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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 23, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 23, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SAI.EM DAILY NEWS. I VOL. IL NO. 225. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 23. 1890. TWO CENTS. i rnfi? IT A Lira Al The Crfebratod Birchall Murder Trial The Alltffed SUytr of BeuwoU FMM His Answers at Woodatook, Ontarios A JnrT Compel for the Crown Explains Wbtofa An to Onllt. WOODSTOCK, Ont, Sept the marvellous nerve that has characterized his every action since his arrest, and has made him the wonder of all who have come in contact with him, Joan Regi- nald Birchall faced judge and Jury in tie Oxford County Court of Assizes here Monday and pleaded not guilty to the Indictment charging him with the mur- der of Frederick C. Bonwoll in a dism-.l swamp near the village of Princeton oa February 17 last. His bearing was in keeping with the circumstances sur- rounding the crime, which almost out- rival the wildest work of fiction, and was planned and executed with a consummate coolness that is personified in the man. There is intense interest in the case and the town is full of strangers. The court room can not accommodate one- tenth of the people who desire admit- tance. The ablest legal talent in the country engaged on the Tho work of securing a jury occupied about an hour. They are all farmers except one, who is designated "gentleman." Shortly after noon Crown Counsel Osier opened the case for the prosecution. He gave a detailed history of the crime and stated the points which the prosecution would attempt to provet. In brief, they are: Birohall left Buffalo with Benwell on the morning of February 17 and after an absence of ten hours returned to Niag- ara Falls alone. He was the last man seen with Benwell on that day. Eh was seen at Eastwood on February 15 by several persons, although be denies be- ing there. told the officers that he had received a letter from Benwell dated London, February 19, Inclosing a receipt for his baggage and asking him to take It out of bond, Benwell was murdered on February 17 between the hcurs of twelve and two o'clock, so he could not have written such a letter, and Birchall has been unablo to produce it He told the that Benwell was dressed In a suit of blue on Febtu- Rry 17, but Pelly swore that he wore the clothes fonnd on. the body in the swamp. The officers found In BlrcbalPs trunk a pair of nickel scissors with a nick in the edge, and tho marks rn the dead man's clothes indicated that the names were cut out with the same scissors. The keys of the murdered taan were found on Birchall and these keys were in Benwell's possession when he loft Buffalo on February 17. He wrote a letter to the dead man's father on Feb- ruary 20 in which he" he had spoke to Benwell on that day; that tho young man was well pleased with the (arm and that he had decided to enter into the scheme, at the same time asking the father to cable at once. Yet in the lace of this Birchall told the officers that he last saw Benwell on February IT. Mrs. Blrchal) did not appear in court. TVilliam McDonald was the first wit- ness. McDonald said he became ac- quainted with Birchall when tho latter came to him as a farm pupil from Eng- land. Birchall was then known as F. A. Somerset. He stopped at McDonald's farm one day and then went to Wood- stock, saying he was not brought up to such work. McDonald's evidence threw considerable new light on pupil farm- ing business. He admitted he was agent at Woodstock for Ford, Rathbun Co., of England, who sent pupils to places on farms, the farmer getting S125 bonus and the agent the farmer re- ceiving half "that amount at the end of the first month that a pupil was satis- fied, and tho balance at the end of six months. Douglass Pelley, a young Englishman accompanied the Birchall-Benwell party to this country, followed. He told of his arrangements with Birchall to enter Into farming partnership is Can- ada, and said that Birchall told him he had a farm near Niagara Falls of 200 acres: lived in good style: kept English servants: had a good brick house and one of the stables lighted by electric- ity, also speaking of his overseer as a fflan named McDonald and two brothers saaed Peacock, who