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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 9, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 9, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 213. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 9. 1890. TWO CENTS. Proposition to Increase Whisky Tax Defeated. Finance Committee's Amendment the Schedule Cott- -earred-Ia. to ELECTION IN MAINE. eaiM Carry by an Doaatv to Paid tor Protection  n the KTO'ind taut it wo-jSiJ put he o: the men who owned the ICQ gallons of spirits uon- on aid a'.so on lie srround that it would make the liquor busl- jess'an imporMnt Plcmeu: in the flaanclal sys em of the Government Mr. Oirman stud h? would vote against the H-nonrtT.ent because he 'lid not think it proper iow to put an iucrease-3 t_ix ou whisky, acd yet je be'iie-.od that un'lor the operation of the arid bill would be within two years a de Iclt in the troasurj-. He thought a deficit was asvltable, bat believed that It would be much jetter to wait a year before attempting to in- internal r-jreniie tiies. Mr. Dawes opposed the amendment because he lucre ised tux would not apply to whisky on land, which would thus be enhanced in price 'ft a gallon also because he wou'd not :.3 nit by Implication the pending bill wou d In a deficit. M- Plumb his imendment so as to make it apply to all whisky lereafter produced or withdrawn from bond. ilr Aldrich opposed the am-n Imeat because le did not think It at nil necessary. and Mr. jDckrell said he would rote against it because 16 thought the tax proposed too high. The unandment win reject-d yeas 17. nays 39. The susursectioa was then taken np, the fm- nediite "tibjcct under consideration the Hnendmeat impo--1n? duties ou all sugars ibore No. 13 Dutch Mr. Sherman ar- med ng.iinst the amendment and In faror of the iouM proposition, which, would allow all ugars below No 16, including good Qualities of irown sugar, to come in free of duty. The imendment was agreed yeas aays 13. next rote was on the Senate amendment 0 the same paragraph increasing the duty on ugars abore No 16 to sis tenlts o.' one per lent., Instead of four tenths, In the lili The amend meat was agreed yeas 29 83. Mr. Quay offered an amendment to make the luty on alt grades above No 80 eight-tenths of 1 cant per pound Rejected. The Finance Committee's amendment to iu- lode maple sugar among for which a raunty is to be paid, was f.iroreJ bv Messrs Wmundl and Blair. Mr. Carlisle declared him- opposed to all bounties The amend- ment .was agreed to -30 yeas, nays 35. Mr Manderson offered an amendment for the dmlsslon free of duty of machinery for the aanufacture of beet sugar, and for the refund ngof duties collected on such machinery sinoo anuary 1. 1890. The amendment gave rise to ft good deal of iscusaion, the two Louisiana S nators assert- og that the cane sustar and bset sugar moohln- ry were precisely the aa-ne the two Nebraska Senators asserting contrary, anil Mr. Hig 1ns and Mr. Erarts that was no ecessitj for the amendment, as the machine hops of the country were quite competent to iroflnce the machinery. Mr. Reagan compla ned of eThtb't'ons of seo- lonallsin In the bill, Illustrated in the pending mendmont and in the high duties impoied on otton ties, while binding twine wag put on the roe list; but it was useless, he said, to expect Majority oa m Ufht BUetod to Sept vote of Portland is: For Borleigh 3.570, Thompson 2.127, Clark 1M. For 3.M8, Frank 8.189. Hussey (Pro.) 77. Four Re- publican legislators are elected and one Democrat, the latter on account of local dissatisfaction. There is great enthu- siasm in the city OTer the result 6f Reed's election and a blir meeting was held in City Hall with an address by Rwsd. Forty-three of 53 towns in the First district give Reed 15.502, Prank 10.S3J, scattering 45; 4.672. The same towns in 1SSS gavi> Reed H.S73, scattering 35fi; Reed's plurality Forty-eight out of fifty-three towns Reed 10.091, j Continuation of Pension Investigation. Attorney Lemon Tells About Hto ine-8 With the Commissioner. Mr. Blair reproved