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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               E SALEM DAILY VOL. IL NO. 226. SALEM. OHIO. SEPTEMBER 24. 1890. TWO CENTS. Which Prevent an Agreement ea the Tariff B11L The Soffar Schedule and the Duty on Bindinf Twine are Stumbling Blocks. Likely Aw WA.SBTXOTOS, Sept 24.-The conferees on the tariff bill did aot Tuesday, but the Republican conferees held two protected conferences. cThe first re- sulted in nothing. The differences be- tween the conferees on the part of the House and the Senate have been nar- rowed down to the sugar schedule and binding twine. Just before the second conference was held, one of the con- ferees 01 pressed the opinion that a com- promise would have to be reached be- tween the Senate and House proposi- tions on both of the disputed points. A number of proposed compromises on sugar were discussed in the afternoon, but none of them were agreeable to all of those present A new complication %rose later in the day. The Senators from the Western and Northwestern to the number of ten, met and agreed to protest against the proposition to pnt a duty on binding twine for the purpose of effecting a com- promise with the House on sugar. Tbo statements of the Senators present at this conference as to the effect of it are jlightlv conflicting. Some of them say that it was agreed that if the conferees reported in favor of putting a duty on binding twine, the Senators interested would vote against tho conference re- port and refuse to allow the tariff bill to go through the Senate while the objec- tionable feature remained in it Others say that the ton Senators merely entered an emphatic protest against the proposition. The Republic- an conferees were in session at a late hour last night with the avowed deter- mination of remaining together until tome agreement Is reached. The con- ference report will not be presented to the House to-day. It will probably take st least twenty-four hours to prepare it for submission to the House after it baa been agreed to. The general Impression is that Congress can not adjourn before the latter part of next waek and that it will probably not get away before Oc- tober 6. TIGHTENING TUB COILS. Damaging Btrehali by Brother. WOODSTOCK, Ont, Sept 84. -The court room was even more densely packed when court opened Tuesday than it was Monday. Mrs. Birchall and her sJster occupied seats. Mrs. Birchall looks ten years older than she did last March, when she was a prisoner at Baldwin's boarding house at Niagara Palls. Sho Is very thin and pale and marks of suf- fering are indelibly fixed on her fnco. The grand jury in the case of Mrs. Birchall yesterday reported "uo bill" on the charge against her of boing ac- cessory to the murder. Birchall cania Into court with his old jaunty expres- sion. He was fresh shaved, dapper look- ing and as nervy as ever. Charles Ben well, brother of the mur- dered man, identified the false teotb and plate, the pencil case r.r.d placed in evidence, as belonging to his brother. He also identified the keys found on Birchall as his brother's, and said that with them he opened his brother's desk and two trunks. Ho iden- tified his brother's handwriting on the cigar case found near the bocly and also all the clothes worn by tho murdered man. IIo said his brother a tutor, .tudied a year in Switzerland, farmed a rear and a half in Now Zealand, then was idle two years before coming to America with Birchali. Two Contested Election OMei Decided. Democratic of the House ol Representatives Unseated. THE NATIONAL GAME. A Day's Doing's Among teadlnfc Profes- sional Following are the scores of Thurs- day's games: WATI03TAI, LKAGTJE. At York 7, Pitts- burgh 5. Second York 8, Pitts- burgh 6. At 5, Boston 1. At 3, Cin- cinnati 4. AMERICAS ASSOCIATIOX. At 8, Louisville 13. At 7. Toledo 4. At St. 2, St Louis 81. At 2, Columbus L Tardy Recognition of Arctic vTAsrrrxGTOs, Sept. a meeting of the House Committee on Naval Af- fairs yesterday a favorable report was ordered on a bill providing for tho rec- ognition of the services of Chief En- ffineer George Vf. Melville and the other officers and men of the Jeannette Arctic expedition. The bill provides for the advancement