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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 12, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II, NO. 216. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12. 1890. TWO CENTS. Takes Place During the Bautn Investigation. Conf ressman Cooper Characterized by Mr. Flick as Dirty Dog-." BttMcy the AdmtnUtrmtloa of Penilon Been Satisfac- tory to Interior WASHINGTON, Sept special House committee investigating tho charges against Commissioner Raum continued their investigation yesterday. Mr. Lewis opened the proceedings by stating that he had been informed on the day that he and Mr. Smyser had a dispute the chairman had characterized his conduct as ungonslomanly. Mr. Lewis insisted that his conduct on the occasion referred to was gentlemanly and if the statement had been made by tho chairman he demanded that he re- tract Mr. Morrill (tho chairman) s-iid that he did not remember making such a statement Mr. Iflielc said that if Mr. Morrill was a man of good nerve ha would not retract it Mr. Raum called Mr. Coopar and had him S'.vcrn. Raum questioned him as to whom had given him the information upon which he baaed hia charges, Mr. Cooper replied that tho matter bad first come to his notice through the newspa- pers: but, upon being questioned fur- ther, admitted that George B Florn- inlng, and others whose names he re- fused to give, had also told him about the matter, and upon this and newspa- per information he had based his charges. Mr. Flemming. ho said, had received his in formation from Mr. Fitjh. Mr. Raum then demanded that Mr. Fitch be recalled. In answer to a question by Mr. Saw- yer, Mr. Cooper said Flemming had told him that Tanner had stock in the com- pany and that he promised to give the names of seven other employes of the Pension Office who had stock in the company. He said ho did not know the correspondents who wrote tho charges. Mr. Flick began to question Mr. Coop- er. Beginning, be asked Mr. Cooper if ho was aware that ho was on his oath. Mr. Cooper replied that he did, and thought himself as good ai Mr. Flick and considered tho question ungentl.9- manly and cowardly. Mr Flick replied: "I submit that yon are a dirty dog." The chairman here called both gentle- men to order and tbe investigation was resumed. Mr. Flick took the stand again and positively denied that he bad made the statements said to have been made by htm to Mr. Flemming. General Bussey, Assistant Sacretary of the Interior Department was called by Mr. Raum, who stated that he had called Bussey to give a statement in re- gard to tho administration of the offl-.-e and the issuance of orders, especially the ones complained of in Mr. Coopsr's charges. Bussey said that he had fre- quent consultations with Mr. Raum with reference to the facilitation of business in the offloe. It was known, he said, that a large number of cases scattered through tho files were be- lieved to be complete, and It was the opinion of Mr. Raum and the other offi- cials of the office and himself that this class of cases should be taken from the flies for adjudication, and if they were incotnolete the evidence nesossary for their completion should be asked for, as otherwise they would be in tbe flies a while. Mr. Raum's administration, ho said, greatly pleased him and the office bad graatly improved under it. Mr. Cooper asked if the charge that Mr. Lemon had gone upon note had been brought to bis notice, and if he considered it worthy of notice. Bussey replied that he had seen the charge in the newspapers, but it bad never been brought to his notice officially and he did not deal with newspaper charges. He stated, however, that he had talked with Mr. Raum about the matter and Mr. Raum's explanation had been satis- factory to him and he sawnothing wrong in it The committee decided to ex- amine the 138 clerks who were promoted by Commissioner Raum and charged to be promoted in consequence of their holdina stock in the Universal Refriger- ator Company. Seven of them wore