Mr. Reaerm for Impuls- ions upon the Northern ptople and upon the rOTornment to which owed his life. Mr. toman said that Mr. Reagan's assertion was rue, and Mr. Blair's taunt not manly. The House spent the day discussing tie Atkinson bil> relatin to raird JUtrlct of Columbia. ctloD was had. For want of a quorum no BASE BALL. tecord of on LeaRno, Association and Brotherhoo.l Flnldn. Following are the scores of Monday's XATIOXAL LEAGUE. At Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 7. At No rain. At New York 6, New York 9 -eleven darknosa. At UrooKlyn 3. Phila- elphia 4 AMERICAN At Toledo 5, Athletics At St. Louis 8, Rochester At Louisville 1, Baltimore h PI.ATEJIS1 LEiOUE. At Cleveland 4, Pitts- rargh 6. At Chicago 9, Buffalo 5. At New York 6, Boston 18. At Philadelphia 5, Brook- nrakemen on a Strike. 0., Sept 9 morn- ng; the brakemen on the outgoing roight trains on the Toledo, Columbus k Cincinnati road strnclt for an advance n wages from 81.75 to per day. As ast as trains arrived in the city the irakemen left them and joined the trtkers. They attempted to prevent rains going out manned with new rat the police interfered. Later in the the men were paid off and dis- narged. No further trouble is appre- lended. CollUlon. EOCHZSTER, N. Y., Sept A col- ision between passenger trains Nos. 19 'Ud20 occurred near Lockport early morning on the Central rail- in which baggageman Fiddler was uled and engineer Bradley and flre- aaa Houston were badly hurt, Brafl- -7 s legs being broken. Stf passonirers fe-ehnrt The accident Is ft ttnbu led o a semaphore Hffht going oat To Organic Uiw. PaAjKFORrj Ky 9 _A 'on to revise and amend the oonstila- of Kentucky convened in this olty It is composed oC ateg and embraces the tnost distin- men in the State, among present Governor, aa ex-Gov- and er-Chief Justice, aad Kveral mention is the result of repmtod on the part of fee pooplo to the conatrtatiw Frank 11.880; Reod'a plurality 4.753, ag-ainst 2.4S9 in The remaining towns are small and will not materially chanpe these figures. One hundred and ninety-six towns ffive Burlcigrh Thompson scatreriujr Burlcigh's plurality The same in ISsS Burloiprh 48.443, Patnam 3S.64S. scatter- ing 2.770; Uarleiifh's plurality 12.79.-5. T'.'.-o hundred and ten towns pive Bur- leigh Thompson Clark 861, scattering 85S. The same towns in 1SS3 gave a Republican vote of "SO.S51. Dem- ocratic Prohibition 1.276, scatter- ing Republican plurality against Republican gain 501. If the towns to hoar from fall off in the same proportion the flnal vife should stand- Republican about (54.000. Demo- cratic scattering total 000. One hundred and thirty towns give Burleiffh Clark 496, scattering 544. The last time B'ir- leigh had Putnam Cusih- ing 90 scattering 699. RPpublican plu- rality S.W7, as against 9.254 two years ago, a Democratic of 257. One hundred and fifty frivc Bur- leigh Thompson Clark 60S, scattering 009 Last time Burleiffh had Pui-iarn 2S.37J. Cushin? scattering S44. Republican plurality 799, against 9.S20 two years ago, a Dem- ocratic gain of 21. In 1SS6, tho off the vote Republican Democratic Prohibition scattering 23; Repub- lican plurality This year the plurality will be about 19.000. a gain of and ahead of tho Presidential year. The merabprsof Congress are re- elected by largo majorities, M Reed's being.doubled.- The county officers are mostly Republican. The Senators are pro'oably all Republicans, as in the last Legislature, and the Representatives must stand full as strongly Republican, namely: 125 Republicans to 26 Demo- crats. AUOUSTA, Me., Sept Chairman Manley. of the Republican State Com- mittee, has seat tbe following dispatch to President Harrison: "Maine craves the largest Republican majority in an off year since 1SQO, and a larger majority than (riven in a Presidential contest since 186S, with the single exceptions of 1884 and 1SSS. Governor is re- elected by a majority exceeding Speaker Reed is re-elected by the larg- est majority he ever received, exceed- ing Representatives Boutello and Millikon are re-elected by majorities ranging1 from to TRAIN