of Mr. Melville one grade and gives him increased pay. Suitable medals for other officers and men on the expedition are provided for. Steamer and All on Board Lost. VTIXMPEG, Man., Sept was received here Tuesday of tho wreck of Liontenant Governor Schaltz's steamer Keowatin on Lake Winnipeg. Tho boat left here in July last with a detachment of mounted police. A fearful storm passed over the lake on the seventh day after the boat was last seen and it is thought that those on board perished. So far as known only three men, all members of tho Northwest mounted po- "ce, were on board. Wire Pent to Sopt throo McGorty, Frank G. Ed fcunds and William for tapping Western Union wires on Ser> tetabor 17, for the purpose of swindling tie pool rooms, were yesterday sent to to await the action of the grand jury. Destroyed by Ttatt. BAD Ax. Mich., Sept from tho recent storm ia Huron Countj hare justcorae to hand. Hail fell to the depth of eight inches and literally wiped the The damage U at Manv of the are in a destitute condition. MvfllCfCF OXAJIA. Ed WUrjand, a f for a bakery, yesterday Sho IT wounded Attio Horlne, girl because sbe refasad to live biTTi. thea blew bia The won The rears old. aboat twmtjr- SOT HANDS. lnff Zl-iiiroad Oillclal Rospoiwiblc for tfce Statement of the M.ea Late Disaster. PHILADELPHIA, Sopt 21. Regarding ;be testimony elicited by tho coroner's ;ury in the case of tbo victims of the Shoemakersvillo disaster, Assistant General Superintendent Bonzana, of the1 Heading railroad, mado a statement yes- terday. "Conductor Edward ho said, "is reported to have stated that previ- ous to the accident hi bail rrado only two trips over the road. Ryan entered the service of the Philadelphia Read- ing railroad on tho main lino on Novera- twr 14, 1SS9, and prior to that time had had considerable experience on other parts of the road. He has running tetweon Reading and Potts uille and is familiar with that portion of the line. B. C. Kemp is said to have testified that tie had been employed in the capacity of rear brakoman but ono week. Kemp entered the service August 12, 1SS4, and has been employed continuously sines that time as brakeman, and con- ductor on coal trains on the main lino." O. TJ. A. M. Forty-fourth- Annonl Soiston of the tlonitl Council Convenes. BRIDGEPORT, Conn., Sept National Council of the Order of United American Mechanics begun its forty- fourth annual session yesterday. Tha council was called to ordor by the Na- tional Councillor, J. C. Smith, of Now Brunswick, N. J. The report of the Ka- tional Secretary shows the following: Number of councils at the last session, 357; instituted during the year, 98; dis- banded, 16; total number at present, 439: a gain of 82 during the year. Member- ship at last report, initiated dur- ing the year, reinstated, 326; ad- mitted by card, 118; total During the year there were suspended ex- pelled, 42; withdrawn, 258; died, leaving- the present membership a gain'during the year of The ra- port of the National Treasurer shows tho amount of cash in the treasury of subordinate councils to bo Sequel to n KomnnUc HEXDF.KSOS.KV., Sept Daniol Berry, a carpenter of tbis city, well advanced in years, brought suit for divorce from his wife, Amelia Berry. The action is the consequence of a ro- mantic marriage contracted by tbo oid man a year since. He advertised in a Chicago paper fora wife and caught one, a spruce-looking, middle-aged woman. She camo to Henderson and the t-.vo were married. The female sbarpor only lived with the old'gentieman three days. During that timo she bamboozlud him out of S1SS, with whicb amount she skipped the State and has not since been heard from. t> 9trevt Car. S-pt. Aa Og4ea mreaae by two  r-w Sept lantic passenger steamers are carrrir.? larjre cargoes of goods, eroorters aaxiost to start before October l. the date oi tte aew tarf5. Freights ba-ro frxra 00 to to shillings per ton. Tenable, of Vlnrlntn, to ton, and Miller, of South Carolina. Elliott. WASHINGTON-, Sept. O'Fer- rail, of Virginia was tho only Democrat In the critralior when t'.ie House met Tuesday. clcrt h-jvins called ilia roll announced the pain anil recapitn'rnU-c! the list of those votlnff. Syfitikor hesitate J before he announced the re