present and each in torn testified that they held none of tbe stock referred to and knew of no one who did. Anphj-xiated bj GM. NEW YORK, Sept Lawrence N. White, forty-five years old, of No. 33 West Thirty-second street was fouud dead in his bed Thursday morning. He bad been asphyxiated during the night, the gas having been tnrned on in his room. White retired somewhat under the influence of liquor and it is sup- posed tbe affair was accidental- FalUtl for Bstf a Million. CHICAGO. Sept The Chicago branch of the Eureka Silk Manufactur- ing Company, of Boston, has been closed by the sheriff on a confession of judg- ment in the Suprcrae Court for The entire liabilities of the coinpany will not be much lew thar. S.700.000. Tbe failure was caused by the recent of Potter, Lorell Co. Hta Ttirovt- YOXK. Sept Lar? Peterson, a Swedish sailor on board the man-of- war Yantic, lylatr at the Brooklyn nary yard, committed suicide yesterday by cutting his throat with a table kalfe. Ge Lad been on leareand is said to over-indulged la causing tempo- Insanity. Sept Jbird conference of the MethodUt charci of Canada opened here Wednesday. II ;s tbe first conference ttin cnkm ia and oaiy general beld here dartaf twelve yeara. are orer 500 delegates praemt. ii (THE TAIUFF BILL. :ne to he Followed by the for Its Consideration. WASHINGTON, Sept engross- ment and enrollment of the tariff bill was finished by the day morning a.ud General McCook, the secretary of the Senate, was about to start with the hill for the House when that body ad-ournod. The bill will be taken to the Ileus? to-day and tie Speaker will refer it to the Committee on Ways and Means, which may imme- diately hold a meeting to take action on the Senate A dis- agreement to the amendiEPTits will be entered by tte committee, '.vhic-ii wJi ask the Housd to request a conference. Until a quorum appears tho civ.nf.ittee will not ask for a conference. The Republican leaders in the House have decided to an adjournment from day to day until Republic- an members to niake a quorum have re- turned to the city. Telegrams have been sent so absent Republicans asking them to return at ones. It is believed that the oonforonoe report will bo be- fore both houbos by a week from next Monday. The Democratic members of the Ways and -s Committee have deter- mined to insist upon several days' con- sideration of tho tariff bill is the corn- mitten, and then allow tho bill to be disposed of as soon as possible. Pro- tests from importers against the bill go- ing into effect on October 1 are still aorning from various quarters. CONGK BY FLOODS .Loss of Property New York. The Highest Stairt? of Water Kuowu iu Tweutv-flve Years. In the -iniate and of Roprnsentatlren. WARSISOTOS, Sept. SENATE Tn ihe Sen- ate yesterday a resolution offered by Mr. Mof- gan oilling oc the Secretary of the Intortor for Informat'on as to the lands of the Northern Pa- cific Railroad Company nnd of other companies whose roads wore not completed within the period fixed by tho grar.tluj act, was tuliuu up, discussed agreed to On motioQ of Jlr. Pliirah the oonference report on the Railroad Land Forfeiture bill -.v.js t.iksn up. Mr. Morjr-13 opposed the report as a lo? rolling scheme potion up 'or the bcnclil of the jrant roads. After for "rpr four hours. Mr. Mor- gan said that he knew that the questions he had been cUb'. ware coins to their yrave In the o' thebllt but that he had desired to giVs thorn a decent bridal He Disced to erect a beudstone over graves of tho rights of the people on the line of the Northern Pacific road, so that the historic record nrcht he reaJ hereafter. He wanted to remind xhe people ot tho United States of the vast robber- p -rpetrated by that company, ivhich wns no'.v wound :ip and brought TO a by the bill. Ee knew what the Tote would bo. tho bill was the ror'e.tijre of ths v or'hem Pacific r.iilroa 1 lunds would b.; (lead an'lburloU and notimiT tnort- would be heard ubotit it. Without amshuic his spieuh, Mr. Morgan yield- ed for a motion to fidjoiirn. Tho Houso for