WRECKING SUSPECTS Two More nt Albany, N. tectives and Police Very Busy. ALBANY, N. Y., Sept the alleged train wrecker arrested at Hud- son, is still kept in close confinement at tho Central railroad in this city. Nobody is allowed to talk to him, and his family are not even permitted to see him. Superintendent Bissoll and De- tective Pinkerton refuse to answer any questions, but hint to reporters of com- ing sensational developments. The gen- eral impression is that Reed is held for information and is voluntarily a prison- er. The reason for not jailing him is said to be fear of a suit for false Im- prisonment The defectives aro all busy and tho Albany police is in use besides. As a result of the information fur- nished by Reed, detectives Pinkorton, Humphreys, Devine and to- gether with the local force, ran "down two men yesterday. The men are John Cordial, twenty-four years of age, a con- ductor, and John Kearnan, thirty-six years of ago, a "brakeman. 'Both are Knights of Latxv and 'strikers. They were arrested on warrants sworn out at the instance .of the New York Central The Charge of KaTortttna In Claims Shown to Without MOB. WASHIN-OTOX, Sept apecia.' House conjmittoo investigating tin charges against Commissioner of Pen- sions R.iura continued :he investigation yesterday. Mr. Lemon was the first I witness. He read a statement covering the points of the case which referred to I hitnsel! aad his business. He presented a scatcmont showing the claims allowed him by tho Pension seven oor- responding months under Commission- ers Black and Kaum. Tho former had allowed him aad the latter O.OS9. Ho s.-xid that the that he had been favored by thp decision of Commis- sioner Raum, any more than other at- torneys was an unqualified falsehood and that it was an impossibility for any commissioner to do this. The charge, he saii, could only be made through ig- norance and malice. Mr. charged that out of cases afiecto 1 by tho decision of Com- missioner Raum were his, and that he had received foes on these claims amounting to This statement, he said, was grossly inac- curate. He had never asked Mr. Raum or any other commissioner him, and in making the charge Mr. Cooper had displayed ignorance and malice. He invited Mr. Cooper to coma to his office and examine all the cases on file, hit clerks and his method of doing bugii ness and him to do this and not go and Mr. Cooper him what was'th< amount of his fortuno, and what his an- nual incoma rrorn tae pension business amounted to He refused to answer questions, saying that it was none oi Mr Cooper's business. The committee upheld him in this refusal. i In answer to questions by Mr. Cooper! Mr. Lemon said that he had suggested) the luhug- complained of to Commlsf stonor Raura, and had seon him at differ ent times and suggested the matter. Hi thought that the ruling was just. denied, however, that it benefited any more than it did others. In to questions in reference to hU iudora ing the notes for Mr. Raum, he told thd committee how and when it happened Mr. Cooper him if he did think it was improper to indorse the notes undor tho circumstances of the lations he bore Mr. Raum. He replied that he did not and it he had he should not have done so. In answer to a question by Mr. Lewis, he said that he hold shares of stock in Mr. Raum's company as securi- ty. The security was offered by Mr. Raum himself and not asked for by him and ho would have indorsed the papers on Mr. Raum's high character alone. He said that he never had any assur- ance from Mr. Raum or any one else that ho would issue tho order he had been urging before he indorsed the note, and it merely happened that he indorsed tbe note the day aftor tho order was issued and it had no connection what- ever with tho ruling. In answer to a question by Mr. Sawyer, as to how many of the casos put into the com- pleted files wore his, ho said he did not know, but did not think there were more than Attempt to Wreck Passenger Train. Time It Was nt Old Troy, N. Y., on the Central Bcwd. Who Warned tho at by (Tnknowa Who Bccaped la tho ALBAXY, N. Y.. Sept