worked oa the farm. McDonald, tho previous witness, said that the Peacocks wore myths. The witnesw first met Benwell at Liv- erpool. Bircaall said Benwell was a nuisance; that he was taking hira oat as to Benwell's father, and that would put him on sotne farm and get of him. The trip of Birchail and from ftuffalo oa the day of the mnd BiTcball's reappearance nlffht were told. Birchall ABSENT COKGUESSMEN that Bircbail B England and jrouid start ia week. tw 23L Tbe Oakland abost three Tailes from the basl- staler of the citr. sospended yemertay. LiabiUties aevets frj.ooa The crediiori at per cent. Tbe closes park bank, a braach of the OakJaad bank. Sept. vet HafgOTtf. who tfcoi a Clark street saloon 3aV to to declared a Triable fur the Domt- Party .A CiMM Conttden WASHISGTOX, Sept The ineflect aal efforts of the laanagers of the Honse to secure a quorum of Republican mem- bers in order that thw deadlock on the LanfSton-Venable contested election ease could be broken, was the cause of another Republican caucus yesterday. The caucus lasted nearly two hours. Discussion on the subject of plans for securing tho attendance of Re- publicans was general and Mr. >fooro, of New Hampshire, proposed that ab- sentees should be fined 5500 each. So- vore condemnation of tho absent Repub- licans was indulged In. A count of absentees brought forth promises fros a number of members that a bufScient number of thoabsoctyes to make a quorum woald be present to- day. Some members urged aban- donment of Langston case, but this action was opposed by most of tho lead ers and it was determined that the case should not be dropped and trnt adjourn- mont should be postponed until Langs- ton is seated. OS THB DJ VMOND. Results of Co'itMM on League, tlon and nroiltcrhootl Following are the scores of games: :s.A.TIOXAL LEAGLK. At Chicago Brooklyn 1, Chicago 14. At Boston 4, Cleveland At Wheeling, W. Pittsburgh 3, New York 8. At Philadelpiua 1 Cin- cinnati 5. Disastrous Fire In ft Cleveland Refinery. Nearly a Scora of People Injared by the Buniimr Flnii At St Rochester 4, St. Louis 1 At Syracuse 3, Toledo 4 ten j innings. I PLAYERS' I.EAOUB. At Philadelphia 10, Buffalo 9. At New York 0, Pitts- burgh 3. At Boston 10. Chicago 2. AtCleveland-Brooklyn 1, Cleveland 8. CONG AL. In tho af Representa- and WASHISGTOS. ?2pt. There were but two Democratic prooent when the Souse was called to order j-osterday O'Ferrall, of Virginia and ol Ariiouu. The call of tbf roll on jppro il of Jour nai resulted ye.is IV, no.ie.no quorum: so a call of the Honso or.lTpd; 1ST mem- bers responded ti tticir nimoK Sttll no qairuta and a absjatoos MoKmlay an adjournment, which was carried The S-natc, nfter tbe transaction of some routine business, resumed consider uioti of the bill to rtofln" and rejulato the jurisdic- tion of the United Statri ciurts The bill wns discussed up to within a few moments of journment and then weat without action Tbe Senate, after a brtof exeeutlre session, ad- journed. _ Charferrt With Arnou, LTTTKXE. Minn., 2i. Miss Neuie O. Willoughby was arrested yes- terday as sho was about to board a train for Florida, charged with causing the flro in tbe barn of John Cameron, January 17 last Miss Willoughby is an authoress of some note and is verv prominent here. She has also lectured on "Social Purity." It seems that a girl named Owen confessed that her mother and Mrs. Freeman, a sister of Miss Willoughby. set fire to the barn and that Miss Willoughby paid thorn S30 for tho deed. at the Stock Yards Strike. CHICAGO, Sept Switching at the Stock Yards Is once more at a standstill Monday afternoon all the engineers em- ployed by tho new Stock Yards Switch- ing Association left their posts and ro- fused to do another stroke of work Fifteen engines were left idle and tho yards were completely tied up. This action on tho part of the engineers was brought about by the refusal of the as- sociation to discharge a couple of non- union men in their employ. McAnllffo and Slavin tVill Surely Fljrht LOXHON, Sept 23. At a meeting tho Pelican Club yesterday Lord Lons- dale and Richard K. Fox decided that should Slavin and McAuliflo fail by the interference of the authorities to brine; off the fight in the Club, rather than seo the match fall through will each put up tho original purse offered by the