Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Salem Daily News

Location: Salem, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 25, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SAJLEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II, NO. 227. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 25. 1890. TWO CENTS. Text of tbe BO1 as it Passed Senate. It Authorises the Appointment of an Additional Circuit Judge j, the It Crvafras Circuit Court of Appeal! la Bach of Holding the Annual Sept 25. The Federal Court bill, as It passed the Senate yes- terdaT, proyldes for the appointment by the President of an additional Circuit Judge, with the same compensation aa other Circuit Judaea. It creates In each elrcuit a Circuit Court of Appeals to con- sist of three judges and which is to be a court of record, with appellate jurisdic- tion. The court is to have a NARROW ESCAPE Of fifteen era OB a Chicago Car From Death IB Jltwr. CHICAGO, Sept. persons narrowly escaped a cold bath and possi- bly death by drowning in the river at Clark street yesterday morning. The night car of the Lincoln avenue line tumbled over the north approach to t-e bridge into the cold waters shortly bo- fore one o'clock. The accident was the result either of the carelessness of George Schandein, the driver, or of the failure of the brake to work after tho car struck thf long incMnc loading j down to the approach' froia the viaduct. j The bridge had been upeaed just as the J street car appeared on tho viaduct, to allow the bargo Harold to pass. Schandein says he applied :he brake, but the car, instead of baiting-, shot down against the horsas and striking them with a g-ood deal of force sent A Day's Doings in tho tod House. Sonato Several Bills Passed Others cnsscd by the Senate. Mr. Kennedy's Celebrated Speech eluded From the Permanent Recom- mits hy tho Hooatt WASHINGTON, Sept H. Sanate yesterday Mr t'rye oflcred it concurrent resohuios, to. directing the Secretaries of S'ate. Troasury. War and Navy to examine the report and recoiamen-lationa of {nteruation-.l marir.e conference of Febru- ary, 1S90, and to prepare and submit to Congress bi'.'.s for the enactment into law of sueh recod- so far as they apply to their re- spective departments and meet their approvaL The Somte then rmssecl the following ill 10 re.'er to the Court of Claims cer- Clerk at thom tearing down the hill lie could L'.u claims cf the Shumiee and a'not control either the arah, or tho a year and a marshal at year. A term is to be held annually by i torsos. ThP conductor, seeing- that a the Circuit Court of Appeals ia the sev-j Seri0u9 accidont v.-as iir.ruinonr. called judicial circuits at tho following to passengers to save themselves and jumped from tho flying car. Tho passengers jumped >OL doDra and fairly climbed over each ether in their haste to get out and with, rare good luck all succeeded iu reach- ing the street before tbo cr.r took its tumble. Nobody was hurt. Tb-- driver, Schandein, jumped w'len tho horses on Seiute bill to an act eu- i-Jed net tn nut Her're or r.ilroud In the DLS- places, In the first circuit in the city of Boston, iu the second in the city of Kcw York, in the third in the city of Philadelphia, in the fourth in the city of Richmond, in the fifth in tho city of New Oieans, in the sixth in the city of Cincinnati, in the seve th in the city of Chicago, in the eighth In city of St. Louis, In the ninth in the city of San Francisco, and in suoh other places in each of the above circuits as said court may from time to time desij- nate. The first terms of said courts are to be held on the second Monday in Jan- uary, 1S91, and thereafter at such times is may he fixed by said courts. No appeal, whether by a writ of error or otherwise, is to be hereafter taken or allowed from any district to tbe exist- ing circuit courts, and no appellate jur- isdiction la hereafter to be exercised or allowed by said existing circuit courts, but all appeals by writ of error or other- wise, from said district courts, shall only be subject to review In the Su- preme Court of the United States or the Circuit Court of Appeals established by thebUL Appeals or writs of error maybe taken frow. the district courts or from the circuit courts direct to the Su- preme Court on the following cases: la any case to which the jurisdiction of the court is in issue; in such cases the ques- tion of jurisdiction alone shall be certi- fied to the Supreme Court from thte court below for decision from the final sentences and decrees in prize causes. In oases of conviction of a capital or other