l.vfc of a quorum, adjournodat 13 p. m -zriihoiit mik'tiir any progress ;hu Langston Vermble contested election case. COLD (XXVJFOJR.T (jlven by riiauni-oy Sf. Depew to Former of the Central Rnarf. ;w YORK. Sept 12. A committee of five of the ex-employes of tho Now Yorlc Central railroad who went out on strike called yesterday on President Chaancey M. Depew. "We have come to talk over the strike on the New York Central said one. "I'm afraid there is nothing to talk about The strike is -virtually over replied Mr Depew. The spokesman then asked Mr. Depew to wait until the committee had dis- cussed the matter, and said that they would then return and make their pro- positions to him. Mr. Depew repiijd: "There is no use in making false prom- ises to you. There la nothing more to be done. I do not care to talk ovor back numbers. You havo chosen to rosisfn your places: Mr. Webb has filled them and I ha TO nothing more to say The committee thon loft the office. Kl'lr-aper Indicted. KANSAS CITY, Sent An audaci- ous plan which contemplated the whole- sale kidnaping of children for ransom was revealed Wednesday when the jury found a true bill for that ofFenso against Henry C. Wilson, who keeps a feed and livery stable. The plan was to kidnap the children of wealthy parents, conduct them to a secret place in some distant State aad keep thorn there until their ransoms should be paid. Wilson took for an accomplice the coachmin of Mrs. Jeff Dunlap, a wealthy Mrs. Dunlap's three-year-old boy was to have been the first victim. Following are tho scores of Thursday's contests: XATTO7.-AT. LEAGUE. At 0, Chicago 5. Second game Cleveland 0, Chicago At Pittsburgh 0, Cincin- nati 2. Second Pittsburgh 1, Cincin- nati 4. At Philadelphia 1, Boston 2. At New No rain. All Association and Brotherhood Barnes were postponed onaccounlof rain. fndarrectloo In Switzerland OETEVA, Sept A revolt has oc- curred in the canton of Ticir.o. One member of the cantonal govemmont shot doad. three other members were made prisoners and the remaining officials Sed. Tho Swiss Federal Coun- cil have sent two batal lions of troops to suppress the insurrection- Tho trouble grew out of disputes regarding a revis- ion of the constitution- Crops Not Yot on All a Stntu'.Rtill. ELMIKA, N. Y., Sopt flood hero has dono thousands of dollars worth of in tho Chomung, Canisteo and fcho-ti-n v.V.'oys. The Inter-State fair srrou'j-ls t'ncJded with three feet of water and loss to the managers throug'; to 20 oiiiiLits if of Ad- dit-'-.n, o.i '.Vodnosday night a wager that he could ?'.vii3 ttie river and in- sanely plunged in. His body has not yet boon found. The -.viuer in the Cfinistoo river is tho kno-.vu in twenty- five and Hor- nellsville aro inundated and business is at a standstill. Reporis from B.ith say that tho Cohoc- ton valloy tho loss of property very great Railroad traffic is entirely suspoirlei on the Eric and Laokawanna A Western roads. West of here manv bridges have been swept away. The roadbed is washed out and -it various places along the road several foot of water covar the tracks. The Northern Central is not running farther than Watkins, and traffic on all roads entering the city is seriously delayed. CANISTEO, N. Y., Sept flood to virtually a repetition of the great flood of June, Jfo mails have been received since Tuesday night and there is not much prospect of any trains arriv- ing soon, owing to washouts between Corning and The of Nick Morwln, on Purdy creek, which narrowly escaped boing washed away last May. was this time taken into the creek and part of it carried down the stream. CUIJA, N. Y., Sopt were heavy rain1? hero Wednesday. Some damage is reported. Trains on the Roch- ester division of the Western Now York Pennsylvania road aro running through water part of the way. DAXSVIT.LE, N. Y., Sopt 12.