Ormonde and bring the fight off on the continent, with a limited number of spectators on each side. _ Boy Romstfd to TROY, Y., Sept A fire which caused the death of a young boy and the injury of several persons started late Sunday night Strait's vill.i. nbout a mile beyond the eastern city limits. Tbe house was burned to a. complete mass of ruins, as no water was at hand to atay the progress of the flames. The boy burned was Ralph Manchester, the ten-year-old son of Mr and Mrs. George N. Manchester. A Spark frora a Pmslng the Ettt- mnted at Over O, Sept spark from a locomotive was the cause of a larg-e fire at tho Excolsior oil works, on Bessemer avenue, Monday morning. It was ai about o'clock, when tbo night who wure just tearing the noticed smoke issuing from the warehouse. An showed tlat f1-" building on flre. The alarm was given pending the arrival of a hand apparatus was 1.. ilio omployes, but to no ef- fect. In tho nioan'iruo the flames had soread to tho b'o icK'nj house .ind from there across a switch track to the oar tanks. Tv.o chinos wore soon on the grour 1, but Tny water had boon thrown thoir hose broke in several places and by the time it was repaired it lajkeu a few minutes of boing o'clock and other engines had ar- rivoa. At three of the car tanks ex- ploded, throwing the burning oil every- where aud injuring nearly a score of people. of tho tank, which was constructed of iron an inch in thickness, weighing- 1TO pounds, were thrown a dis- tance of several hundred feet One piece went through a shed and another crushed through a bystander's hat, juat his hr..d. Within the next two hours sovoral other tanks oxplodod. The tanks Contained from fifty to 300 barrels of oil ench, and there were thir- tcoii on the .1 majority of which exploded. The tanks were located on a hill, down which the oil ran In rivulets. Tho fire vis thus extended to the paraf- flne dry-houses, which burned like tin- dor. An underground pipe, leading from one tank to another, exploded. Several firemen, "-ho f'oro standing near by, were thrown violently to tho ground by the force of tho concussion, but escaped uninjured. At noon tho flro was under control, but it will ho sovoral days befofe the flames can bo est.ingiiished.-', Two large tanks containing 4TO barrels of gasoline escaped tho flames. The following is a list of the injured: Albert Darro-.v, a pumpman, back and a.rms.burned. it is thought he can not recover; John Rheinhanit a fireman, bead and hands burned; Frank Blazek, hands very badly burned; Thomas Davis, hit on the head and back with flyin? pieces of the tank; flenry Schneider, hands and face burned; Joe Mather, hands and arras severely scalded; George Schneider, bands and burned; John Bloch, hands and face burned; James Tracy, face and scalp scalded; Joe Flannigan, face bad- ly burned; Harry Francis, face and hands badly burned. A large number of others whose names could not bo ob- tained, were slightly Injured. Concerning the loss to the company, nothing like a correct estimate can be mado. In conversation with a reporter tho sariormrcndont said: "Our plant v.'as worth about and I believe tbat it has for the most part been de- stroyed and renlerod valueless." Con- tinuing, ho said, "I have no doubt but that a spark from a Cleveland Pitts- burgh locomotive caused the flro. The track runs close to tho warehouse, and an online had pasgcrt by but a few min- utes before wo discovered tho fire." t the CmcAGo, Sopt Judze McDonnell yesterday decided tho motion to quash one of tho two In tbe quo war- ranto brought In the name of the people against tbo Chicago GM Trust Company in favor of the petitioner. Counsel for the defense argued that the ttro were conflicting and therefore could not be maintained, but Jadge saw no reason wbj both counts should not be prosecuted. or Sept The fourth convention of tbe German Caibr olic coagrese will be formally opened ir, this city LMt there was torchlight parade, It. 000 persons being in iiae. Delegates are ia Pittsburgh Tcpreacatlsg nearly erery State in the Cnioa. AfVer tbe parade lut night a monster aaasi meeting held at Grand Central Riak. Coul i Vot on it Verdict. BCFFAIA Sopt jury In tbo case of of Ma ils came into court Monday and reported that they were unable to agree on the sentence as to one or five years. Judge