iufarnou's crime. In any case that Involves the construction or application of the Constitution of the United States. In any case tn which the constitution- ality of any. law of the United States, or the validity or construction of any treaty made under its authority, Is drawn in question. In any case In which the Constitution or law of a State is claimed to be in contravention of the Constitution of tbe United States. t: ti-Jed the Baltimore tnct o' Columbia" v.ith .1 Tne next Mil on thj e il to 'jrevnT CAN'T AGitEE. Vo Conclanloii Reached by the RepaMlo- an Conferees on the Sugar Schedule and Doty on binding- Twine. WASHINGTON, Sept The Repub- lican conferees of the tariff bill had a meeting yesterday morning and dis- cussed at some length the differences between the two houses on the augar schedule and tbe duty on binding twine, these being the most material points of difference now existing between the two houses. No conclusion was reached and at a further conference in tho aftornoon there was tho same result An adjourn- ment was had at half past four o'clock till nine this morning. action of the Western Senators entering a protest against, the proposition to place a small duty on binding twine has complicated matters seriously. The conferees and other Republicans who are interested in the fate of tho bill have used every possible argument with the recalcitrant Senators, but thus far apparently without effect The con- fcrees now say that it is almost impossi- ble to come to an agreement unless the compromise is mado on binding twine and tbat if the conference roport should be rejected through the efforts of tbe friends of free binding twine. Senators who are opposed to other features of the bill will feel at liberty to use tho same tactics to eastern exchanges and it will impossible to pass the tariff bill. Fonnrt Dead In His Rootn- HAVEX, Conn., Sopt "Wed- nesday morning the remains of W. F. Young, a mechanic employed by the Winchester Arms Company, wore dis- covered lying on the bed in a room in the Merchants' HotcL Tbe man had been dead for two weeks at least. Young was a man of irregular habits and the chambermaid thought nothing of the that she had been ucable to enter tte room. Yesterday a horrible stench coarinced tbe chambermaid that soroe- was wrong. Tbe iloor was broken the decomposed remains of Young were found. It Is thought he day bare taken poison. The Vtrehall Harder Trial. WOODSTOCK, Sept a great crowd at ih-3 Biichaii mur- der trial Wednesday. Medical tcsti- teony warn introduced. Dr. Taylor that two bullets through Beawell's brain and the pistol held oiose to his head. Death was so sadden that the heart shaped at tbe haif beat. occurred probablr four hours be- fore the body was foarid. Many other witnesses were examined, all of whose tettiajony goes to scow tbat iJircbail tbe mardcrer. were plunging over the brink of the ap- proach. Both horses ere drowned. CHAMPED HIS FLEA. Baett, the Allegro it Train TTrtTlt-r, With- draws His Tien ol" (iuiltv nn.l Substitutes One of Xot Guilt j. THOY, TSf. Y., Sept. P-nett, who Tuesday in the Court of Sessions entered a plea of gxiilty to tho indict- ment charging him with tho attempted wrecking of a New York Central tram j pr in the town of Greenbush on September 4 last, appeared by counsel yesterday morning at eleven o'clock, and instead of receiving his sentence as was ex- pected, withdrew his plea and substi- tuted one of not guilty. The court ac- cepted the substitute, and the trial of the accused was set down for to-day. C H. Reach, counsel for Buett in ex- plaining to the court thf reason for Buett's change of base, said that tho Pinkerton and railroad detectives had kept counsel and all others away from the man until they had persuaded him to plead guilty; that there was no evi- dence in the case to convict; that tho pretended confessions were valueless and that Buett broke down and wept when he (Reach) first approached him to talk about the case. Mind. Mich.. Sept O. H. Moore was taken to St Joseph re- treat, a private asylum near Detroit, Tuesday for treatment Ten years ago, while serving ia the regular army on the frontier, he was overcome by tbe heat and. has since gradually lost his mind and is now a physical wreck. Colonel Moore is the man who, when his command was surrounded July 4, 1S03, by the rebel General Morgan at Tibbs Bend, Ky., cut his way out against fear- ful odds, replying whon summoned to surrender, -with the words which made him famous; "Yankees never surrender on the Fourth of nd.iv was House Mil 'Ue product i-f eonvi.