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Salem Daily News: Monday, September 22, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 22, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 224. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 22. 1890. TWO CENTS. Gatbered Among Excurslonlsta Keturulng from ft Picnic. Carelessness Canses a Railroad at a Chicago Suburb. Dis- Jerioswly Injured, Owtoc to C., W. Q. RipreM CMMhlac Into ma IliinoU Central Tfmto. CHICAGO, Sept persons dead, two dying and five seriously wounded was the result of somebody's carelessness "at Douglass Park station lsst evening. Shortly after seven o'clock a train on the Illinois Central road stopped at Kenzie avenue. It was the last of four sections which were wWng home a crowd of excursionist bad gone out to Addison to enjoy thuiusolves. At Clyde the train was -tin onto the Burlington tracks, and at Douglass Park station it stopped. As i- bickod toward tho west the Downer express on tho Burlingion road cr.tue thundering along, and before J brakes could be set or alarm given tho j pilot of the Burlington engine went i craabiujj into the rear end of tho picnic train. Tbo second car was a light suburban ono. The one behind and the one ahead of u wore regular passenger coaches, a great deal heavier. When the Burling- ton train struck the rear coach of the train it rose from its trucks and plowed over tbo tinderbox in its way. For ten (eet it was a complete telescope. Tbe heavier coach behind cut down the light one in front as though it was an egg shell and the human beings in its way wore ground to death or cruelly in- jured. Four persons were killed in- stantly and seven others were injured, two of whom will die. Many others were slightly hurt and all aboard the picnic train and the Burlington passen- gers were thrown from their seats and severely shaken" up.' Following is the list of killed and Injured: Killed: Lily Dinnier, eighteen years old; Martha Dianier, twenty years old, a sister of Lily; two unknown men, one apparently about eighteen and the other twenty-three years of age. Fatally wounded: Minnie Pilgrim, twenty-two years old, both legs broken and some iternal injuries; Otto Schloff, eighteen, years old, badly crushed, not expected to lire. Injured: Louis Torpey, leg broken; Albert Bergo, foot crushed; Henry New- man, face crushed; Tillie Burke, collar hone broken and internal injuries; Freda Roswick, left leg crushed. Had the Burlington train been run- ning at a high rate of speed every pas- senger in the car would have met in- stant death. Citizens carried most of the killed and injured into the little depot before the police arrived. No sooner bad the accident happened than tbe conductor of the Illinois Central train uncoupled the telescoped cars and with the rest of his train drew into Chi- cago. The police at onco sent word to the Central station ordering the arrest of all the train Robert Dixon. the engineer of the Burlington train, in an interview said: "1 am positive there were no red lights displayod on tho rear of the Illinois Central train, and the flagman did not flag us. I had every reason to suppose 1 was running on a clear track when I went into tho Tear end of the excursion The tendency of those who saw the Accident was to put the blame on tbe Central tnunmen. Robert Dixon, the engineer of the Burlington train; Jack Valsb.', his fire- man, and Conductor Ray, of tho same train, wore arrested last night No one uu trio Burlington train was hurt, in 'act ihc train itself was scarcely dam- aped. A MOTOTACT OF TYATEB. Two Ixnt and Ship by an SAX FIIAXCTSCO, Sept. British Ship Ventura put into port Saturday in distress from a hurricane encountered September 13. Tbe Ventura sailed from. here August 6 for Westport, Irelrnd. On September S the captain noticed signs of an approaching storm and pre- pared to meet it. The wind and sea in- creased all night, and in the rcorr.icj there was a fearful gale blowing. Every Shred of canvas on the yards v.