six o'clock train out of New York, due here at last was thirty minutes late, and as this train is usually on time it looked suspicious. A blockade in- tended to wreck the train was discov- ered by a track walker at Now Ham- burg and tho train was just in time to prevent a serious accident. At a point called Old Troy, near Ham- burg, the train was Stopped so quickly that the passengers were thrown from their seats. There was great excite- ment, the people on the train believing that there was another accident. The cause, however, was tho appearance of a trackman with a rod Inntorn and with blood streaming from a wound in his shoulder. The said ho several shota fired and then saw the man. the trackman could spoak he said that there was an obstruction on the track, and a searching party soon found a pile of ties laid across and braced.from behind with pieces of rail- road iron. The obstruction removed and the train proceeded with a thorough- ly frightened lot of passengers. Two men out rowing on tho river near that point saw somt. men busy on the tracks, and waiting until they disap- peared they crawled quietly up. They found a steel rail wedged in the cattle- guard in the same way as at Albany, and braced up in the same way by pieces of iron. With all their strength they, could not move it and started down the track to warn the Chicago limited ex- press. They met a trackman and swinging his red lantern, started to stop the train. 'In an instant several shots rang out and ono took effect in the trackman's shoulder. However, tho train -was stopped about 100 yards south of the obstruction. An official report just received shows that the obstruction was not placed like the ono at Albany. There is a culvert at this point and into that culvert wore jammed seven heavy ties. Those ties wore placed so that their-butts pointed towards the apnrosr.htiR train, the engine had struck it tho ties'would only have been driven In harder and the train would havo gone into the river. HE WAS OSTRACIZED. of an Cx-rnloa Soldier Indirectly by the CoaJM- NORFOLK. Va., donth of R. P. Wheeler on Saturday night wms indirectly to resolution of- fttred by him at the Grand Army vention at Petersburg last spring reflect- ing on the Confederate flag. Up to that time he was doing a good business and was very popular with the peoplo of Norfolk. The resolution offered was in the shape of a petition to Congress to the manufacture of the Confederate flag, which Wheeler termed a "ooa- temptible rag." His action aroused the people here and affected Wheeler's business to such an extent that after some weeks he publicly denied being ro- aponsible lor the resolution. IIo oven went so far as to appear at tbo head of a detacLraont of Grand Army men at the time of a Confederate celebration. It was subsequently proven, however, that he was tho author of tho resolution, and then the fooling against him be- came His business contin- ued to go and ho sought relief in drink. To an ovor indulsonco is at- tributed bis doAth. Wheeler was an ox- Onion soldier. Stcry of ftoccnt Events hi Othet Ohio Cities. PAN'IC AT A FUNKRAL. SPLIT ASUNDER. Interest lu Athl-tlc Reviving. BAi.TTMoiin, Sept What will prob- ably prove to be a successful effort is now being made to form here an organ- ization similar to those now existing in several cities and which as a body are known as tho National Amateur Ath- letic Union, In tho ovent of the suc- cess of the scheme the Baltimore asso- ciation will apply for admission. Should all the olubs mentioned as possible members of tho union ontor it, tbe as- sociation would begin with a member- ship of 000 700. The Burge W. E. Tremble Sank la Col- of Crew Drowned. PORT HUROX, Mich., Sept. barge W. E. Tremble, tn tow of tbel steamer Blanchard. was run into by the' steam barge W. JU Wetruore in the1 rapids opposite Fort Gratiot at an early! hour Monday morning and sunk in! thirty-five feet of water. The Tremble! was split open and went to the bottom! in two minutes. All the crew escaped! except a young man named William M.J McMaw, who was drownpd. The Trem- ble