-t Inbor from oo- or for ur- of any depart- uK-nt of Govcrru; j n and to prevent the yro- i duct of ron.-ict la'.ior tv-.tnf? -I-.C-1 upon public buiMuusor uth.r publ.c woros, but the hour I for tho eiileai'ar having expired while Mr CockTell was incinlrtnir whether a report 1 tie bill, the bill went over wlth- I out action. S aate rc-sumed consideration of the 1 House bill with Sauate substitute, to define and rftgulate the jurisdiction of the courts ol the United Sl-uos, the pending question being on Mr. amendment to substitute Bal- for r.s theulace to hold court la the foui th o 'strict Th" amendment was re- lected-yeas 28, naya 3S. Tlie Senate substitute for tho House bill was then 45, navs C> A conference was asked, and Mflssrs. F.varts. Hoar and Pugli were appointed con forces on the purt of thy The Senate then re-turned consideration of bill to establish a United States land court to provide for the settlement ofprivate land claims in several   adjourned MUler. w'aovrv seated in place of Elliott from tho Seventh South Carolina dis- trict appearrcl sit tho b-ir of the House day and toon the outu ot oClce. A resolution from the Foreten Affiurs Com- mlttce cuUin.; on tho President for Information about the killing of Gtrcral Barrunda was to A resolution from the judiciary ommittG iVractmfj that Mr. Kennedy's cele- atcd bo excluded from tUe permanent- Hecord. Wtts agreed to. Mr. Kennedy defended hirasolf la a long speech The IVeneh Spolia- tion Claims amendment to the Deficiency bill was uoo-concurr, d to a confer- ence was orde-ed. Senate bills were pained- pensioning Mrs Fremont, Mrs. MoClellam and Mrs. Crook. Oa motion of Mr. Boutolle. ot Maine, tbe Ben- ate bill was passed providing that nftTil Towels of the first rate be tamed after Statoo Of the Union; those of the second rate after cities; those of the tlnrd ruto aTter Important or nam.-s connected witk the naval-aUWry those of the fourth rate after lakes and rivers. On mot'on of Mr. Townsend, of Colorado, Senate hill was passed (with an Amendment In- cluding the Pa0'osa Springs reservation) open- Incto fiom'-stead the Fort Lyon and the Old Fort Lyon reservations in Colorado. The House then adjourned. Treanurer Hustou Will CHICAGO, Sept. special to tho Herald from Connersville, Ind., Fays: "James N. Huston, Treasurer of tbo United States, will resign his office within three weeks and return to this city. The exact date of his resignation has not been decided upon, but it wil! be sent to Prosidont Oar risun as soon as Mr. HustoTi's residence is ready for oc- cupancy. Friends of the President aro urging Mr. Huston to remain in Wash- ington and hold back his resignation until after the Indiana elections, but ho is deaf to thoir appeals and- persists in his intention of resigning." A BIG TIME, Consider it an Sopt 25. a meet- ing of George G. Meade Post. 0. A. R., a resolution was adopted condemnatory of a new organization formed in Wash- ington composed of men who fought on lifforent sides during the late war with the object of good will be- tween the North and the South. Tho resolution of Meade Post rocitoa that while the members of the poet "long to welcome tbe day when the North and the South shall cherish no feelings of animosity toward each other, yet it ia tbe sense of the post tb at the new asso- ciation is an insult to the Grand Array of the Republic." tllll Ont of NEW YOHK. Sept sf-dal from Albany, N. Y., says: C. F. R. Coe, private secretary w Lieutenant Gover- nor Jones, is authority for tho state- meat tbat Governor Hill is out of poli- tics. According to Mr. Coe, the Gover- nor dons not want a renotninaiion. In Speaking about tbe matter, thu Lieuten- ant Governor's secretary says: "Edward J. Jones will be tbe Democratic nominee for Governor next year and he wiil bare- the Support of Governor Hill. He will also receive the indorsement of Farmer's Alliance." Btrsos Arr.Ks. Sept SL tresident of tbe Union who waa made provisional President of the rc- pvblfc daring tbe late relation, bM tn4cre4 bis resbrvaUoa totttt iecliaM to accept IS. _, The BO5TOT, Sept. 2-i. The f xytin the Potter-Loteil liabilities have bfeea reached, and the indebtedness of all is foand to be about Ss.ooo.ooo. The direct indebtedness to the banks about The indirect liabilities are large of the guarantees placed apoa a great deal of paper. of People the Sham Kav.il on Halkfna. HALIFAX, N. S., SopL of spectators witnessed the sham naval attack on this place yesterday. The war ships Bellerophon, Canada and Thrush opened the battle by attempting to make a landing near Herring Cove, but the big guns of that place compelled the ships