--The se- vere rains of the past twenty-four hours have caused the Canaseraga river to overflow on the flats, so that tho crops not yet gathered will be entirely de- stroyed. SALAMANCA, N. Y., Sept very ruin bogsn filling on Tuesday night and _as continued since. Tho Alloghony river is rapidly rising and in many places the banks are over- flowed. Trains on the Erie road are abandoned east of here. Uuloss the rain ceases within a few hours we are likely to have as serious a flood as in June last year. ______________ Methodist Seiolnmry Destroyed by Fire. ROCHESTER, N. Y., Sopt Early last evening fire started in tho building of the Choosebrough Seminary, tho largest building in North Chili, about ten miles west of this city. The flames gained such headway that before any method of fighting them could be or- ganized tho whole structure was envoi- oped and thobuilding was totally ruined. Tho building was a largo throo-storv brick and was capable of accommodat- ing several hundred students. The school was rho largest institution under Methodist auspicns In the St.ato. Stabbed His one! SnicIdotL CiNi-iNNvr.', Sept.. A sensational suicide and probable murder occurred at No. 13 East Sixth atroet last night Hen Chase, colored, lived at the above place with his mistress, Ida Farroll, also col- ored, The couple frequently quarreled and while engaged ia ona Chase stabbed the -.votnan t-.vicewith fatal results. He then plunged tho knife into his breast and leaped from a third-story window and instantly killed. With Drowning nn true. ST. PAUL, Sept In tho case of Walter llorton, charged with drowning his wife, the testimony yesterday de- veloped noih'.r-g novr. Tho defense then, without submitting any evidence, moved a dismissal of the case on the ground of i insufficient testimony. This was over- 1 ruled and ilorton was held to the gran d Jury- _ Stoned ftntt Shot AC. YORK, Sept Wednesday afternoon when the Now York Central train was just north of Cold Springs, a bullet and a stone crashed through tho window of the middle ooach. Charles H. Smith, of Bingbamton, a passenger, was slightly cut by flying glass. No one on the train saw the persons who fired the missiles. No search wae Insti- tuted, as the train was going at full speed. Commit K. J- Sept 12. Horn. thirty -oae years. suicide Thursday raorniaj? by herself to the fanlight of rooai at her borne She was de- mented. her father, Frederick Horn, discorered fate of bis fcsr be himself in tbe bead with a rwalver, inflicttoj1 a fatal wound. BAMTMons, Sept convention of tie National Stonemasons' Union at Aznerica finUtrtd its labon yMterday adjourned. fiert will told at Syrmcnse, X OB tte flnt Moadaj ia Ttlnixj, 1WL Ontlttewk CITY. Mont, Sept Tbcro is fear of an Indian ontbreak at tho Cheyenne agency on account of tbe re- ported of a yoyng man. Tbe ezc'.ted and it i? said will make preparations to efJectsallj my uprisisjf. the- United States grand jury cptsaencod the investigation into the alleged census frauds ia St Paul. Sev- eral St Paul taea have beea before them ?o evi- deaoe. Tbe examination expected to last for several woe of oWM ago. cision ovyottf t.j ty. Tut de- DOMESTIC TRAGEDY. A Hatband'! ORfer of Reconciliation WIf _> Shot Second Bui- the NEW YORK, Sept Lenz, a German womr.a aged twenty-five years, was fatally shot in tho left lung at No. Stanton street last night by a man named Rosenberg, who afterwards shot himself in tho head, dying almost in- stantly. Roseabarg married the woman in Pittsburgh five years ago and they lived happily together until tho woman became inf.iiuat.cd with a grocery clerk in Brooklyn. Some time ago sho left Rosenberg- and went to live at No. 44 Stanton streot. During the day sho was engaged as i cook in Kolb's restaurant on Pearl street. Ahnut last night she reached her home from hor work and found Roroil.erjj waiting in front of the house for Tho two hii a lonr conversation, dur- inat which bezpod t.he woman to return and live with him. The woman told him they wore beuer o'J apart and refused to go with him. This angered Robt-nbcrg, and drawing a revolver from his pocket he firvd, the buUot entering the wo-nan's loft lung. She fell to the sidewalk without a word. Rosenberg shot himself in tho hoa.l, dying almost iinmudiately. Tho