is owned by J. C. Pitzpatrlck, of Cleveland. She lies about 300 yards from the American shore and is directly in the way of vessels passing the rapids. The bow of the Wetrnore was badly damaged and she was drydocked for ro- pairs. At a later hour tho R. P. Ran- ney, in trying to avoid the wreck of tho Tremble, ran into tho transfer steamer Huron and was to the extort of RUINED DY PIKE. Floor of a Church Given Way, Throwing Into the Cellar and Tipping the Co (tin. BALIIMOUK. Sopt sensation in tho 1'ikes ville Baptist church was caused Sunday by a section of the floor giving way while the funeral of Mrs. Surah E. Dorsoy was in progress. A daughter of the deud woman, tho undertaker and two pall-bcarors weio precipitated into the cellar. The pall-bearers prevented the cothn from going entirely down, although it was lipped almost on end. Many persons, thinking that the entire church about to fall down, rushed for tho doors. The clergyman managed to quiet the crowd, after which the coffin and those in the cellar were extricated from the timbers. Mr. Wagner was badly bruised and his shoulder was dis- located. Tho others were not much hurt Aftor quiet had boon restored the casket was again brought In and the services wore gone through with Congressmen Ktivr Removal of Grant's LAGONDA SCHOOL FIGHT. Ttto Troable a Criatlaal a, Sept The Bal- lentine school matter has assumed a most sensational phase. Mr. Bailontine Was assigned aa principal of the Lagon- schools by the unanimous vote of the school board of this city August 18 last Two weeks ajro, at the regular meeting of tbe school board, a petition sijjnfd by over 250 heads of families at was presented to the .board. Ballon t me has had .Dr. J. W. Nelson, who makes serious charjros against him, arrested for criminal libel. Dr. Nelson stoutly maintains that hecin Drove his The citizonb of L.iyonda took their daughters from the school and to sonil thf'm while Ballonti'io is principal. Prominent Citir.nu AMU-AIII'LA, 0., Scot Robert C. WarmiugLou died Sunday ovuiiiucr f't'in a stroke of paralysis and aftor an illnoss of short duration, njjvd so-.enty ye MS. Tho deceased was of tlie nionoer residents of this city a hiirV.y ro- spected citizen. Ilo Icavus two uhilsiron, Mrs. Amelia Caugboy, of Eric, atidMji. E. F. Stoll, of the Stoll House, this city. The funonil services will bo hold this afternoon, the buntil boing conducted by the Masons and G. A. R., of which orders tbo deceased was a member in high standing. Mike It road and the charge Is train wrecking. Frime fight Betwoen Women. NKWARK, N. J., Sept Her- bert and Mabel Brown, daughters of prominent residents of Pleasaatville, N. J., fought a prize fight in a sixteen-foot ring pitched in an old barn on the out- skirts of that Sunday. The cause of the fight was rivalry for the at- tentions of a young man named Goorge Woodward. Thirty-eight rounds were fought in which both girls were severe- ly punished, but had the advan- tage and the contest was declared a draw. Tbe referee, seconds and specta- tors were all females. Captured. NJTW YORK, Sept easterns officials made a seizure of diamond jew- elry yesterday from W. H. Medharsfc, a young Englishman. The diamonds ag- gregate nearly in value. Med- hurst arrived here on the steamer Tow- er Hill, from London. Be brought with him a number of horses which proposes using in traveling through tbe country. He feels sore over (he capture of his diamonds and he says as be to possessed of CMO.OOO he will buy the jewelry la what it is put up at Ball Plnycri 9no Pnn.AOJnc.pJnA1, Sept ward, Rob- inson and of base bair club. "yesterday irrttttbted legal proceedings'- atfairist the laftitogement, looking to the recovery of salaries for the month of August It is'-'iald that none of the'playera have received any salary for tbe month erf August and that the club isbeaind to some 'of 'them on account of June "salaries. The other players will probably firing adit later in the week. I1L, aept 9. The Springfield Exposition opened yester- day with a very largo' attendance. All the departments are crowded to the