Coxo tulci them they had nothing to do with the sentence and were only to de- termine tho guilt or innocence of the ac- cused. Ho then sont them back for fur- ther deliberation. Tho jury soon re- turned and reported that they could not possibly agree on a verdict Tho judgo thereupon discharged them. Tnnmpii   of the train. An of tho cartridge Showed it to contain enough explosives to bare :he train io atoms. ClementV Ghastly PiiiLADELpniA, Sept John B Cleiner.ts. fifty-eight a rnoin- cf the printing firm'of Planty Geac-ats. city, coajmitted at his place of business ysmiday br shooting- bisaseif tarotifh tbo head. He icft a note saying: "i m fond of a joke, bat this is tbe last one I will try to crack." Dall businew to Ibcufht to have been tbe caaae of CHICAOO, M.-WOlUoi Fardy, convicMd of rf Aamael Reininger, WM s> trial b ledge OrtnaeU to TOME. Soft eall of tbe Municipal Betorvi for a tueoUnf of clergymen to the local po> Mtteal aitaatiaa At tesponded to terday by UrM wnober of clericals. who met in Halt Father Ducey, of St OatboUe church, called tbe to order and la bis Introductory iqfearks denounced tbe of tfeia olty as a disgrace and a reproach ita pastors. Dr. BL H. Crosiy enlivened the meet- ing wiih a cbcraoteristie address ia which he humorously depicted the mon- strous corruption of New York munici- pal government Father Huntington offered a resolution that the league sup- port no candidate for mayor not in- dorsed by a majority of tho labor organ- isations tbe city. Dr. Crosby opposed Father Hunting ton's saying that he was op- posed to anything in the nature of on- tanslin? allianoea. A heated discussion followed. Finally, however, tho coil was untangled by the passnje of a lutlon invitinjf tjse co-oporatlon of all labor organisations. MUItDEKBD AMD ROBBED. Fwrpetrated by Two Who From Their Victim. DOYLESTOAVM, Pa., Sept A labor- er named Heflaor, employed on the rail- way In oourM of construction from Hartsville to New Hope. Bucks County, while on his homoaboutono o'clock Monday morning in company with his wife from a visit with his brother, who keeps a boarding house at Rush Valley, was waylaid and choked to death. ETeff- ner and his wife Were walking on the track when two then confronted them. Tho woman was told to go home and mind the babies, the men saying they had business with her husband. They pushed her aside and she fled to Rush Valley and informed her brother-in-law. When they returned 'Hoffner's dead body was found lying on "the track. Eight hundred dollars In money con- tained in a belt worn by the dead man was missing. The murderers escaped. A FATAL CKASH. on ft Renulti the of an BBtflnewr nod Snrl- Iijnry to Other Trainmen. ST. Lotrts, Sept 23 Yesterday after- noon a rear-end collision occurred on, the Wabasb .tracks near Forest Park, just inside, the city limits. The Denver express fan Into the local accommoda- tion of the Colorado road, which had stopped to their swUohtnan. C. W. Howard, of- this city, of thf Denver express, was killed instantly and J. S. Cioslan, his fireman, badly hurt Fred Dusford, Pullman conductor, seriously hurt; Joe Nelson, newsboy, badly injured. Fourteen others were slightly injured, mostly from St Louis. Indicted tiy a Jury. BUFFALO, N. Y., Sept 2S. The coro- ner's jury investiga'lng the oauao of the death ot Charles Kelley, who was found on September 7 with his skull fractured and other injuries, and who died the same day, reported a verdict yesterday that ho Came to his death by criminal means and that Daniel Oarvoy, Matthow Burgess, 'John Doyle, Daniel Burns, William Connor and John McDonnell are guilty thereof. They were arrested and an examination on Thurs- day. _ Sntclded hj the Route. SANFORB, Me., Sept 23. Sylvester Cummings, a wealthy retired manufac- turer at committed suicide Monday by taking laudanum. Cum- mings was indicted by the grand jury last week for burning a barn at Shom- leigh and was arrested and put under bonds. His counsel called at bis house yesterday morning and found him dead. lie left a letter denying tho barn burning. _ _ Olllccrg Klectnd the TOLEDO, O., Sept 23. Much time was spent yesterday by the Brotherhood of Conductors in considering the life in- surance feature, but no definite action was taken. Tho following officers were elected: Grand Cblet