-as whipped to fragments and the ship flew along under bare poles. Suddenly an enormous wave was scan approaching. It was over 100 feet hicrh. It towered over the vessel for a cioinoTit and then passed clear over it. Every thing movable was washed away. Tho I iron door of the leo cabin was crushed in as if by a battering ram, ar.i tbo cabin filled with water. Two men, Paul Vol. an able seaman, and Juiiu Saoto, a sailtnaker were swept over- board. Tho wash of the v.-avo threw Snoto far to the leeward. His ship- mates saw him clinging to a piece of broken boat, but could not help him. After a number of hours the wiudbeyan to shift some the earjo and right tho ship. From then on it had fair weather while returning to this city. Takaa from the Wreck of UK Heading Express. Work of Somoving tho Debris Goes On ami Trains are Roiling aa Usual CRIMINAL LOGIC Suicided With Morphine. MiXf.TOX, 111., Sopt Fannie McMillan, who was recently granted a divorce from her husband, FrM McMillan, of New York, manager of Fay Tcmpleton, died Sunday morn- ing from the effects of a dose of rnor phlnp which she took Saturday night She was the daughter of W. H. McMil- lan, of Hamilton, 0., who is a million- She was a cousin of Governor Campbell, of Ohio, and the mister of tho of Congressman Morey, of Hamil- ton, 0. One year ago Mrs. McMillan at- loapied suicide by chloroform. Sleeping Trainmen Killed. N. Y., Soot ?xtra train on tbe Erie road stopped at Summit switch, just west 01 Midi'.etown, to allow an express to pass. I- "-3 supposed that the conductor, tBM and trainmen in toe caboose of the -reigbt train wore all asleep, having nts.ucied to send out a Sag. The was that the express train as :t rounded the curve dashed into the rear the freight wain. Ths caboose was crushed and the conductor. Charles Lop- and the flagman. W. U. DaJTr. 'ore instantly killed. Indulge hi Ky- Sept 'Viiiiams. ex-sheriff of and George S. THROUGH A TSESTLB. Frightful Drop of u Freight Train Throajrh a Burning Men Killed. OMAHA, Neb., Sout Freight train No. 97 on the Wabash, from St. Louis, was wrecked early Sunday morning by going through a burning- trestle, fifty- live feet high, about ten miles southeast of this city. Twelve cars loaded with Sin ware, hardware and other rnerchan-. diae, one tank car of tar and two cars of beer were totally destroyed. Six cars were saved. The engineer, Martin Esk- ridgo, and the fireman, .Toseph Burke, both of Stanbury, Mo., were killed. Eskridgo was crushed to doath under his engine and was burned to a handful of ashes and bits of bone. Burke was pinned down by a truck, covered with tar from the tank and literally roasted alive before hie horrified comrades, who were unable to extricate him, and them- selves sustained severe burns in the at- tempt The head brakeman, R G. William- son, was thrown over two cars and struck on the engine, from which he re- bounded into tbe bushes. Ho received injuries from which he died in two hours. The burning of the bridge was probably due to a spark from an earlier train, thoujrh some are inclined to think it the work of an incendiary. ABTHUtt INDORSED. Course of the Grand Chief Ap- proved nt a HoQiter Meeting of Knights ot the Lever. NEW YORK. Sept. 22.-The grand union meeting1 of the Brotherhood of Loco- motive Engineers, which is in tho naturo of a national convention, was hold at Lyric Hall, in this city Sunday. Two sessions wore held, both of which were addressed by Grand Chief Arthur. At tbe morning session men were present and in the afternoon and divisions were represented from Maine to California, and from Can- ada to iPanama. Chief Arthur was ro- ceivcd enthusiastically. Ths following resolution was passed: Resolved. That. It is the of tin tfnion that TO tbe instruction g.vtn b: our Cr.inl CSlef Engineer to tho ,n_inf. rs J.i-f ing the Into trouble, nnd we have full confidence in the engineers on the New York Ontrul rr: 1- road in following tbe Instructions trivon by our Grand Chief Engineer nn'l in do to the laws