to retire in the direction of York redoubt under full spood. Com- ing- within range of the last named fort the Bellerophon and Thursh lot go both sidos simultaneously, tho heavy guns at York redoubt replying so hotly that if the battle was roal Admiral Watson and his fleet would have been blown to atoms. The floct continued up the har- bor at a rapid rate, mooting with brisk firing from forts Ivos, McNabs, Clarcucc- and Ogilvio, the fleet firing as they wont. Tho liattlo lasted forty minutes. The military authorities haro claim that the result of the maneuvers shows that had the fight been a real one not one of tho vessels could have nassed York redoubt, as they would have been blown to atoms; that the British North America squadron is wholly too small to successfully attack a place so well forti- fied as Halifax, and that no vessel of an anemy could outer Halifax in -time of war. ______________ 1'urchane of 8ltTer> WASHINGTON, Sept. Director of tho Mint yesterday purchased 140.000 ounce? of silver bullion at the follow- ing prices: Twenty-five thousand ounces at ounces at 1.13025, and 25.000 ounces at 1.1375. The total amount offered aggregated ounces. In- cluding yesterday's purchases the total amount of silver bought by the Govern- ment under the new law Is ounces, leaving about ounces to be purchased the remainder ol the month. ______________ Killed. Jficnowos. Pa., Sept. Swartr., a Delaware, Lackawanna Western brakeman, waa found cut to pieces on the railroad near here yestcr- clr-.v morning, portions of his mangled body being scattered along the track for several hundred yards. Besides tbe train from he fell two other tr-ins passed over his body before it was found. Together. Ta., Sept his wife were found j dead at their horoe Mor.day evening. OD a slip of paper was written: "We togeiher; gone to meet oar children." Mr. and Mrs. Stagerwald were an couple and had children, all of whom iied within tbe past three years. INCKEASE of the Xavy Tarde Will M Allowed Before the Coming- Eleettoa. WASKIXGTOX, Sept. Secre- tary of the Nary, In a recent circular to the commandants of the various navy yards in view of the elec- tion In November, calls special atten- tion to the act of Congress providing that no increase in the force ot any yard shall be made any time within sixty days before an election. The secretary says that careful atten- tion should be given to the execution of this law, and directs commandants as soon as possible after September 4 to tnake returns to the department show- ing tho number of men employed at that time and their specific duties. They are directed to conduct thn work under their charge as if no election were to take place, and under no cir- cumstances are they permitted to in- crease their foroo even temporarily. The circular says that "the department at tho present timedoas not foresee any oriaror.cy requiring an increase of force during tbo period covered by law, and nothing but the most imperative ne- cessity will iud'.tco it to grunt authority for such increase." A Detroit Couple While RMInR In That City Are Up nud Robbeil of M-.ney and .Tewelrj. DETROIT, Mich., Sept George Keiter, of this city, accompanied by Miss Mary Murphy, was driving along- the boulevard from JolTsrson avenue to Champlain street, shortly before ten o'clock Monday evening, whon tho oar- riage was suddenly stopped by two men. One held a revolver to Koiter's head while the other compelled tho lady to alight Miss Murphy was dragged sov- aral rods away, roughly handled and re- lieved of a 8300 diamond pin and other jeweiry. The men then took 825 from Keiter and made their escape. Reiter drove to Elmwood avenue station and reported the matter to the police. The robbers were not masked and Mr. Reiter thinks ho can identify them. Ho says he had hung about his nock, which tho robbers overlooked. Every effort has been made to trace the bandits, but thus far without success. ON THE DIAMOND. Dolnss on League, Amnclatinnand Broth- erhood Oroanrta. Following are the scores of Wednes- day's g antes: NATIONAL LEAGUE. At 3, Pittsburgh fl. At 5, Cincinnati i. At Philadelphia 9, Chicago S. AMEUICAN ASSOCIATION. At 8, Columbus2. At 7, Toledo 0. At 1. Louisville At St PLAYEUS' H.EAOUB. At- 12, Pitts- burgh 6. At York 4, Buffalo 8. At Philadelphia 2, At York 0, Cleveland 5. Items of Interest From Various Places tn the State. FISH STEALEKS SHOT. Mea Caught Hobbtnc FUh Shot hy the Owaer, Who to Also Badly CKLINA, O.. Sept night about midnight a row-boat pulled in from off Lake Mercer containing Jacob Bodkin and a young man from Van Wert Both of them had