Conductor, O. W. Howard, ro-elocted; Grand Secretary and Treasurer, D. J. Car, Los Angeles, re- elected. Jacksonville, Fla., was selected as tho place for the next annual meet- ing- _ Ao to Illinois SrnrxoFiELD, IlL, Sept Patrick McBryde, member of the executive board of tbo United Mine Workers of tbo United States, has issued a circular to the miners of Illinois declaring tbat the price for mining coal In this State is lower than paid la other parts of the competitive district; requesting them to ask for aa increase, and if necessary to strike. _ ___ _ The Sixth tutmtttf. CmCAOO, Sept Minnie Pilgrim, twenty-two years, died yesterday. making the sixth fatality resulting from Sunday night's collision between Illi- nois Central and Chicago, Burlington A Quincy trains. The body which was un- identified Sunday niffbt has recog- nized as tbat of Albert Otto, a boy 3f- years to be FALLS, 31. Y.. Sept Cal Woods, the murderer of Pasco, who was on Friday last sentenced to death by electricity. WM yeaterday taken to Dan- netnora prison, there to await the tioa of bis avRtrnce, which event it sot for some Uae tbo week of Xo- veaabor BAtTMosm, an of the Maryland and a weli-kaowa lawyer, who tram S OF THE STATi Mirror of Happenings la Ohio Towns. crrr vs. o AS COMPANY. Between Tlffla and BaiMd hy OU Trrra, a, Sopt A struggle be- tween the city and the Northwestern Ohio Natural Gas Company, backed by the Standard (Ml Company, has been In- augurated, which promises to be long and bitter. The Northwestern holds a franchise for furnishing natural gas to domestic consumers, and the city pro- poses to build a competing plant The first movement was made when the city tried sell a hatoh of in bonds. The sale was declared illegal on tho double ground that the sale had not boon properly advertised, and that the pro- posed issue should have boon submitted to a vote of tho people. This will pre- clude the possibility of the work boing commenced this season. Candidate to bo TIPFIS, (X, Sopt The Farmers' Alliance has finally determined upon taking Independent action In the Eighth district and a formal call for a conven- tion, to meet at Carey on Thursday, Oc- tober 2, has been issued for the purpose of nominating a candidate for Comrross. The Alliance is ?ery strong In the coun- ties composing the district and It is conceded by the leaders of both the old parties that this movement will compli- cate matters greatly and leave tho final result more uncertain than before. M ordered. SOUTH CnARLRSToir, Sept 83. As some boys were fishing near town Sun- day they discovered an object floating on rtbe water, and .upon investigation found It to be a, sack containing a girl baby about ten pounds, nicely formed. Tho authorities npon being notified hold a post-mortem, which dis- closed tfaat the child had boon healthy; and bad been smothered to death before being thrown, in the water. The afTait is a mystery. Chqrnh Dedicated. Sept The new Metho- dist church at this place was dedicated Sunday. It built at a cost of 000, and at the services in the morning were raised in Httleover an hour.. which leaves the new church free from debt ROT. Dr. Moore, editor of tho Christian Advocate, of Cincinnati, looked after subscriptions and conducted the dedicatlonal exercises. Celebrated NOBWAIJI, 0., Sept Kel- logg, probably tho oldest citizen in Ohio, who lives ton miles aouth of this city, celebrated his one hundred and fourth birthday Sunday. He came from Ver- mont in ISIS and has lived on tho same farm nearly three-quarters of a century. His health is remarkably good. He re- tains wonderful memory, and eats three hearty a day. at Work. Mr. STEBLWO, Sept A gang of horse thieves made quite a raid here the other night taking four good driv- ing h or see and buggies. George Wilson, Tull Alklre and Will Dennison wore the losers. The thieves not bnon ap- prehended as yet A horso that was stolen from John Crookham two months Ago was found in Cleveland and returned to the owner. Hog Cholera In Greene County. DAYTOS, Sept Farmers in tbe vicinity of Spring Valley are losing all their hogs by cholera, and the pres- ence of tho disease is reported west of there, toward the Miami rivor. If open weather continues tho epidemic will become general, for there is no known cure for bog cholera. Awarded. YotTjroSTOM'ir, 0 