ut- most with attractive exhibits from Illi- nois and adjoining States, and tbe pro- gramme for tho week includes not only exciting speed contests and Roman chariot races every day, bwt other inter- esting special Cardinal Xmaatmg tbe Sept Cardinal Manning has written a letter the social science congress now held at glum, urging the necessity for hours as a working day for miners- tbat no women be employed la tbat Sunday obMrrtttoe be Lightning Strikes the O.Tlcoa of the Penn- KaUroul at Altonna, Do- Greit ALTOONA, Pa., Sept. struck the offices of the Pennsylvania Railroad at noon Monday and in a few minutes the building was ablate. The building was badly gutted before the fire could be extinguished. Great damage was also done by water and It is foa-cd valuable records and memoranda are ruined. Tho loss, which can not be estimated at present, will be heavy. There was great excitement for a time among the hundreds of clerks employed in tho building, but all es- caped, though there wore several nar- row escapes from suffocation. All rail- road business is temporarily suspended. The lightning entered tho telegraph room, in which are stored tons of paper, and the fire gained great headway. nu Second Murder. PITTSBUBOB, Sept quarrel- ing over the Stone-Shiras contest in the Twenty-third Congressional 'district last night, John Thompson stabbed James Ford six times in the back and once in the log. Ford will die. He was em- ployed an barkeeper at Jones Stan- ford's saloon, Allegheny, where tbe flght occurred. A warrant is out for Thomp- son's arrest for violating the election laws at the primaries on Saturday last. About three years ago Thompson shot and killed Jimmy Weeden, a noted prize fighter. Thompson was arrested. Gtmm PrrrsTJCsen, Sept, MO isbing boys at T. O. less Glass Company and Atterborj Co.'s chimney factories OB tbe South Stde struck for M tnnciitD of pay of fire cento a HUB. strike ODD far twj of Uw be m- Collided In a WHEELING, W. Va., freight wreck occurred at Board tree tunnel, on the Baltimore A Ohio railroad, early Monday morning. Two fast freights collided at the entrance of the tonne! and both engines ten were Engineers Charles Luthke and Dominlck Kelly, together with both firemen, were badly Injured. _ Sept. tivo O'Noill. of Pennsylvania, Unit in a canvass of the House made by him, he found that but little more than one- tenth of opposed to the Senate rcuolution for tho removal of the remains of General Grant from New York to Arlington. Of tho thirty- six members who are opposed to the resolution, only throe aru from States other than New York. Mr. O'Noill says that next Monday be will move to suspend the rulou and pass tho resolu- tion. Murdered nil Adopted Hlfter. LOCKPOUT, N. Y Sept Ran- somvllle, sixteen miles northeast of this place, a boy named Charles Orambo, aged fourteen years, murdered his adopted sister, Rose, eight years of ago. The children's parents wore away at the time. Young Grambo Is said to have leaded a shotgun with sand and' gravel and discharged it at the little girl's head, lie then carried her in a wagon to the residence of Dr. Long, who found that the pebbles had penetrated the girl's brain and that her injuries wore fatal. _______________ Horn Blown to Atoms. SILVER CtTT, N. M., Sept. boys were blow to atoms at Pinos Altos last Saturday night under very sus- picious circumstances They were the sons of John A. Murray. Murray and his wife parted several years ago. The eldest boy was crippled by the cars at Dcming six yearscago, recovering dam- ages from the railroad company. Tho money received from the railway com- pany was held in trust for the crippled boy. Murray has been arrested on sus- picion of having killed his children that he might get possession of the trust fund. Short Corn Crop In TOPKKA, Kan., 8opt. corn the monthly crop report makes a very discouraging sho wing. It says of tbe area planted to corn last spring our correspondents report 56.4 worth har- vesting, and tho avo rage yield per aero worth harvesting is reported at sixteen bushels. According to this estimate the corn prod