been shot They are very reticent about tho mat- ter, but claim they were shot by souio hunters. By a strange coincidence Ja- cob Anderson, living along tho lake about six miles oast of hero, was shot about nine o'clock Tues lay night Ander- son is a fisherman, and somo one has been stealing his fish. watching ho caught two men in tho act of robbing his nets aad called on them to como ashore ar.d surrender. His answer was a loud of shot, twen- ty-two of which struck him. llo promptly returned it with both barrels of his shotgun at the twomon, who wore in a row-boat about thirty foot from him. He does not Know what tho result was. hut thinks ho struck thorn both. Anderson is badly hurt Somo of tba shot penetrated tholuugs and will prob- ably result fatally.________ THK DEADLY MOTOlt. One Man Ktllrd nml Another linn llli Leg UrokiMi. Sopt 25. About a. m. Wednesday, William Soidol, a Ger- man aged forty yoars, living at 704 For- est street, and working as a frame-maker In a Spring stroet factory, dropped his lunch basket from a Broadway motor by aocidont Without looking for danger, he sprang to the ground to recover his basket and wan struck by a motor going in the opooslte direction. Tho motor ran over Scidel's breast and mangled him fearfully He diftd in ambulance. At nine a. m., also near the Junction of Broadway and Forest streot, August Vjecemiskr, aged thirty-ono, married and living at No. 81 Victoria street, cot tangled up with a Broadway motor and was dragged some distance. His left leg was badly broken and Koeblcr's am- bulance took him home. _ Crated by Drink. CosrsF.AUT, Sopt H. Hill, an employe of tho Nickel Plate, whilo crazed with drink, drove his family out of doora and domollshoA the furniture. His brother undertook to reason with him and was attacked by Hill with all tho violence of a madman and received very serious injuries on his head and faoa. Ho finally got away and sought refuge in tho house of a neighbor, but Hill followed him and after trying to break open tbe door he sat down to await the appearance of his victim. The police wore finally notified and when they appeared a lively scone ensued. Hill fought llko n demon, but was over- powered and dragged off to tbo lock- OBltMAJS CATHOLICS. Third KeMlofi of the German CutboOs Ofllcvra Kiected. PITTSBURGH, Sept The third sion of the Gorman Catholic Congress Opened yesterday by requiem hijh luasa St Michael's church in memory ol the deceased members of the associa- tion. Bishop Rodormacher, of Tonn., acted as celebrant In t'.ic ;-.itor- noon tho Young Men's Association re- convened to take further action in or- ganizing a coutral uajon ot Gorman Roman Catholic young men of the United States. N" Simon, Ch.oago, road tho constitution. In was stated that tho namu of the r.c'v, organi- zation was to bo ''the CuthoLc Union of the American German Catholic Youth's Societies." Tho object of the organization is to work for the moral, spiritual .11. 1 intel- lectual improvement of all tut- Gorman Catholics youths ia this country; to re- tain as much as possible the of Iho German language and promote th" faro of the Roman Catholic church in things and all their The f.'i- cersof tho now central union v ore -.it'll elected as follows: G. or hi- cago. president; Y. W.ulMn" St. Louis, vice pvusuloul; X. of cago, secretary: lr. Loctilor, of AiU'jUo- ny City, treasurer. At tho evening session niado by Rev. liishop Carl ?t East St.. Louis: N. Conner, of Milwau- kee, and Dr. Ernest Loiber, of the Prus- sian Landtag. Talking about pa- rochial schools, Dr. Leibur sr.iil   to the China Station. WASHISGTOX, Sept pub- lished report to tbe effect tbat the United States stoamer Baltimore is on her way home is incorrect Tbe vessel will proceed to Lisbon as originally in- tended and there await orders. As yet no orders have been decided upon, but It is probable that she will be sent to the station as tbe flagship of that squadron. _______________ Are at Liberty to r Mtnt. Sept Lonsdalc presided at the Ormonde club meeting, which lasted two boars. Slsvin was present The secretary of the club stated tbat by tbe decision of the maf- toe two are at liberty to ootnpete. Therefore, with the -view of coinciding with the magistrates, the mm have fcffrwed to reduce tbe number of rounds from thirty to fifteen. SUvin returned to Dover Cowfc A noMe- of aygrttaf {Mvcllrlttw has ar- Fatal Shooting Affray at Uma. LIMA, Sept At Ottawa, near this city. Tuesday night, Sherman Lines, a barber, and D. L. Leo, a furniture deal- er, quarreled, whon Leo drew a revolver and fired at Lines who also pulled a re- volver and commenced firing. Six shota were exchanged and both were fatally wounded. Both will leave families. Tho trouble grew out of Leo placing somo obstructions in tbo pathway lead- ing from Linos' shop to his home be- yond Leo's store. Both have boon placed under arrest _ Dentil of an Ci.Evcr.AXD, Sopt. 25.