Sopt. 23 jury has awarded Robert Camnboll damages against the Ohio Iron and Steel Company for Injuries received while funning a train into tho yard of tho company. Tho plaintiff claimed that the accident was caused by a guard rail being insecurely fastened. Tramp Thrown Under the Sept 23. Donovan, a tramp, attempted to board tbo west- ern express on tho Pennsylvania road in this city Sunday afternoon and was thrown partially under the wheels. which crusted bis right elbow so severe- ly that tbe arm bad to be amputated near the WILL GO IT ALONJS. Murderer Shftrfcev fteprlorvd. COLUMBUS, 0., Sept Governor Campbell yesterday reprieved until No- vember 14 Elmer Sharkcy, tbo Preblo County matricide condemned to dlf Sep- tember W. Strong medical testimony was presented showing1 that Sbarfct-y was insane at the time the crime was com ID J tted of the 1'Bteiit WAsuryoTojf. Sept Mr. Mitchell, tbe Commissioner of Patents, has made a report to the Secretary of tho Interior of the operations of Patent Office daring the last fiscal year. Tho receipts of tbe year amounted to 81.347.203, and tbe expenditures were The total number of applications received for patents, including reissues, designs, trade marks and labels, was The number of granted was Krw BfroroKTv, Mass., Sept Word kM Jast been received from Point Barrow, Arctic Ocean, that Pwtnrwse n> of Pacific WbaiW Company, was there by aa Esquimaux who kM of Georgia attentions m- x WOBMML murderer T -n.: 1 by court of Inquiry femn after of McKinlejr Tariff Mill Mfeot rjpoa In MOXTKEAL, Qte.. Sopt. The first public official utterances regarding-' Can- ada's attitude towards tbe McKtnley Tariff bill were delivered at political picnic at Sherbrooke, by Min- ister of Finance Foster, who said li T re- frettftA that the United States would not arrange some fairer measure of re- ciprocal trade than we now have, Lut-U the McKinley bill was to bo the policy of the United it only remuiuod for Canada to depend npon hervilf. develop her own resources :md other markets tfian- of the LTiited States for goods forcibly diverted from ihat country by iho provisions of tho McKinlo? A great dfal of the trade would -to u> Great Britain. I'.o was also proparod to say that a very larjjo and pro'.iiaMu market stood open in the West Ir.diiia for tho products of Canada, the vei'y nroducts the heighten -si tarifl has been placed by the Mates. Thi'ii tliuro was iMiigo for ipintf our trade in China, Japan and Australasia. IT KILLKD TWO. unit SUror K'lloit trr Tlnltrft from ATtnchetlcr Kille. Tex., Sept. Puriag 'arnos Ledenham's absonoc from his little son was found in tho r.ird olaylng with his father's VVinchf'hjr. An older daughter attemptod to "-akto the weapon from tho buy auil tbi- gun was accidentally discharged with fatal x effect The iall entered the ijojis mouth and passed through his killing him instantly. The girl hurried into tho house for assistance and oa entering tho door fell ovor the body of her sister. The ball, after work of death in the yard, p ifo'd" through tho weather boarding of tho honse and killed the second momlcr of family. The ball took effect in tbe rear part of tho girl's head and lodged in hoc mouth. TUAINMES'S ALLIANCP- n nnrt Coiirtnctorn on A NorthniMtern flritpm Cnmhtne Tbrlr Foroen, with of -t.OOO. CHICAGO, Sept, The And conductors on the Nortbwes torn system, which comprises the Chloa7o A Northwestern, tbo St. Paul. Minneapolis fe Omaha and tbo Fremont Elkhorn Missouri Valley railroads, miles of road, have (or mud n 'JOLD- blnation which will bo known as tho Association of -the Ocotherhopd of Loco- motive, Engineers and tli e Order of Raitl-   stndy on special linos in European cen- tres of thought resuming a linf> of study which the assumption of a charge filtcon years ago forced to suspend. _ X. Y., Sopt following has broa at station on the New York Hudson Hirer railroad by order of VK, President Webb: 'To all agents- -On and after September 20. any promotions on tbe road must be made from men now In tbe enploy of cornpauj. ff yem need now men yon may bire them. la no case are yon to employ maa who left tbo company Aafiwt CCTT, Rer.? Sep't eroof Charles C. of died yenerdaT of tythoid heM pilule offlevs. iteatti at v If I -f :t I -If H I H It i   

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