woman died In a few hours. SETTLED .VT LAST. Between t.lons in South t'lirnllim K-vIa In Till. nitvn's for Governor. COLUMBIA, 8. C., Sopt Tho Dem- ocratic State convention remained in session all of Wednesday night discuss- ing the report of tho committee on cre- dentials, which recommended the seat- ing of tho contesting Tillman delega- tions from Sumter, Falrfiold and Berk- ley counties. The report was finally adopted and about five o'clock yesterday morning the following Tillman, or farmers' ticket, wan nominated by avoto of 2SO to 40: For Governor, B. R. Till- man, of Edgefleld; Lieutenant Govern- or, E. B. Gary, Abbeville; Attorney General, H. J. Pope, Newborry; Secre- tary of State, J. E. Tindal, Clarendon; State Treasurer, Dr. W. S. C. Batos, Orangeburg; Comptroller General, W. Ellcrbee, Marion; Superintendent of Education, W. D. Mayflold, Greenville. It Is a singular fact that tho nomi- nees for Governor and Secretary ot State are tho only farmers on tho ticket. The Treasurer is a banker and physi- cian and all tho others are lawyer--.. There will be no split in the Democratic party. DIED IK THt: WilECIt. Von- Trnlnmen Klliml .met Thrno Injured Owing to MUplncttJ Switch on tho "fork Cc.-.Trul RoucL AI.BA.NY, N. Y., Sept. No trains have arrived here from New York since last night The explanation is given by tho fact that there is a disas- trous wreck at Schodack, sixteen miles below this city, on the Now York Cen- tral railroad. An extra freight train collided with a regular freight train, owing to a misplaced switch. The wreck is a very disastrous one. Two engines, ten cars and a caboose are piled up so as to cover the passenger tracks as well as the freight Two engineers, a fireman and a brakoman wore killed and throe others wounded. The wreck is on fire and is burning fiercely and traffic is de- layed. _ Trftlp C.tught la a SAX Tex., Sopt. Wed- nesday night passenger traiti No. 10, eastbound from El Paso on the Soutu- orn Pacific railway, was caught in a waterspout about fifteen miles west of Del Rie. The water, some forty foot wide, struck tho forward part of tbo train. It toro tho engine, baggage car and mail car from the coaches and car- ried them forty-five feet, overturning them. The passengers knew nothing of tho approach of the water until tho jar occurred. The engineer and fireman es- caped drowning by swimming to high ground. Tho track was torn up for 200 yards and a gully ton feet deep cut through it _ ____ Shot Dead While Breaking Down Door. NEW MIUFOUD, Conn., Sopt John J. Waters, aged forty-five, was shot dead by George Knowles, aged twenty-one, Wednesday night at Lancsville. three miles south of hero. Jay Knowles and Dr. David Knowles each claim the own- ership of a bouse left by their father. David locked up the promises ani placed his wife and son George on guard. Later Jay Knowlos came with a partyof neighbors and to break in tho door. George fired, killing Waters, who was In the party. Dr. Knowlos, his wife, and George Knowles have been arrested. Waters leavos a widow and six children. While m-ekiug Work. E. la.. Sopt 12. Wednesday evening Matt Wagner. Nic StcinmoU and Peter Maas leit this oity for tho purpose of seeking work at Menomineo, few miles sooth of East Dubuqno. Thursday morning their dead bodies were found about four miles down tho track and lying close to It The suppo- sition Is that they were struck by aa Illinois Central train. They were under tae influence of liqnor whoa they started on their fatal JOUTTIPT. Prom CAXTOX. O.. Sept ra'.a of the several days bw badly fiooded tbf> dtj. cspcciallj in tbe west- ern part Tajtrarawas strwsr is several water, partially cartrafUc. onder oon- rtroctkm CMMing heavy daao- Railroad traiat are all late. raontl O. vtar at tbto etty Thors- 4ay aad lodged ia Jail. to charged Jttb antaonhfeg ttWO of GoveraiMM fwajMMMr. UK that it VM wtoDT ttw haw caretm Story of Current Events In Thta State. DETAINED BY A GALE. to Put-in-Bftj- Moro of Outing CLEVELAND, Sept steamer City of Detroit arrived in Cleveland