and rules of our hrr.fiprhood. From to l> .ii by UELEXA, Mont.. Sept. or Bozernan was launched at n Friday and on Saturday Commodore A. C. Hitt started on a trip in her to tho coast of Florid.i. Tne steamer was built of mountain fir within the shadow of the mountain where the timber grew. She is twenty-three long. Sij-j b cabin accommodations for tnrr-o per- sons. The trip is connected with a sci- entific treatise on the subject of shallow river navigation and river obstructions. Scone of the DlKfttter VUttKl by Bunds of of Injured Com- Fifty REATHXG, Pa., Sept Inde- scribnblc horror of Friday night's wrtok on tht> Pennsylvania A Reading railroad noar Sb.oomakors.viHo was more fully revealed Tho engine lay in four t of water the body ol the engineer, John. While, still pinned bo- T.io engine was battered out of. shape and its machinery bent and twisted like a toy. The tander, bag- rasje, mail cars r.ad coaches aid in the succession in v.-'iich they left the track, tho timbor-> broken and the cars overturned, pinning the unrescuod vicurns in a doath embrace at the bot- om of tho rivor. Tho distance from the point the engine left the tracks, going down tho stoop twenty- ivo-foot embankment and then dashing the rocky bed of the river, is fully foot, that tho train at the time of the accident; must have been going at a terrific spoed. Tho work of searching for bodies was carried on without cessation. Tho number of sodics rocovnrod foots up twenty-one. The body of George R. Kaorcher, gen- eral counsel for the Reading road, was taken out of a wrecked parlor car. Ths wreck is said to havo occurred in tho following manner: A down coal train separated abovo Shoemakoraville and another coal train following after ran into the rear section. Two loaded coal cars wore thrown over on the other track just as the passenger train came dashing and the engine striking this obstruction the wreck of the pas- senger train followed. It is estimated that tho passenger train was running at a speed of sixty-five miles an hour. A large majority of the victims, both dead and injured, belonged in tho coal region along tho Reading railroad. The list of injured now comprises about fifty people. Engineer White and fireman Tcmplin, who were kiliod in this dis- aster, filled the places of Louis and orcQ Heller, engineer and fireman, who lost their lives on the same train in the wreck at Tuckerton, on Juno 23d last. The persons injured in the wreck who were transferred to the Reading hos- pital arc being taken to their homes as rapidly as their condition will permit and last evening there were only six re- maining in the hospital. Tho scone of tho wreck was visited Sunday by thou- sands of people. The damage to the tracks has been repaired and trains are running as usual. Those whose curiosi- ty prompted them to visit the spot yes- terday were rewarded by seeing tbe loco- motive moved from its resting place in the river to a point near the bank, while the debris of the broken cars, which had been dragged out of the water, was still lying along the bank. To-day tho coro- ner will begin his inquest It is not probable that anything now will be Tho anastor is regarded here as bavin? Imin purely an accident Died in the PuJpit, Aunov. Y. Y., Sept G. T. Cain, paster of the Presbyterian church at this place, went into tho pulpit Sun- day morning in his usua.1 health, an.: had proceeded through hilf sermon be paused and without warning foil to the floor. Tie never re gained consciousness, and expired !n about ten minutes. Ileart disease was given as tho cause. He successive! held charges at Erie, Pa.: PoilauclpUia Wiiliamsport, Pa., and 0. Death of .Tohn H. Woodfmry. Sept II. jry assistant editor of tho Youth's Com- panion, died Sunday morning at tho residence of his son-in-law in C.iai bridge. Mr. "Woodbury was years of was horn in Barro. Mass, came to thirty years azo. and hac been connected with tho Youth's Com panion for sixteen years. His doatl was caused by cancer. Incrunted 111., Sept. McBrydc, of the Executive Board of the United Mino Workers ol Ai-vnca. r-amo hero Punrlr.v, and to-day will issue a circular nailing on tho miners of Illinois and Indiana to make a demand for tao Columbus scale o pricr-s. This inra-ns an advance of cents a fin in Northern Illinois and a proportionate advance in other districts of the State. If this tlumand is no' complied witu by tbe opc-rr.tors a pen eral striko is to be ordered to go into effect November 1. IV-ad In the flAKTTOXD, Conn.. Sept Wreck on tho H. O. COS.NKLI.