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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: August 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - August 27, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 202. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY AUGUSTS. 1890. TWO CENTS. of People Coiue Up Sinll- lug for Another Koouad With the Mainsrement of the Central Eoad ami Claim to be Sure of Success. Reported That All Knights of Labor on Vttmlcrbilt Connect Ing Called Out. AI.KAXY, Aug. of D. A. of this city, who are quite intimate with Mr. Powdcrly, stated yesterday that tho chief had said that the action of the Federation was merely a conserv- ative course they '.vsro eompelfcid to take by reason of their charter. The j word of sympathy, however, ivas merely a word of caution to the members of tho Federation to loo'.c out lor any encroach- ments upon their rights and Mr. Pow- derly believes that they will seize the first opportunity offered to strike. That opportunity ho ured'e.ts will occur be- j fore three da_i> are gone by. In fact Mr. assure! tho members of D. A. 24i5 at their secret meeting Monday night that a general strike would soon It is further claimed upon the part of the knights that as yet only part of their men are out on the Central road, and that when tho general order goes cut there will be more trouble. At the D. 11. yards about fifteen old hands and as many new ones went to work Tuesday morning, and the order refusing local freight has been counter- manded and local merchants aro happy. Superintendent Hammond says that tho road is now in good shape and simply suffered by a little delay. Tho road has nearly its full complement of men. The strikers, on the other hand, assert that the freight is being1 handled by half the complement of men and that If the road continues to handle freight from tho Central they will tie up the whole di- vision. Messrs. Wright and Devlin, of the General Executive Board. K. of L., were interviewed yesterday. "Tho action of tho board in the West was no surprise to us said Devlin. "We had anticipated such a move, and in fact had been assured by Mr. Sargent before he left New York that such action would have to be taken, as their charters did not allow a strike in sympathy. The knights, however, will have their direct support, and that means plenty of money and a general strike if in filling our places their rights are infringed upon." Mr. Wright said: "The impression seems to be that the fight is ended bo- cause a general strike has no; been or- dered. That is wrong. We did not ex- pect a general strike except ia our own order and that will occur at once. All that Mr. Powdcrly asked has been ac- corded him and the sympathy and finan- cial support of this order is with us. 1 f tbe engineers would take similar action we should feel oven more encouraged. I consider that we are in good condition to win this battle on Its merits." The pay car at West Albany yester- day paid men, strikers who form- erly worked in the shops. The question -.vaa: "Here is your pay. Do you want to If no answer was given in the affirmative, the man was discharged. Not one of tho accepted the offer to be taken back. XKW YORK, Aug. President Webb said yesterday that every thing along the entire lino of tha road was in good condition and that freight was moving briskly. In fact, as much freight nas niovr-d Monday as during any day preceding tbe strike, 540 cars alone hav- ing been exchanged with the Boston i Albany road. lie  cisioa byb-. ac -.-a-.uorusa 02 roil culls ixud ordering calls rt the I'.-j Til..- nous? aajouraed without -term cl-.u' the o! consMt-ration. tha S.-r.a-2t e.vr. r.t to debate on the bii! r s d-d get or d Dy unanimous consent The conf. r nc report DC the y Civil liill -.v b..t- v i a 'fx'--d -o. Tu "ill -.u prog- ress rau.Je in it- r u-o'i The psncrr ,y t -.-id n.c oxida wasam.-'aeil roducirir th.-> i l.Ttofa cents per ments d "ir-jTi c u were rejected The i n w..tcies -vas amiailoil by out th_> worfK "other than itohl" r -ni the words -so.d. wa'ch 4-ipercent ad t alorsra --iv on al! Dutches 25 per c- nu ad vat.ir. ui. Paraeruph relating to -iiac la blocks or wa-. amended bv reducin7 the duty from to pound. Paragraph ii" r-l 'fnp; to s 'ooir'K trTc.1 was amended by reduciujr tbe duty from 3S to 10 per cent and udtiing wor.U a duty of .iO cent on veueers, not Snecially pro i Kl> d for Parn-'ranh 217 (picljr-ls ard was by the duly from Ju pur cent, to 10 per tent, nu'l >n- r the duty to 3 c. uts p r thou-.and. Mr. Aldnch moved to pai 321, a y of 10 per cer.i ch.v.r c.ine, mnniifacturert bin not made into fin-.shed arti- cles, by striking out the words "manufactured lilt not m ide -.nto finished 'irtloies" and Insert Ueu o.'them the word- "or ree.'.s. whether wrought or manufaciuro'l rrom raunns or reods an.', whether oua.l s laaro 01 auy shape." The amendment was agreed to. Dcsinictioii of McVicker's The- nter la Chicago. One of the Finest Structures of Its Kii'.tl in tho West Succumbs to Fierce THE BALf, FLAYERS. of vn-... elation Urotli- erhood (xHinex. Following are the scores of Tuesday's games: NATIONAL LEAOUE. At New Chicago 4, New York 2. At 3. Hoston 10. At Cleveland 5, Phila- delphia 9. At Cincinnati 0, Hrooklvn 3. AMERICAN" ASSOCIATION. At Athleti'-s S, 11. I'LAYKlc-' I.r.AOUE At Chicag-o 1, Boston elev- en innings. At New Pittsburgh 1, New- York 11. At Cleveland 1, Phila- delphia 15. At Buffalo Brooklyn IT. BADLY WKKCKED. V O. Pnvm-'i-rfr Train Runs Into Open Sw-itiili Ulth Fatal HAUPEU'P FKRHY, Va., The Chicago express on tbe Baltimore Ohio road, due hero e.irly last evening-. ran into an open switch near foiat of Rocics. u'lioro it tljtil were lyinp on the sidintr und was badly wrecked. The engineer, David Ziler, who had boon in the employ of tho coir.- pany for twenty years, was instantly killed- The fireman was tally injured. The engine, baggage auJ postal cars were wreckoa. Tho balance of tho train was derailed, but no serious consequences followed. Tue passengers were severely shaken up, but none were seriously injured- Food First, Rout Afterward. 37. Speaking at a League mooting last night Mr. Timothy Healy, referring to the potato blight in Ireland, said that nothing stood between the people and during the coming winter. The stifferors mijr'u not logrally withhold rents, but the mar. who paid rent and left his family to st.irvo was little better than an as.sas-.in. If it was found necessary to appeal to the Irish in America ancl Australia the as- sistance thus obtained ought not to bo shared by any man who had paid rent iurinj: prooMi-g months. The Cramer Aug. The Navy Department denies the report that or- ders have bfen issued to tho cruiser Philadelphia for another trial trip. This vessel has been accepted by the Government, having fulnlled all the re- quirements of tbe contract. Another trip will be ordered, howov-r, within four months after the date of tho ac- ceptance of the vessel by the Govern- ment. This trip, which will be a sea voyage, is taken for tho purpose of demonstrating that the vessel maintains its contract requirements. Strike Itectnrml O.T. ing. cloak- makers' strike, whioh has been in- prog- ress eighteen weeks, was declared off Monday night and tbe strikers resumed work yesterday. The settlament was reached through tbe mediation of Rev. S. Morals. Jewish rabbi, and George Banderof, agent for tbe Tfciron Ffirsch fund and tbe Association of Jewish Im- migrants. Leas tban 100 of the 400 or- iginal strikers arc now the others harine gone to Chicago and New York. The Hirer and Harbor 15111. on the Hirer and Harbor Appropriation bili yesterday began consideration of the Senate amendments. prorres.