from Put-in-Bay at p. m. Thursday, when it should have arrived at seven p. m. Wednesday. There wore no evi- dences of a storm here, but at Put-in- Bay it raged furiously. About throe hundred persons left Cleveland for Put- in-Bay Wednesday morning to attend tho celebration of the seventy-seventh anniversary of Perry's victory. Many more would have gone had not A disa- greeable rain fallen just at tho time of departure. Tho island was gaily deco- rated in honor of tho anniversary. Tho spot where the bravo officers lie buried had Perry's laconic message, somewhat revised, painted upon a streamer as fol- lows: "We have met tho onomy and they are ours.'' Neither the Perry nor the Michigan wore present to take part in the naval fireworks. STRIKE ENDF.D. Nickel Vlate nt Clovolinrt Got tin" Worst of Cont'-nt. Sept 12. The strike among s-.vitchmon in tho Nickel Plato yards is practically at an end Thursday throe freight trains wore sent out and tho switching of cars went on aa ivoll as could be expected with the limited num- ber of men who were at work. The strikers stood -near the yards in groups all day discussing tho situation, but made no demonstration of any kind when the cars were being shifted from track to track preparatory to making up a train to be sent out Captain Madigan, of tho police force, and twenty men wore stationed in tho yards, but had nothing to do. Tho strikers remained about the yards, but the presence of the police the effect to prevent any trouble. _ Shot FT. EncovEuv, O., Sopt Frances, tbo sixteen-year-old daughter of Philip Clino, a fanner living six miles oast of this city, was accidentally shot in tho head with a revolver by her olevon- year-old sister Aggie, the bullet pene- trating the skull just back of tho ear. Tho weapon, which had never been used, was loft lying on a shelf in tho house, when tbo young girl picked it up and snapped it at hor sister with tho above result Tho wound is a very se- rious one. For TVrmHnont Camping Gronnd. Cot.tjMurs, O Sect. 12. wintor the Legislature appropriated for the purchase of 180 acres of land In Warren County, the purpose being the preservation of tho earthworks .sur- rounding tho historic Ft Ancient. The proposition is now made to make tho place the permanent annual camping place of the Ohio National Guard, and the Gonoral Assembly will be askod next winter to pass tho necessary legis- lation to effect this. Sept. A landslide one mile west of Loudonvllle, caused a bad freight wreck on tho Pittsburgh, Port Wayne Chicago at three o'clock Tb urs- day morning. A westbound train dashed into the slide and tho engine and six oars wore piled up. Engineer Frank Shinn, fireman Peter TJock and brake- man John Wiluv were seriously bruiiod and sustained a number of cuts all ovar their bodies. Traffic was delayed twelve hours. Klet-tcil. FHEMOST, Sept. The .State Coun- cil of Catholic Knights adjourned after electing the following officers for tho ensuing year: Spiritual Director, Rov. Cussac, Eaton; President, Joseph J. Pator, Hamilton; Vicn Provident, .lohn tferchnndol, Fremont: Secretary, An- thony Honkamp, Cincinnati; Treasurer, J. C. Phulan, Toledo Gallon was se- lected as the place for holding tho next convention. Tntti a Treltfht. Train. IKOKTO.X, 0., Sept 12. A pasaongor train on the Chesapeake A Ohio at Rus- solls, opposite Iron ton, yesterday morn- ing, crashed into tbo rear of a freight train, which for some reason yot unex- plained, was standing on the main track. Yardmastcr Brown and tho flreroan were injured, but the passengers es- caped Injury. The caboose and a car of cofleo wore wrecked. Kxponitkm Opened. Toi.Eno, Sept The Tolodo Expo- sition was opened here yesterday and the day wan observed as a holiday by the residents of the city. The exhibi- tion is tho finest over seen in North- western Ohio and is vory complete In ail its departments. A large crowd of vis- itors WM present from surrounding cities, notwithstanding the unfavorable weather. Htur the O., Sopt Informa- tioa to received from a crodiublo that