--VILLE, Sept. 22. ol the biggest freight wrecks in the bn tory of the Pittsburgh divipion of tbo Baltimore Ohio railroad happened Sunday morning at Upnning station twelve miles west of here. Engineer Jamos Saioldjj wj.s kiliod and fireman Harry Cyphers probably fatally injured. Tierce othar trainmen were injured. I. u. O. National Encampment. SYKACUSE, N. Y., Sept. Woodward came here from Albany yes terday and after consultation with tho in charge of the matter ar rancrcrner.ts wero made to hare tho na tior.al encauipment of the Independen Order of Odd Follows held in this city iurinjr tho second week of July next I 'ia tbat at least members wil attend. Sorith TAXKTOK. S. D., Sept. Reports from twer.ty-or.o counties in South Da kotx where threshinj 5? in progress Fhow that the yield of small grains is tl.aa at first supposed. It aver ages fifteen bushels to tho acre. Corn was uainiirred by frost and will yielr ousaels per acre. Although 'P- farz'jrs rc-aliaoniore produce than for many In by Bell Boj With of YORK, Sept A striking btory Of -cool criminal logic was told at the Jefferson Market police court Sunday during the examination of Henry Cas- ain and Oscar Matthews, the two bell boys of the Hotel Vendome arrested foi stealing the contained in the Strong box of bookmakers Carlin and Savnders. Matthews turned State's evi- dence and told how Cauin secured pos- session of tho money. He said Cassin approached him seyoral times with a plan to take tho box from the safe. Cas- sia said he would be willing to serve ton years to hare the money, which he eould hide and use when his term ex- pired, as the sum was more than ho would be able to earn in that time. Cassin said he could easily get the as he knew the combination of the te, but Matthews declares he refused to have anything to do with the scheme. Cassin was held in SlO.OOi) bail nnd Mat- hews was sent to tho llouso of Do ton- ion. _ _____ BASR BALL. Latest Among the Loadiua Pro- Following aro tho scores of Saturday's games: SATTOX.VA L.EAOUE. At Bo ton 1, Cleveland eleven nnings. Sflconrt fpime Boston 0. Cleveland 4. At Brooklyn 9 Chio.igo 0. At Cincuinutl-Philiae'.phln 1. Cincinnati 9. At New Yorii 0, Pittsburgh 5. PLAYBHS' LEAGUE. AtBufTalo-Philadalphln Buffalo 5. At New York 14. Pittsburgh T. At Chic-igo -Boston 9, CUloURO 3. At Brooklyn 10. Cleveland 5. Second Biooklyn 4. Cleveland 5. AMERICAS ASSOCIATION At Baltimore 5, Columbus 8. Baltimore 2, Columbus C. At Athletics 4. Louisville 23. Athletics 0. Louisville 10. At Toledo-Srrncuse x, Toledo 7. At St. Rochester 3, St. Louis Innings. SUNDAY OAMB9. At Brtltlraore 7, CoHimbns 8 Seeoud 4, Columbus 7. At Alb le tics 4. Lou'svillo 18. Athletics S, Louisville IB. At St Rochester 1, St. Louis 12. Second Rochester 0, St. Louis 9. THA1N WBECKEKS' STORY. Oaett Reed Impllcmte In Th-lr Crimp. YOKK, Sopt The Sun puh- Lishes a six-column special dispatch from Troy embodying1 toe sworn confes- sions of three of tbe men arrested on the charge of wrecking the Montreal ex- press on tho Now York Central railroad near Castleton, on September 4. These nteu, Cain, Buett and Reed, relate c'r- oumstantially the story ot their placing tbo obstructions upon tbo track, and implicate the other two men who were in'ciistoiy, Cordial and Klernan. All of tbe men were prominent strikers and Knights of Labor. Cain and Buett were arrested in Prescott, Ont, whore they had fled, and state that the money with which they wore enabled to roach there was