-Ex-Couneilman Charles Burnside djcd at his home, Ib'JT Euclid avenue, Tuesday afternoon. Ho had been ill for a long time with kidney and livor troubles, but was not thought to bo In any immediate danger until a few days ago, when his malady took a suddon turn for the worse. Burnsido was prominent in local politics for a number of years. The funeral will bo held undor the auspices of Oriental commandcry, Knights Templar. Cut In Two. Sopt 25.- -Clayton Hollo- way, a brakeman on the C., L- W. road, who was making his first run, fell between the cars at Chamberlin Tues- day afternoon. His body was out in two and both arms and one log cut off. Ho leaves a widow and two children at Flushing, whore his father owns COO acres of land. Three years ago tho dead brakeman was worth which ho inherited and run through with. of Timber Laml. Y., Sept. A from Olean, N. Y., says: Perhaps the largest single transfer of Pennsylvania timber lands in tbe rocont history of that tatc was consummated in this city yesterday, it being tho purchase of acres of land In Elk County, by S. S. Uullis. of this city, who pafd for the tract which was owned jointly by J. K. Flail, of Ridgoway; Andrew Kn.nl, of 8t Mary's, and Sampson Short, of North East, Pa. It is unquestionably. the large-it and most valuable block of timber stump in tho Pennsylvania hoin- lockbelt. _ A New Dully for Plttgburjf. PiTTSiimiGn, Pa., Sept. The pub- lication of a new daily morning paper, to bo called tho Sun, will be commenced in Pittsburgh early in October. It will bo an elght-pago, soven-column paper, to be sold at two In politina tho new journal will be Republican. I is editor will bo Mr. C. D. Urigham, one of tho host known newspaper won in tho country, who has long boon identi- fied with Pittsburgh papers. .-'loiion in a Coliiory. TKEMO.VI, Pa., Sept So. -A violent ox- plosion occurred in the Fogor Kid 10 colliery near this boroiijjh, yesterday mornir.g. Tho inside workings wcro sot on fire anil tho force of nisn all thoy could do to oxfcing-iis'i ibe> Thomas Ward, of Uranchdalo. was killed by tuo explosion, having boon literally roasted to death, -lames Lewis and Albert Millor wore horribly burnad and way die. _ Union Ticket Sopt. Tbo ex- ecutive committee of the Union Labor party mot in secret session liorii yester- day and decided to placo tno following ticket in nomination: Govcrno, Theo- dore P. Ryndor, of Centre County; Lien- tenant Governor. Justus Watson, of Tioga County; Secretary of Intorr.nl Af- fairs, Henry K. Feller, of Blair. A now on a Charge at Fraod. T1FFJ5, O., Sept 26. C C. Godman, the Chicago dry goods merchant, with stores in Tiffin and Lima, who assigned last week, waa arrested Tuesday night on tbe charge of fraud, preferred by tho Tiffin National Bank. In of Sheriff Hepp be want to Findlay on a late train to secure bonds. at O., Sept Frank E. Smith, president ol Young Men's Democratic Club and head miller ia Warwick's mills, died suddenly Wednes- day morning of stomach trouble. His age was thirty and be leaves a widow. ZA9K.ivn.UE, O., a Sept Re- to box tbe wlftaar. McAnllffe hare Both SlaVin and tbclr consent to publican convention Ia the Fosrieenth district, Wednesday afternoon nomi- nated Benjamin F. Swindle, 6MM Grange lecturer, for Math ot an Brfftav. PTJTOI.AT, O.. J-V-Barrey 8. Hons. thirty-fire, editor of Forest BeTtew, one of the hett ktowm Ben la aorthwesterm fairs, Henry executive committee was named an-l platform adopted. ______ J Land Found. 0., Sopt. 25. -Tho Ptato Canal Commission has discovered sever- al pieces of valuable land in Newark, occupied by individuals, tbat belong to- tho State, snd will take steps to recover them. It is thought the land on which the Newark city prison belongs to the State, but the city's title to it will not be called in question until tho surrey contemplated by tbe commission-. is completed. _ Mn vnviue. PHILADELPHIA. Sept. 25. th" caaa of Charles Areutzcn and other pedilicn of the Krcntzcr Sonata who had beoa arrested on the charge Of selling scene literature, Thaycr yester- day rendered an opinion in which he do- tbat tbe relators bad committed no and discbatjre4 Utern. _ _ BnM at 8rr.nntWTn.TX, O.. Sept entered the of North Tniri street, and struck Lynch 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication