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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - September 6, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SAX.EM DAILY NEW VOL. IL NO. 211. SALEM. OHIO, SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6. 1890. TWO CENTS. CEil OF A Express en the New Central Wrecked. HE OKDRKS. A Bail Placed Across the Track Re- sults in the Demolition oi Six Coachea. Iujureilt but None to- From Ap- palling; Di'.nster Large Loss to the Company. ALBANY, N. Y.. The second of train No. tho Adirondack and Montreal frcr.i N-'w York, j on the New York O-tr'il nilroad. was wrecked about three miles below Green- bnsh, about en'.' o'clock yesterday morn- ing. Six sleepers were wrecked, but. miraculous it may seem, no one was killed. Seven persons injured. A single rail pla-.-e-d cros.s-.vise on the track in front of the train resulted in the dis- i aster. Six ejac" .vere b.itto sido up on o: a embankment and three were and wrenched beyond rop-.ir. Of rho eight sleer.ors comprising the train but j ttvo wt'rr- left or. the tra--k. The others were either on the embankment or ly- ing across the rails. i Atnonz the sixty passengers were a j number of New Yorkersnnd nearly half of them were women. Nearly all were asleep in their berths and knew nothing until they felt themselves clashed from their bunks and opened their eyes to find them-selves lying across other pas- sengers. Improvised bunk-- in tho re- lief train were made for the injured by three Albany physicians and their wants were administered to. Fortunately none of the cars took fire, or the loss of life would have been groat. Most of the passengers got oif at Albany and re- mained at the hotels for a while to col- lect their scattered senses. All were able to proceed on their journey except a Mrs. Atkinson, who was taken to tbo city hospital. Superintendent Bissoll will institute a ria-orov.s investigation to ascertain, if possible, who placed tho obstruction on tho tr.ick. The destruc- tion of the train must have been de- cided upon in a hurry, for the wrecked train was but twenty-Sve minutes be- hind the first section and that came through all right. The loss in money to the company will foot up into tho thousands. The statement of the engineer is to the effect that he was running at high speed, as he was late. The first indica- tion ho had of an obstruction on the track was the cotiplote turning over of his engine with a crush, n or awhile he was stunned, but he soon re- coTore'd and be and tho fireman started back toward the express due in twelve minutes. Tasy succeeded in signaling it and then returned to their own train. The front of tho engine and the small trucks were badly smashed. Not only was the obstruction placed on the up- tfack, but the down-track was also blocked. Another attempt was made to wreck a passenger train Friday morning. The train from the west, duo horo at a. m., came slowly down through the gap u-est of West Albany when the engineer saw an obstruction on the track. The train was and it was found that ties had been thro-, n on tho tracks by some Thfy were removed and the train to city. Superintendent h.is received a dispatch from Vice 1'resident Webb toll- ing him to oilf r a reward of 35.000 for tbo detection of tbo person or persons who placed the rail on the track, caus- ing the accident. Arbitration Commis- sioner Donovan say- iii.it i'uf obstruc- tion was in a most diabolic-ally aiethodic.il manner. T.'io two sections of steel rail were up between tbo rails and the in such a manner that the engine would ride upon them and be wrecked. Tne rails were propped up by pieces of railroad iron. Alleged that the Failure of -awyer. Wal- lace Co. Rttultrd from the Stubborn Foolish Conduct of I.on-ion Agent. NEW YORK, Sept. 3. Th? H-'rsld pub- lishes a storv to the effect tha: the fail- ure of Sawyer, Wallace jfc Co. was un- doubtedly due to the treachery of L. W. Sawyer, the London agent of the firm. This gentleman is represented to have had a fascination for much so that the firm bad from time to time remonstrated with him. In in attempt to corner tho pork market a year ago Sawyer :s said to have utterly disregarded the New York house and to enor- mous orders to the Chi- tive of the firm. Heavy j.-dfrs drawn on the New York hoi.se i'-. of maturing contracts startled the firm into realizing that, through thf'.r ngent, they owned the entire visible supply of pork in the country at such figures made it impossible to unload at other than a severe loss. Mr. Sawyer disregarded orders to Stop his tran--3.: lions buy- ing pork tbrousrh I.or.c.on wh'le it was being disposed of in No-.v York at a loss. af-pp'ptir.g '..o rec-ivc-r themselves, Sawy.ir, Wallace oi Co. lost every thing. In regard to suicide of the Berlin agent, the Herald's narra- tive savs that it is almost a certainty that tho man had sen; a number of false contracts for grain to thf London house and bad embezzled the amount of guar- antee on a number of gonuine ones. AST UNHAPPY LAND. And Tliat Was Reason Enough for Their Discharge. Close of -the Investigation to tho Cannes for the Strik? on tha Sew York Central Road. -u of Faithful Service Counted for Wai-i; !t w.u Man was a Member of a Labor Organi- zation. N. Y.. Sept. The Stato Kor-.M  resents a strikingly martial appear- ance The road from S.inta Ann to futiapa shows the ravacres of tbo con- flict. The Guatemalan frontier army is rapidly moving, but to what quarter is not known, though it is said that revolu- ions are expected in some of the eastern departments and the .troops had been sent there. Tho recuperation in Guatemala is slower than in Salvador and in many places the crops are a complete loss, owing to inattention. The inhabitants seem restless ar.d cautiously condemn ;he Barillos government Thuy conaUor ,hat the war was brought about by a spirit of conquest -Bud they alone have jeen the sufferers. Can Vot tin Into CHICAOO, Sept. 0. Senator Chapman, a member of the conference on World's Fair matters during tbo special se-aion of the Legislature, says the proposal of the Illinois Central rail- road to relinquish its prosont right of way and take another one further out in what is now the lake, car. nut be car- ried into effect. He points out this section in the act of tho Legislature: "If any part of tho submerbed lands which are to be reclaimed or Sllod shall bo diverted to any other than that of a public park, all such hind or lands shall revert to tho State of Illinois." Engineer and Firprrmn Killed. rxxTox. Tex., Sept fi. The south- bound freight train on tho Mi.-sou.-i, Kansas Texas was ditctr-a at Chouo- tah, Indian Territory. after- noon, and engineer Doiid an.) frf-pian Ebbeson killed. The enirinoer was buried under the debris of sixteen cars. After the wro'-k the train look fire and was destroyed. The dead engineer re- sided in this city and a. largr-> family. He was a prominent of the Brotherhood of Locomotive En- gineers. _ Ilrnt.a? Commander Sept Uoc-ller. who com- manded the Bavarian infantry regiment which was to ir.arch -it rial speed from tri Mariclebri.it ui.fior a fCorcLiag sun maneuvers. has been dismissed from the service. Of the oSO men who fell by tho way from fatigue, many will nr-ver their health. Three died and six committed suicide by throwing themselves into r -sidont and that Mr. L-i'vvru w.i-i for lack of at- tention to du'.v. H..- did not know that as dis-.i'.: .1 for being a Knight of Labor. Mr. Pryor asked for as to inflect of duty. a.-iil .-.--.'u tli.: L f.'vre was by ,rln! w.; u'S-0 neglecting his kr. >w that tho mnn d.s-.h.irgi-l was a Knight of Labor, but did not pay any attention to his standing. Ho that ho thought Lufpvre was .ictivo in tho kr.ights. Mr. a discharged em- ploye, said he beer, in tho employ wi iLj for eighteen years. LUs- sell discharged him. but gave no rea- sons. telling him ho know what for. IIo supposed it was for being a knight. lie had never been reprimanded. Alfred Dubois. a discharged employe, had been eight yea r.i in the service of tho road. He was a knight. The reasou for his discharge was given as being a labor agitator, lie had never been repri- manded. AVLlli'im V.'arnnr, nine years an em- ploye: Noal Costigan. an employe five years; Silas Foster, twenty-seven years; John Micklohivu, fifteen years; George Hoffman, twentj'-two years; George Mudin, twenty years, and maimed by accident, and others, all discharged men and Knights of Labor, gave ovidenco that they were discharged without cause, except in three cases whore tho men had scrv-das a committee from tho knights asking for reinstatement of a, by Mr. Packard. Mr. Packard, superintendent of tho Wost Albany shops, testified that he had discharged some men for lack of work and others by reason of orders from Superintendent Buchanan. He never discharged a man or to discharge any for appearing as com- mittees. John McCa-thy, called for tho strik- ers, said he was employed for twenty- three years and had beeji a Knight of Lai.'or for five months. No reason was given for bis discharge. Edward F. Reillv, master workman oi a local as- sembly of knights, gave similar testi- mony. CoDimi.ssioner Purcell asked for tho production of the agreement between the road and tho men and it was put in evidence. The investigation was then closed. Mr. Purcoll said bo wished it understood that tho law allowed tho board to giro an opinion or decision only when both parties consented to arbi- trate.. In this case the board would con- si'lor the tosttriony and would m ike certain ri-commondations for the amica- ble serl.viiynt of the difficulty. Tho boar.1, no: make this announcement, howY. r. through the Legislature, an-1 so January 1 will pr.jbr.bly be the datn their views will become pub- lic- insane by their suffering. r.virg beor. rcr.di rod Wanatnakcr Will Go of tho Carpet Trade. PHILADELPHIA. Sept. 6. formal transfer of the wholesale carpet busi- ness of John at No. 1120 Market street, which Uoyd. Ilarley Co- have about purchased, will not. be made until about December l, when the litter firtn will take charge of tho establishment By the terms of the sale Mr. Wanamaker to rf-tiro altogether from the wholesale carpet trade and only a re tail business. Guilty of Criminal Sept. ij. Judgo Humphrey, of the District Court of East Norfolk, has mad" return on the in- quest held on the recent Ol-J railroad disaster at Quin-y. He finds that the track jack the of tho accident, that Joseph Welsh, tbo section siastor, fr.il ty o: aegiirocce in placed on t.be track at tr.a? tirr.e. P.cnmrrtl Krenin Will Rnslpn. NKW Yn.'iK. Sept. 0. -A Washington special "ays- A report, apparently w< 11 founded, i-; current that recent develop- ments in the Pension Office scandal make it probable that Commissioner Ruum's resignation -.vill soon be in the bands of tho President. If Mr. Rauin does not resign removal is thought to b'1 Th'- of this not altogether unexpected turn of affairs is tho discovery that Raum, in addition to bis Universal refrigerator enterprise, has been engagod in real estate transac- tions that will not inspection. I-i, Nr-t- gas ha.s boea foan-i one of Brook'.yn. this county. Tho is sank to of fSve or six fee Tonrpoo tVlll On .fall. N Y., Snpt. S-.i- prome Coiirt yestorday. Judge Lewis af- firmed the ordor for tho imprison-.r.ent of Emma K. Tourgeo for c.-itcm-.t.   Telegraph publishes an article to th< effect that a powerful alliance now ex- ists among sonic of the richest corpora- tions of tho country, the object of which is protection against strikes. The in- stitutions in the alliance employ about workers, and therefore directly support at least a quarter of a million of people. Among the corporations which are members of the alliance are the West- inghouso interests in tlm city a-'d else- where; tho Yale Lock ConiVaiu-. r.d- Arms Company and four or oi'io: like extensive Xov and elsewhere. Tho compact agroud tc is that in case a strike occurs to enforce unreasonable demands, whether tho strike bn against ono or all of tho asso- ciated factories, nil work is to cr-aso. The strikers are to bo allowiul to re- main idle until they return to work vol- untarily, and no factory is to employ any worker who may have left, another .u-.tory on a strike. N'oit.hrr i< any as- sociated factory to seek workers during astriko from any of thu fodernU'd worKS. Story of iiiul Slinck- I'rnt-t iccil I'pon Klllen. SAX Sept. t'.. Captain John Thomas, of th barkentino Cath- erine which has arrived at 1'ort Townsend from Sihoria. has sent to this city a description of tho Uussian exile system as witnessed by Ho states that a largo party of u silos of all ages, heavily manacled, wen- l..-iug taken to Ltighallon Island. A feu- old men whoso strength gave out foil from exhaustion. Thu brutal driver, acting under orders from his superior, shot the unfortunate men and removed their chains. No morcy or discrimination was Shown. Wives saw their husbands killed and mothers saw their daughters outraged. The exiles woro driven like cattle, a heavy whip being used to urge them on. The prison cells are filthy and the treatment barbarous. IN PKKfL. Xnrron- of front JvtlTocn- tinii ut the Itottom of Shiift. Scii.v.VToN. I'a., Sept. Tho lives of 300 mon and boys, working in tho Cay- uga mi no. wore in deadly peril afternoon through rho burning of tho engine house, and for a time an excite- ment reaching pandemonium existed about the mouth of the mine, whuro a great crowd of men. women and chil- dren gathered. The (Ire stopped tho fans, shutting all the currents, and suffocation of the mon seotm-d probaldo. Experienced miners, however, noticing the stoppage of tii'i air, at one" something was wrong at i.lie mouth of the shaft and they tied to tho workings of the Brisbin mine, out of which they all escaped unharmed. BKCCKKNttlLHiK SKATED. Krtcl of n Klcctlou Content In of Tariff mil. WASHINGTON. Sept. HPIISB -In the ITnnso yesterdny C'liiyton-nrucupni-iilije flt-.-tlnn CIVHC was tukin 1111 nnd Mr tirijclt'jiirlrtite mnde a long lipcoch In b'.s ou-ii tiuhiiU. Mr Uulznll. of Pennsylvania tho ilehu'r fur :lio cntn- mltteo. anrt u'tcr a motion to r.iurnU liail defeated nncl Ibc minority report reji'ctC'I Uin Committee rcii.irt ISn-clienri'lgc) Tlr- f'vun'iitf of tn .-'iniiil- nition of wits 10' the House wns- .li'viitiM private pniision hills SESATI: -In Hi.- Si'ii tariff bill iin.U'r th. tlnucil. Tlic frui; 1.-.1 D.ivts' arnonilin-Til 'He conslil-nt'oij of the (Ivn .Titnntc ruli- iv g cnn 'mil Mr t-i Mli-.g n Vt !M Mir.-t n'Htnrccl to the (luiiable list Tin. of tlie free list was conchnli-il hi-forc lulioiir'iinenU A Kli-rrn R.ot. yjOiTfivii.i.ic, (i. Workmen omplovod by .v .IcITnrson- villo Bridge Company in laying twits. supposed to bo for ih" thf- Ilig Four railroad, over right of way owned by the bridge v. in this c.ity last night, wt-rf; a uf work- men eir.ployr-d .M the Dennis Loog pipo works, who lielifjvcd bo laid acro-is Long's properly A dr.