suit, there tvro lacking of a quorum. t'-cnunded that tho result should la order to delay the announce- ment ReruhVor.'i ii'ter Republican rose and nno-'ito kna-.v how they were recorded, tfhe veto -was then 155, nays Quorum, and a call of the House wns ordered. Just us tiio clerk began calling the roll. Sweeney, of Iowa, one of the Republican ab- feute.'s.'ecterod and was received by hts col- leasrue1! w th applauds. Shortly af'.erwards Mudd, of Maryland rnnde his apperranee and recen ed a reception of mingled applause and hisses. One hurdrod :'.nd s'xty-lour members re- sponded to th.e cp.l! rmd without nnr announce- ment oC Uio result further proceedtops were dls- pcnsei with and the vote as.-uu recurred on up- proving Friday's journal. While this roll call was in proorffs and hisses were Riven wheu MHlikon eniereJ the halt For n time Cheadle. of Tudsaca. who is opposed to Lang- ston's claims, joined the absentee? and, located on a iounge in tho lobby, docUned to enter the chamber. But the requests and supplications of bis party associates proved too strong and upon this vctc he Irs name in the af- ariuativo. The vote 160, naysO clerk noting a quorum. The then recurred upon the first of the majority resolutions to unseat Venaole. It was 151, nays the clerk noting si quorum. Thon came the question on the seatincof L.ingston tind It was carried on a and Cheadle alone vot- insr In the negative. Mr. Haugen then escorted Langston to the bar of the House waile the Republicans and the galleries broke Into loud applause and cheers, tho Speaker admtnis tered the oath. Then came a chorus from the Republican side. "Call up another and in response to the chorus Rowell, of Illinois, called up the South Carolina case of Miller against Elliott. O'iPerraU raised the question of con- sideration and on a riva voce rote the Speaker str.tcd that tho louse had determined to co'n gtdor the election case. O'Ferrall made the poirt that there was no quorum prest-ut. The Speaker declined to entertain the point, stating that the lust vute had shown a quorum and that since then sevral Democrats had entered the hall. The previous -stion was ordered and despite a pro'est from of Iowa, tome reason for its adoption, should bft Riven, the resolutions unsoiunig Elliott and Heating Miller agreed to without division. Then the Houso wunt Into Committee of the 'VThole, ISurrows, of MlchL-ran. in the chair, on the Senate amendments to the DoUciency btu. The at'eriio'in v.-at, consuiueJ in a discussion of the French spoliation claims, the debate be ing participated In Dibble and Vaux In favor'of the Semite amendment, and by Messrs. Buckalew, Cannon and S.iyers in opposition Wltho-it action the committee rose and the House adjourned, tho Senate the resolution to In- vestigate the of women and cMldnn iu mills aucl factoi WBA referred to ft commit- tee. Several important measures were taken from the cile'iU ir passed, and the Court bill was furt'usr dc-b '.ted wlihout uutioo. GERMAN CATHOLICS. STRUCK BY A Three tlurlnd Into Etcrnltj- With- out a ErsiE, N. Y., Sept. John W. Lattin, ag-ed scventy-eigbt years; Wilson Vando water, ajod forty-two years, and the lattor's wife, aged forty, all of Pleasant Valley, this county, wore yesterday instantly killed on the Con- tral Now England A Western railroad track. At the timo the accident oc- curred they wore !n a two-seated vehicle driven by Lattin. The wagon was struck by the Boston express, whicb was half an hour lato. Lattin was thrown seven- ty feot and Vtvndowater and his wife tvcro still further. All three wero instantly killed and their bodies horribly mangled. Tke horse was killed and the wasjon demolished. Mr. Lattin leaves property valued ap 000. A Democratic Faajt. N. Y., Sept. The Thomas Jefferson building, the new homo of the Kings County Democracy, was dcdiiateJ Tuesday afternoon. May- or Chapin made tho opening address, being followed by Governor Hill, tbe orator of the day. Governor Abbett, of New Jersey, made a brief speech.. Only a small proportion of tbose who visited the building v.-crc able to obtain admit- tance and last evening Governor Hill held 3. reception in tbe building. Tho big chiefs of tbe party partook of a ban- quet at tho Hotel Clarendon. Convention of Republican Clnbu. PHILADELPHIA, Sept. At tbo con- vention of Pennsylvania Republican clubs held here yesterday delegates were selected to attend the national conven- tion of Republican clubs, wbicb is to rneot in Cincinnati in April, 1891. Tbo platform committee reported a set of resolutions, wbicb wore unanimously adopted, indorsing the National and State administration of affairs ol the Republican party and tbe nominees of ibo party for State offices. Shot by HU Sept Samuel Goldberg was shot and fatally wounded Monday night by Miliio Panhorst, aged twr-nty-two years. Tbo girl was en- rasred to Goldberg. The latter told Millie that his family and religion pre- vented his marriage to her in the regu- lar way. but that ho would marry her by contract. When refused b f rioters and plunderers roamed the streets. In dispersing those gangs the police found it necessary to fire upon them and several persons wore killed. The fire was uncontrollable from tbe start and swept with wonderful rapidity through" thVbiiHdlngs' in throe direc- tions, including the quarter devoted to private residences. Among the many public buildings destroyed are tho post- office and the steamship agencies. The guests in the hotels wore panic-stricken, but all escaped. The total loss is esti- mated at No lives were lost It is believed that the origin of the fire was accidental A Grant Memorial Proponed. WAsnrxGTON, Sept Hale in- troduced in the Senate yesterday ajoint resolution "that a memorial building whicb shall be a monument to tbe mem- ory of tbe illustrious soldier, distin- guished President and patriotic cltiren, U. S. Grant, in which may be established a military and naval museum, library, a hall sufficiently largo for conventions and rooms for the accommodation of tho various associations of war veterans of tho United States, and in the innor court may be placed tho mortal remains of U. S. Grant and other distinguished Americans, be erected in tho District of Columbia." Maney'n Nomination Confirmed. WASHINGTON, Sopt Senate in secret session yesterday confirmed the nomination of Goorgo Maney, ol Tennessee, to be Minister to Paraguay and Uruguay. A long fight was made on tho nomination of Mancy. Mr. Manoy antagonized one wing of the Re- publican party in Tennessee at tho last Presidential convention and the opposi- tion to his confirmation was urged by Representative Ilouck. The charges against hira were his personal babiM. After a long discussion tho Senate by a decisive vote confirmed tho nomination. It has been pending in tho Senate sinoo December. Worst Krer Known. WASHINGTON, Sept Depart- ment of State has received a report from tbe United States legation at Pokin China, which says that the floods in that orovinco have been the most serious 3ver known. It is supposed that an irca of 300 miles and a population o several millions have been affected by the floods. Maty people have been Irowned and tens of thousands are ref- atfces from their homes, living on ;harity. of All.. SeM.t4. ol raia ose of tbe heaviest erer la ttU sectiox y agssaofVOTor two and halt tbe twelve Cottoa to fliMfiift by falling rain. VHWTA, Sept. ain to frotter M wxrcrrwL cr0w4 With thi conference committee jester- Jay afforded an Interview to Erastns Wiman in connection with Canadian re- ciprocity. A conclusion was reached thai nothing should be attempted this vessfon. fcnt that ia tbe event of a disso- lution o? tbe Canadian Parliament the sbocld Barliest consideration at the reassoro- blicr of Coajross in December. and TOSK. Sept trial of Dr. Mra. Shaw 6ns Harri- j MB. caarfed with of Annie Goodwin, tho by for STKACTSR, N. Y., Sept Monday aight in the town of Stockbridge, Madi County, John Stroeter was brutally by some unknown persons supposed to be his bop pickers, whom be was just about paying off. Streeter's body was found some distance from his lop kiln in the field yesterday morning A large amount of money was taken from his person. Another SvteMc la Mto. Sept Major Von the commandant of the cadet school ia this city, committed saiclde Monday night He took a dote of poison and then opened some of the arteries ia bit body. suicide of Major Norman following 90 ckwely om several ottwr startling by prominent persons witbia the past week has caused a foand senaaUos. Prison wfU Met bcre for a of several days, Borrow. A Minor of Recent Erents In eyedom. CAPTURED TWO ENGINES. from Roaad ROOM Vy Marshal. ZAXESTFLLX, M. Last Novem- Mr the Zanesville A Ohio River load Company took possession of two belonging to the Shawnee A Kuskingum River road, now a part ol the Columbus Eastern, which wore lUndtnjr on a side track at Malta. They brought them to this city and dis- mantled them, claiming that they wen purchased with funds belonging to their company. United States Deputy Mar- hal Hyscll came down from Columbus at one o'clock Tuesday morning with s mndred employes of the C., S. A; H. and a replevin for the locomotives. They arrested everyone at the round louse, put the engines in running shape and took them to Columbus. The Z. R. officials remained in ignorance of the affair until Hysoll had got outside of tho city with the engines. MASONIC CONCLAVE. Meatlac of the Grand Council and Orand Chapter of tbe State. MARION, O., Sopt Tho Grand Council of Ohio, Royal Arch Masons, met in this city yesterday with nearly every in the State represented. In tfne evening tho exem- plification of the Royal and Select Mas- sera' dagree by the officers of tho Orand Council took place in Masonic Hall, which was followed bv the Super Ex- cellent. degree by Past M. L G. M. Henry Theobald and others, assisted bj mem- Mrs of Marion Council No. 13. To-day the Grand Chapter will meet icre and in tho evening the order of High Priesthood will be conferred by officers of the Grand Chapter. An in- lormal reception will be held this ng in the court house by the Masonic bodies of this city. Combined to flffht the OH LIMA, 0., Sept There is a rumor afloat that the object tho Manhattan Oil Company had in view in removing their headquarters to Toledo was to con- solidate their interests with the Sun Oil Company, whoso headquarters aroin To- ledo. Both those companies are strong independent concerns, and being com- pelled to fight tbtt Standard, could do so nore effectively by consolidating. At ;he office here the rumor is neither de- nied nor confirmed, and it is undoubted- ly true. The combination of these com- panies will make tho strongest opposi- tion to the Standard in the Ohio field. Top of Her Itn OtC LIMA, O., Sopt -John Minnick and bis wife went to church, leaving their little children, the oldoat aged seven years, alone. Soon after their departure l young son of Joseph Linogcnjor, a neighbor, came to the house with a double-barreled shotgun. Ho hold it up and asked the little Minnick girl to look Inside the barrels, which she did. Just then the gun was discharged and the en- tire top of her head waa blown off. Died from niood StnKEY. O., Sopt 94. II. Mid- dleton, a prominent farmer, was buried Monday. Twenty years ago ho frozo one of his big toes. It gave him but little trouble for eighteen years, but after that he suffered intensely. Tljree months ago ho bad the member ampu- tated. Blood poisoning followed and his death resulted. IIo was seventy- seven years old, and had livod here forty years. Application for a Receiver Uanlod. YOTTSOSTOWJT, 0., Sopt Repre- sentatives of tbe Herancourt Browing Company, of Cincinnati, marie applica- tion in Judge Oilmoro's court Tuesday morning for the appointment of a re- ceiver to take charge of the business of John F. Ilynos, their aeent hero, claim- ing ho owed them on account for boor furnished. Tho Judge, after hear- ing tbe allegations, dismissed tho apnli- cation. _ Took the 0., Sopt Rev. M. P. Bofl, Vicar General the diocese of Clove- land, conducted one of tho most solemn ceremonies of tho Catholic church at the convent of the Drsuline Sisters Mon- day, conferring the veil upon six your.g Is4iet, four taking the white, or proba- tionary order, and two the black, or em- blem of complete and final separation from tbo world. Vardered and BoMwdL 0., Sept Fonr masked robbers entered tbe house of John Krlmm, an aged farmer living near Glb- sonville, Hocking County, struck him and his aged wife with a blunt instru- ment, robbed the botjso and escaped. Tbe old man died from his injuries. Ifo clue has been obtained that is likely to lead to the arrnst of the robbers. LATEST NEWS HUMS. by Tctecmprt From all at Earth. WEDNESDAY, sKlTEJtTOR 24. At Palmer. Mass., threo businew blocks were burned tho other day. loss is General Boulanjter's forthcoming1 re- ply to his detractors will consist of a book containing about 200 pages. Tho race horse Reclsre was acid re- cently at auction at tho N. Y., track to Hough Bros, for 515.0.''0. At Chicago tho National has formally accepted Washington Park as a portion of tho site for tho Y.Vr'.d's Fair. Throe persons wore killed and i injured by tho explosion of potr -ura lamp in a workman's house at re- cently. A commercial panic prevails at Lis- bon, Portugal. Tho leading b-vr.o J arc in a precarious condition and a adsit is imminent. Thomas G. Prosser, a woll-knovrn railroad contractor of St Louis, has boon nominated for Congress by tbn Ko- pnblican convention in tho dis- trict i Two thousand minors at Troppau, Austrian Silesia, have gone on st-ilce. Trouble is foarod, and troops havo boen dispatched to tho scaao to pvnorva order. Hon. Charles W. Stone has boon nom- inated in tho Twonty-sovouth Pennsyl- vania Congressional district bo fill ihe vacancy caused by tho death of Ri.pro- sentativo Watson. Excitement has been caused in tbe vicinity of Mantacho, Austria, by tbo discovery of enormous silver there. There is a rapid influx ol people, and groat speculation in land values. The Comptroller of the Currorxy has authorized tho Marino National liankof Duluth, Minn., to begin business with a capital of and tho First Na- tional Bank of Girardvillo, Pa., Mr. Parnoll desires to wait until after tho trial of Dillon and O'Brien to see whether It will still bo possible for thorn to go to America, believing the dolay will not affect the object of their mis- sion. His health will not permit him to make a personal visit to America. The Brazilian episcopacy has pub- lished an energetic protest again? t the reforms which the republican govern- ment proposes, aimed at tho Cafcliolin church. One result of this hostUiny, it is declared, will be tho suppression of tho Brazilian legation at tho Vatkun, Tbo House Committee on Judiciary has decided to make a fuvoruhlo report on tho Senate bill for tho forfeiture of the property ol tlio Mormon church. The bill was introduced to carry out a decision of the United States Suprame Court delivered just before tho adjourn- ment of its last term. Tho bill passed the Senate. at TTFTLT, O.. Sept Mrs. Eliza B. Childa, of Bacyrus, died of dropsy at the residence of her son, ex-Commissioner Cbilds, la tbis city, Wednesday, ia bar aiaoty-aevcntb O., Sept licaasof the Eleventh district yester- day by acclamation Jsdge D. W. Loodoa, of Covnty, for CMS- CniCAOOs Sept. ty, who WM 99 MrtoMly wovadod to pistol dswl with Jim tatt Saturday ai.fr t> dirt toy wornlay. to rsBprvrtaf. tbo will M ta tbo rtBanrsty. Karl Nominated NKW YOJIK, Sopt. Tho Democratic State Committee mot yesterday at the Hoffman House, all tho members "beinjj present but two, who wore roprcson tod by proxies. Thocommittuo ly renominatod Judgo Robert Ei-irl for Judge of tho Court of Appeals. I xploiilnn M S1OO.OOO NKW YORK, Sopt ia tbe Standard Oil Works at Cavan Point, Jersey City, wore destroyed by a fito" which broke out early Tuesday mom lug. Tho loss is estimated at 'i'ou fire was the of an explosion, Polishers on a Strike. PiTTsnur'.'iri, Sopt. m pol- ishers in tbo finishing department of Jones Laughlin's American. Lroa works wont out on a strike yesterday morning. They demand ten hours' pay for nine hours' work. THE MARKETS. Flour. Grain rrOTfefon. YOUK. Sopt. at 3-- percent.; lowest2; Excli.ive closed uluady. Posted rate; KVit I8SI.4. actual rnt-s JTJS-JSOli for sixty C. .1 3 and I5MK for demand. Government bonds closed ftrnr Curreccy at 114; 4s. coupon. 4tfs flo at 103V4- Cf.F.vBt.ASD, Scpt.23 at Minnesota pnteat at Minnesota spring at 8 rod at 99c. No. 4 red ct O'-c. 8 mixed at We, woatorn yellow at 2 white at-Cc, Xo. 3 white at 41 c. creamery daffy I8a, York at at 9o, fresh at 20c. at par bushcL Krw YORK. Sept. and' prices Dhow no marked change. City mill ex- tras ss.00515 33. Minnesota extra at W-SKfr- 1.36. at V auperliDc at No. 2 red winter at IL04 cMb, October st 
                            

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