furnished them for that purpose by Master Workman Lee, of D. A. 240. OVER-STUDY CRAZED HIM. Brigadier General Grlerson's Snn St. Loulg A Sad ST. Lours, Sept About a week ago Brigadier General Griorson arrived in St. Louis from Los Angeles, Cal., in search of his son, who had made his es- cape from a private insane asylum at Jacksonville, 111. Friday evening the police arrested an Insane man who was terrorizing women and children. Satur day it was discovered that tho prisoner was General Grioraon'a son. The un- fortunate man is deranued from ovor- gtudy. He was remarkably bright in his younger years and secured an-ap- pointmont to the West Point Military Academy, tie was unable to finish tho prescribed course on account of brain troubles and returned home. afterward ho became violently insane. Continued TVAsniNGTOTf, Sept Filibustering tactics on tho part of the Democrats in tho IIouso led to an early adjournrnen Saturday. Tbe journal was read with out objection, but O'Forrall objected to its approval. Tbe yeas and nays having been ordered on this, there was an ox of members on the Democratic side of tbo IIouso and in a'momcnt their seats were deserted. Tho vote resuitct yeas im, nays none no quorum ami the House adjourned. _ Actrein and Her ArtUt Lover Cretnnted NK-.V YOKK, Sept. 22. Tho bodies o the youny Gorman actress, Emilie Ros si, and her artist lover, Gustare Koch who committed suicide In asonsationa manner on Thursday last, were ere mated at Fresh Pond, L. L, Sunday. number of friends of each of the deac accompanied tbo remains from thoir late residences in this city to tbe ere matory. Family Polionod. 111., Sept Tbo family of Henry Varner. living near East Lynn and consisting of himself and throe small children, all became suddenly and violently ill. Tbo little girl died, ono of the boys can not recover and Mr Varner's condition is precarious. i new pump had just been placed in ih well and a oxaminatSon disclose' the fact that rat poison had been put in tbo pump while lying- at the country store, to kill raw. jvolver emptied con- a: hiai, bat sisaedhia) every tinie. re-turned flm Mi planted ----ec ballets ia William j' body. CTTT, _.r_ ._ eraor Charie. C of Nevada. -'lv tyjnoid fCTcr. He bas oj rescaiaj parIj W. Irj Pa., Sept ex- plosion of fM in the Murray sbaft of tae Lchiffh and Wilkesbarre Coal Company Patsrfaj the alnft on firs. Edward Batsos was oct bally A tie Tbey aa4 nported that for.r tPtra deal itlr Ont, Sept tbe Uurlir.srton. Kan., e a vigorous fight when has Vjen taken back by de- The extradition proceedings bare cost Kansas screral thousand dol- lars. the aajoont In the said to be aboct TIKOBZ, Sopt of the Maryland Senate and a lairyer, who WM ac- cused of trust toads, disbarred by bench, Candy is te hto MOOBBM M4 kM left Foirr Sxmt, Ark., Sept a f.crce storm in the Boston Mountain a party of ton Tcrk% who were travel ia? south with a Jot of dancing boars. in s creok bottom in one of hea-ry storm rent in tbe rarlao and seten of the asen and all the bears were drowned. Col LA PLATA. Ma, 3ept Fe freight collided new here Sat Brmketnaa Oill WM ._ MMUy killed Md OM of eaginwn Md txls firemaa wtn danfrerotisly in jured. Both enfiMf Against tbe Tariff BUI Sugar Schedule. Ail Expert in Such Matters Says the BUI M it Now Stands Opoiu the Door for The If U a Com- plete Surrender to Foreign Ramnly Sunreiited. WASHIXOTON, Sept Brown, he noted ox-Treasury Department sugar expert has sent tho following lettor. embodying a vigorous protest against tho tarilf bill sugar schedule, to Senator Aldrlch and tho tariff bill conferees: SAXONvnAE. Mass.. Sept. 19.1990. Hon. N B Aldrlch and members of tlxe tarlJ conference committee, in Congress: Ttxe slons of tho suuar sobfHlulc of tho tariff bllS as. the bill came from the House nnd it now stinils with Senate amendments, Is a complete surrender of the people s interests to jreign producers and sugar refiners and is already of as such by them. The remedy "s In your Admitting all sutmrs not above No. 13. or not Ko. 13. Duton in froe of duty without restrictions, ugain open1; the doors :o roloratlon which wore the bill of March. 1SS1 arter sit IK. of constant flijhtinii by writer. It Is lot a question but that all sugars not above No. 10 will be imported for refiners an If thf llnp No. 13. D. S.. all foreign sugar vlll color thPlr sugar to evade tho duty. Only bastard yellow sugars if any. p.ly to oomo in reftned below No. 10, D. S., ind even oan not compote with the high that will come In free of iuty to reflnnrs. who onn than produce yellow nnd undersoil foreign yellows. There will bn no Imnorted that are not Vo 10 or No. 13. D. S.. in color, as under :henew -cbcdule 'he old coloration frnuCawill je renewed in full force, and be protected by law. There should be n proviso .lomcthmc: as fol- lows. "Provided all not above No. IS, of IB, Dutch stnndnrd in color, testinir aboTe eighty decrees in tho polnriscopo. shall pay a duty of three tenths of a cent pound, and :wo'-humlredthH of a cent per pound additional 'or everv doeroe or fraction of a degree elKhty dagreet." By pome tuch proviso tbe Government maintain control over Importations of snpar and protect tho Intwuts of tbs people. With- out some the bountv plan will irove a furce. and consumers irlll be at tho of foreign producers ind rcflnors of sugar. The proviso will also afford gome protection M molasses boilers Tho for of ;ht> 1899 91 croo of domestic snsar before the bill roes into effect should bo extended to May 1. 1991. in Justice to producers of suears in thii country, who are entitled to too protectioa ot the present tariff to that extent ut least. SALOON DYNAMITKD. A Snnfnrd, Ind., Ola Mill Wrecked by an Qxplonlnn Women the Crime. Tr.RiiK HAUnt, Ind., Sopt at- tempt was made at an early hour Satur- day morning1 to blow up the saloon and grocery of Isadore Mulvaney, at San- tord, with dynamite. A heavy charge was exploded under tho front of tho building1, blowing down the doori, broalc- inft the bar fixtures to pieces and goner ally demolishing things. Under pres- sure of vigorous protest from nearly every resident of tho town tho county commissioners refused to ronow Mul- vaney's license and he appealed to higher court It is supposed that women placed the dynamite under the building, hoping to destroy it, on account of tho saloon having been tho ruin of many men in that locality. DEADLY KNIFE THKUSTS. Horrible In Hnttlmoro Untchor Suicide, BAT-TrMonF., Sept. Timothy Cor- bott on Saturday rushed into butcher's shop and. grasping two largo knives, plunged ono Into his body and with tho other hacked at his throat un- til bo had severed the jugular vein. lie then sank to tho sidewalk dead. Cor bett belonged to a good family and tho cause for his ant Is not known. lie was chatting pleasantly with his mothot when ho suddenly picked up jabbed it into his throat. Tho knifo bo ing dull and ineffective ho dashed down the street Into thn butcher's storo. whore ho completed his self-destruction. Monti incut to Orcoloy Unvollcil. NEW Yoiirc, Sopt. bronze stntue of Horace Groeloy was unveiloc: Saturday at tho entrance of tho busi ness office of tho New York Tribune Every available inch of space in Print- ing House Square was takon up b spectators during tho ceremony. Chaun coy M. Depow delivered tbo oration o the day. When Mr. Dopow finished hi oration Miss GabrlelloOreoloy, tor of tbo groat editor, pulled a corr and tho folds of tho American fla which covered the statue were raised disclosing tho founder of tbo Tribune in bronze to persons who had con gregatod in tbe square. In A Mull WrxsEsrccA, Nev., Sept. excitement was occasioned Sunday o- tho eastbound Southern Pacific train while lying at Ilumboldt by an explo- sion in tho mail car. A registered pack- age addressed to Anderson, Ten., tiloded while the mail clerks wsre at lunch. The opportune return of ono of the clerks prevented the destruction of the entire car. All tho letters and pack- ages in the samo box were scorched. On the examination of tho package it was found to have contained a conical shaped rubber tnbo which bad been filled with an explosive. GKAST> RAPIDS. Micb., !wpt. apparent of T. Gilbert tho roiKx.n- aire president of tho Grar.d Rapid? light Company, and a wealthy him- self, commitied suicide Saturday bypji- a bullet through his hovi. lil health unbalanced bis mind. lie a widow and three children. Sept. for a for- at at Octofctr M s; lllmoij !Iil- Mc- of iri'-iiig. aad s IATEST NEWS ITEMS. by From Part! tho -...i 1- '22. A native oi M-.Hi -i selling plans of tUc fo eigner. The condition of tho inr; trade in Great Britain is -..'.i 1 i busy winter. Seren rnmurs were kill'vi by tall- ng of a cago in the i'on.1 p't at Wittenburg, Saxony, recently. Tbe tulle of CnlaH, Trance, eighty in number, have locked out 5.000 of their employes for dcnirit: 1- higher wages. Lawrence E. Mi-Oann. TV- >een nominated for ConjjrL.- rrank Lawlor in tho Congressional district. Edward I'. M. Marum, Xati-.- Member of Parhamcat for Xorth cenny, Ireland, died recc-nily wu.l tending service iu church. Tho betting on the M.'AulifTo-S contest is live to in f.v.or o Aulitfo. Intoirust in cho upprca event is r.t tovor heat in b 1 Tho frequent sudden illii Charles of arc a1, t is fearuJ ihat his vitaalj foducod so low tli.it. ho cuii ne ir-ntly rally. Carjtaint'oorjo Maekon; 1' chess player, dyinsr with CIMV u: .ptioa in Manchester, England, bu iu- contly took part in an rn' choss touraatnout. Hates by lake and rail will bo ad- vanced October 1 by tuo Xortlnwst roiuls on grain, flour and m.'U -.lulls U> Now York, Boston, I'liiladelpUia, Haiti- more, Albany and Utica. Two more recently at Berlin. Count Von Schtiumburg blew his brains ouS with a revolver, and Jiarur. fioupor, u well-known sportsman, kiliod hiuj e'f with a similar weapon. Tho report that Gsraan tho fighting general of Plevna, was drowned in the Turkish man-of-war Enogroul i3 incorrect. Tho Osman P.islia who -.vaj on board tho ill-fated, vessel was a Vico Admiral in tho Turkish navy. Tho Census Office limls that tho popu- lation of St. Louis County, Minnesota, is In 1830 there wero only 4.504 Inhabitants in that county. DuluUi is located there and It phenomenal growth has helped to swell tho population of tho county. Mrs, EHhu Wing, wife of a farmer of Greontioid, X. Y, arrl of IJaniol E. Wng, a prominent toga lawyer, was burnod to doath in tho sitting- room of nor rosidouco near Sara- toga the other night, lior clothing caught Tiro from a lamp. A cable dispatch from London states that tho underwriters giver, ut) lost the ships Grotna and Tho former is out from San Francisco for the United Kingdom some two hun- dred days. The Oretna is out days from England for San Francisco. Two or throe weeks ago, Kohoo, a contractor on the Norfolk it We.-jr.ern railroad near Wayno C. II., W. Va.. skipped out, leaving debts unpaid. Among tbo creditors wore 200 Italian laborers. As a ro-iiilt of thocon tractor s flight, several man wore killed tUuutihur day. _______ _ Hroko thn World's ICccnnl. RiiAntX'i. Tit., Sept. A contost to brualc tho world's roi orct twonty-ono milos in ono hour an 1C toon occurred Saturday a-> v- won by William Van Wagoner, of tlii city, who covered tho distance in ori hour and minutes. W. f of Cloveland, was second, covering in distance in and C. M. Murphy York, nul.Uir.ff in There were twenty starters. TIIE JIAjlKETS. Flntir, (iriiln aiul Provision. NEW VOBK. Stpt percont. Exchanij'' cl Ifi'tVl. r.'l fordjRiitti'L Oovrjrn-ncnt (isntll4; IK coupon, ut Ul: POH' I" ioi-u Sept at pali'iil a' Minnesota spring :it No. red sit We No. ret3 'it Wo. No. 2 mixed at 54o. wcs-turn OATS-No nlxf No 3 white at-IK-. creimTT it Sir. dairv i-.t Yor'  Jcr it i'-TuC. POHK- 81 !Il.i PT'- --CATTt.r. at TO A ?l.5ri'W'0. an i a'. U rn t Wealt -V JO-WOT. at Market PV.'.rt -A u, so   

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  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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