uco of Kansas this year will be about bushels, less than one-fourth of last year's crop. Wheat is reported aa yielding better than was expected and the quality U excellent_______________ They Would Retaliate. New YORK, Sopt 9. A Jl alifax spe- cial says that in discussing tho McKin- ley tariff bill in connection with its ef- fect on Jamaica, tho Kingston Standard says: "If the Americans persist in im- posing a heavy duty on Jamaica sugar we have it in oar power to retaliate by raising our im port duties on American products. The food stuffs we now get from tbe United States we can obtain as cheaply and as conveniently from Canada Sept Tho will of Laura Kerr Axtoll, who died at Painos- ville on July 18, was probs'tod in Ln-kc County August 15. Tbo estate loft wus a large ono and was divided among a large number of relatives and A copy was sent totheCuyahoga County probate ctvirt Monday for record, ns a number of tbo legatees reside in Cleve- land. Two of tho most important be- quests in tho will are gift of to tho Case School of Applied Si-.ionoe, and to tho Trinity tlorao for Friendless. _ Agaluit a Freuc'ior. Mn.LEJisivuno, Sopt 9. commit too, appointed by the pre-bytory of thn U. P. Church, has been hero taking, taati- in tbe matter of tho of drunkenness made against. Rev. John Oailoy, which was mado in Now Lisbon some weeks ago. Tho objoct of tho com- mittee's visit here was to look into sim- ilar by a membnr of hW own church, and as having occurred here. Tho committee visited New Lisbon and took testimony, tho nature of which at not known. Convict by Oat. Cor.uMntTS, Sopt Henry Morsrann, a convict sentenced to impmonrannt for life, committed suicide Sunday night by inhaling gas from a jot in his cell. In his mouth was found a tube mado from letters he had recoivod. Tbcw ho hid attached to a gas jet in hh coll. after tying a hnndkoicbief around fie gas tube to prevent tho gas escaping, he lay on his bed and inhaled it until dead. Mersmon was sent up far Ben Ricking in Cincinnati, about years ago. _ of 1'rotnlsu ?ettlo-L Sopt. Tho colnbrafod breach of promise suit brought by Miss Anna Dusek against Dr. F. W: Daykin has been settled, tbo doctor paying the woman SSOQ and also discharging all costs of tho suit The case was bogun about fifteen months ago, and some vory sensational charges wero made by tho plaintill against tho dofondant. Call for a Convention. LIMA, 0., Sept. A call has Issued for tho Republican Congrpsafon.vl convention of tho Fifth district to he held in this city September 2'3. Th? can- didates spoken of arc lion. Horace A Reeves, of Delphos; General Bliss and Hon. James L. Price, of Lima. Colonel Fred Layton, of Wapalconota. is the Democratic nominee. Brown County Solid for RIPLET, 0., Sept re- tnrns received from tho various town- ships throughout tbe county as to tha result of the Democratic Congressional primary show that Hon. C. A. White has received ft majority of tho popular vote, and consequently will havo tho Krtld delegation of Brown Connty In the new convention. Aa OU Suicide. 0., Sopt Gil- bert, aged twenty-two, an oil pumper, suicided Monday rooming by taking thirty-two morphine pills Uo formerly resided In New York, and was the son of wealthy parents. Brooding over loss of money was the Cfl-usa of his sulcldo. Sept. schooner arrived yesterday with auroral OMM Of vnall-por aboard. OM of tailor. farad w to few To Elect gnccewoor. LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Sept Gov- ernor Eagle will issue a proclamation to-day calling a special election in the Second Arkansas Congressional district to fill the vacancy caused by the ousting of Major C. Bracken ridge by the house. The date of tbe special election will be November 4, time fixed for tbe regular election in all tbe Con- gressional Hanter'f Hand Shot Oft 0-, Sept out ing Monday morning .Tames Ackolson, prominent citizen of Minerva, had his left hand torn completely off at tbe wrist by a premature discharge of his gun as he wae reloading. Meeaax 
                            

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