atom are left No ostlmato of tbo Polish journals assert that flaring reoont tnanouvros of the Rusalaa frroopf at Eovno tho bridge over the Winprcz at Krasonofilow collapBi-'fl awJ the Pultown regiment intc- the water. Pour hundred soldier? wote drowned. Department Commander the G. A. R. of Kansas, Ima rocuivod a moss-irrc from prlratc -iocrotriry H il'n-i stating that President Harrison ac- cepted tho invitation to bo at tbe State reunion ot the department at Topoka, October 10. The British ship Gretnar from Lotxkw for San Francisco, which was glvou ap for lost by the undorwritera, has arrived San Francisco. The Gretna enooun- torod a of heavy galoa durfrsg which she was blown far out of Uei course. She was out 202 days. Friends of Representative Spoon-'-ir, cl RhoiLo Island, claim that through ttta'u- take in the Rhode Island manual Congressman has boon credited rrinh having received but 1.3D7 his last election, while official ihow that his actual majority was number of Senate bills wbfeh havo passed tbo Sonate at this uoiwiwt! of Congress is t, 100, while tbe msfibwi which phased tho Senate in' botb rtes- siona of tho Fiftieth Congress was onlj The number of Senate bills sonl to tho I'rcsidout at this session has boon ISO, and tho number of [louse bills 70S. TILE 5IAJIKETS: Flour. Grain unit rrovUlon. YORK, Sept. M O.N Closed Panic ID Barnlnc Chnreh. PEOBIA, I1L, Sopt aftor tbe beginning of morning norvlces yes- terday at Grace Mission Presbyterian church it was discovered that tho edi- fice, a large frame structure, was on flre. The congregation made a wild rush for the door and the excited people tumbled over each other to reach the open air. Almost miraculously no or.o was hurt The building was destroyed. Loss, insurance. at: iw closed steady. Posted rates i actual rates V4 for sixty Jays and or dem.itid Oovernmrnt bondi closed steady. 3s in; coupon, Ci.ever, Sept. lit Minnesota patent at Minnesota spring WHEAT -No. 3 red NTo stfi.t. (Jons-No. 2 mixed at 510, wcaUrn a' Uo. a mixed ut N'o. So. 3 at Ho. BUTTER-Fancy creatnory at 21c. dn.ry Ne-w York at lie. Ohio at itc. froih 'it r.-c. POTATO at Vx vvr bH.-tiCi- A MT. O., Sept 39. Sat- urday morning a masked man entered the ticket office of the Cleveland, Akron 
                            

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