-s- porate fight endued and a uurnhct of the participant1! were injured, one of them, John fatally hurt. A largo force of police finally qurdU'd tho riot, and tho track laying was resumed. Soiitohorly I'ny BAI.TIMOHE, Sept.. 0. Having awn-v-d the decision of thf: States Sunnr- vising Inspector in th'i collision casn, in which lives wore lost in July last, the attor- neys employed by relatives of tho do- ceased have entered suits against the Bay Lino and tho Colchester steamboat companies, thn damages ajrjfrng- tingup wards of SW.VI.OOO. Both companSe-i aro made parties fondant and it will be for tho court to hereafter determine which VMSC! was in fault. fHtior suits are oxp'-'ii'.-d to follow. He TJirrw the Mntr.h Away. KEW HAVES. Conn.. Sept. r.. Vir-tor Mufhlich. vrbo was arrested Thursriay night on suspicion of starting the f.m tho New Flavf-n wiro works, acknowl- edged in the city court ysto.-d.-iy that ho went into tho building, '.it a and tbruw '.be match away Ho was parti.'iuy a- tiiao. ho found tho :n fiaaies ho out and bold in 53.000. HfTr-rt of Klf ruilaro. yr.-x TV- fail-re of lawyer, .v, oa wheat marir'-t by a drop in r.ilur'- bst A dis- froT.. a rr.'.ro .vri- ons eflcci iV- lucre. rr.achJr boiler 5" shops wrc cofl- f, fin-i ao- itoss :i.at the PIED OP IN da Mirror of Happenings Our lioumiiiries. per bour as SCHOOL DESERTED. Farents of at Springfield Chlldr.-n Away from Notorious Si'Hixonni.n, O., Sept. of pupils in iho Lagonda school have mado a kick against principal R C. Ttallcvj- tine, objecting to having thoir daugh- ters nnder instruction. afternoon thoy took thoir c'litdrnr. oii of and will submit the r 'o tho board. Two a.'o was discharged frotu the city  the roariagors when tfcoy paroled Fikllitfil In tlxi linlirn. CAVTON, 0., fi. tv-t.'ir a. prominent farmer of Lexington town- ship, is on trial horc for a-isar.H and tory. While taking iu iho Tim hd'iy aftornoon Mrs. wifo of dofon'l.xnt, bfcamc liai-im tho of a v.-itT'.ns.i ;md rainti-d court r-jum. A physii-iit v called and after lying in a f-.r over an liour tho woman finally rcviv.d. Fiirinnr'i Som In 'WAPAKDXRTA. Sept.. Dennis son has just rr-ooived notillcatlon two grow a and .h'-> havo fallon hotrs to part, of a phia estate. The relati.vo '.vai on mother's sidn. and a rotirol morci-.attt. It stated tha'. thf ir shard of tho nit, Hudson i-i a f .inner, Irv four miles west of hero, in Mot.' township.________ ___ O. A K. Oinirnil- Ar.i.t A vrr., tiv-J is which have for several years twoon rival 'J. A. R. in thi? and havo ratiscd innuiiicraliio ro-.v., quarrels bntween tho veterans in the neijThborhood. have at last been ami- cably adjusted and tho old posts win go out of exisf'nco and a ri'-vv one with a motnborshi-.i of ni.-arly L-J or- ganized. _____ _ lleaT.v LIHS Kirn. CC.T-I.V.NATI. S'-pt. Karl v yostcr- day rooming fire was discovered in tjo flte-Story buildin? 10.12 and i i East Sovonth occupied by llfr- man Co., .liiverv.aro manufacturers, and Oj.'s shoo factory. Loss insured. Tho fire orlciriatol HI tho boiler room. Cnnroilrd. v Sopt r, A rornmtttee of the nriltiap employes of Todd A: O. on Thursday rocelved a coTnmiinloation from tho compaay cwncodin? their demand for nine with ton hours' jjav. and t.tie :.ien to return to nest Mori In C.'onntif .fnil. Sept. tod by c'-lr-o-J ...-nty cwln? :o the fact that Albert Sraiih. a HGfTO died in jail af tor a tsoath's -K-as not removed to a hospital. _ _ Snit for TTTOX. Sept. t. C.ttbarino C. War- ner IJoJi lor proptriy bf.-er. oa of tbo snio'KP. soot aa-1 vapor Jrom the It will bo a tost case. Smi'h Oay'ord, V> hoard a train" Fri- ptr-i-'-c b- a CI-.'-HnaM. 41: II I I P K r   

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