Andrew Carnegio has so- cured the entire Morjfan-Drejtel inter- est ia tbe Pitlebnryb A Western rail- road. aad tbat that faction has reieasod the siaaagtiseat of the lint to hira- 0.. Sept tiooa of wtstbocad freight Xo. on PM-Daadle collidoi -t Selrca, tfcte oovatj. Thursday. Foarteea cars ditcbed aad   Toroato but. Hlv Ordoi Ont, Sept. 12. Gray, who n niaior of the Canr-'lian miluia, on Twsrlay ordorod to he takoxi down a United which was fluttering from one on-.t of the grand stand at the Industrial bition. The act was greott-d with ir.in- gled choors and hissns. Manager Hill ordered tho flag put back and on Wed- nesday "old glory was again in place. Major Gray angrily ordered tho "fiago! an alien people" to be torn from iho Hftg-stafT. This Manager Hill refused to do, saying it was only a. grncnful oom- pHmcnt to the American people, who every year visit the exhibition in largo numbers. Tho honrd of directors will pass upon tho question to-day. HAS NO KECOtJiCSE. Sunpenslon From Duty of an Who Clnliim to Uuve a Trjitii Troin Dentructton. SEWijunoH, N. Y., Sopt Robert Dunwoody, who cliims to hava flagged and saved the St. Louis nsar Now Hamburg on Nfonday nigbi% has been suspended indefinitely by iho Ccnl.ral railroad olflciala. says that his oxainir.a'ion at Albany on Tuesday was by df-teutivos Pinkorioa and by Siiporintondoiiu Bissell. Ho Indignantly denies charge made- by Humphrey that bo placed tho obstructions on the track and snys: "If this Is a effort to discredit me and ruin my reputation, I do not, see how t can provo my inno- conco." tioared by Smoky Monutalitx. APTIEVIU.E, N. C., Scot Reports received hero from reliable citizens iiv the neighborhood of Hoe Tree twelve miles east of here, state that for the third time since the Charleaioa earthquake yast volumus of smoke, run- nlng to a height ol feet, have for some days boon regularly emitted from the seven mountain peaks of the Bluu. Ridge chain. An effort is uiade to bavu Prof. C. D. Smith, the geologist Macon County, and General T. Clintrman invr.f.Ugato tho matter, many of Cho pcoplu havo bc'coir.o alarmocl that they say they will loavvS tho neighborbood. TlAnfltiKinn for flRr.E'SA, Sppt. suit for damages hecn against the Northern Pacific railroa'I by Daniel E. Bandinann, the tragedian, wiio is now in tins city. Mr. main's bagynfjc was lost in transit sonio time ago between Missoulaand Spokaii'r Falls. His billing material was ab-o lost by the same road. This suih H brought to make good looses occasiowil by bis missing several performances by reason ot tho comD'vny'.-i Sfintittlong MONTREAL, Sept. is expuctfvL that something vory sensational happen in tho case, which begins here to-day. has sworn ho will havo Hale sent pridon for shooting him, and it ;.i- advertently let out by one of fV coun- sel in the case that among th who will be called by the prosecnt'on will be ei-Prnsldent Flavor, who, It said, can give some vory ov'- dence in the case. Will Wtli Sept the evont of the Southampton strike continuing a. week longer, several steamship com- panies will cease to tcr.ke Southampton their terminus. The loss of patronage thus resulting will prevent any divi- dend being declared on the dock shares for nine years to coma Tbo shares aro already unsaleable. Shipowners aro wiring their agents io send homeward bound vessels to other ports. A Trmgfdj. i Ala., Sept day night the body of Thomas R Ik-as- ley reached here from La Grange. Tenrj. Heasley had qnarrele.l with a paintc; named W. n. Barabill, wiora be orcr the btiad with a EarsbiU waylaid Beaiiey on Monday ar.l shot him with a rifio. Oa Tuesday ley, who was a procir.en! ciiizea of La Grange, died from tbe of bia U al- imposBlMe to toll the mult of ywterday. Soaw pif- are orw WO from cotr-.- ty seats. Both parties cJai-n "eler- tkm, RepaMteans by aa4 Dsaocrato bj 1.M9. Tlitt la 
                            

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Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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