-. was Tisane, but as tho confcr-'-os had not to as- of tho sattors ur.dor car, V formed jot of the wbicb j wii; be to through the bill. Several Flremoo Injureil In tho to Save thp Orer C.'ih.vi.o. Thea- ter wa-s al-nos: totally destroyed by fire a: four i-Vlo-jk T; csd.iy morning. The wan of ihe building, reaching eiffht i-.: h 'ijrht, went down with n tcr-iCc crash into the narrow alley. John ,1 pipeman of Engine Coni- p No. 7, came down with tho debris and lauded fairly on his head on a jeiirg P d pile of mortar and brick. Ho was fearfully mangled, but will likely re- cover. Duffv's comrades or. the roof barely escape i ita their lives. They heard the wail crodking and ran to the center of tbo rout" just as groat down. They subsequently escaped to tho street by means of a fire escape. The fire started in the basement of w's saloon, which occupies the west half of the building, and smold- ered amon? piles of straw and liquors for nearly an hour before it was discov- ered. By that time flames had burst through the basement windows. When tho department arrived every thing under the big theater, including dress- ing rooms, stage paraphernalia and bapgag-e, was ablaze. The fire was burn- ing so fiercely that a second battalion of engines was called out and it was all they could do to keep the flames from eatinsr a path into tho upper stories of the building. As it was the foyer and the chairs In the parquette circle oaujfht fire at one time and blazed brightly until four or five streams of water wore turnod on the flames. The firemen chopped holes in the floor, tore down tho costly hangings that ornamented the main entrance, and even broke through the stage in their anxiety to save the building. Before they got through tho theater proper was nearly ruined. The loss to the thbater and building will not be less than 000. The entire interior of the theater is practically destroyed. What with water, smoke and the use of axes, which latter was rendered necessary to reach the basement, tho theater will have to bt; entirely rebuilt and renovated. That it was a flre trap was sliown from the way the flames ran through the whole TCvory thing in it burned lik a tinder box, despite all the flromon could do. Five of flremen who had been stationed near the main entrance barely escaped with their lives. The brave fellows were pushing through to the stage when they heard a loud croak- ing above tueir heads. They instantly retreated and had barely gotten outside into the lobby when tboroar of the fall- ing galleries and dome told of the de- struction of tho theater. W. Miller, a truckman, and another fireman wero also injured, but not fatally. The firo fcommunicatod to several small hotels in the immediate vicinity, but did no seri- ous damage. The guests wore panic- stricken, but all escaped in The front ofiicos of the building received littlo damage except by water and the trinav's to do business at their oM stands. Mr. McVifkor is now it Saratoga. I Ms son and manager says the theater will be rebuilt and reoponcd inside of thirty days. Mr. Al. Hay man, who owns Shenan- 1 -ah, :h? pi 17 thit has boon atMcVick- 3r'3 Theater for the past three months, said yesterday that he had arranged tomplete his Chicago time with that play at the Auditorium. Mr. Hayman ;lso said that the tour of Shenandoah r.-ould in no way bo interfered with by ;he presont 'lisastor. as ha had duplicate iconory and costumes in New York ivhicb would be bore to-day. Attempt to Wreck Train. GKANT> IstANn, Neb., Aujr. 37. An- Dtbor attempt was made to wreck the test mail on the Union Pacific Monday night between here and Chapman by're- woTing a rail A tramp, wno claimed to have soon the men at work, reported the matter to agent at Chapman, who held the train, until the nil oould be replaced. The wu attested. A similar attempt WM made to wreck tne fast mail last Friday, a result of which a freight 'went through a cnlrcrt near here, wrecking A Doctor GRAND K. D., Aug. Dr. Bahrson. of Crookaton, was saot three times and killed at Fisher, twelTe miles north of here, yesterd 17, by a man named RassclL The murderer fled to tho woods and is now being pursued by crowd intent on lynching Mm. Rus- sell bis wife separated a short time ho attributed trouble to Dr. influence. Rassell is lazy. sbifi'icsa fellow an-i public opinion sides with thr maa. Aar. State Do- j part'S'-nt is is apparent of j tsry Wbartos ?aid jester- dar that tbe is ia ifc'J aotb- i iag official laviagbcea be FIT.I.S. X. Y., Aajf. Tho L. A. w. a-nanai festivities opened bore v with parade ia which r-en A lantern pa- planned for the which tV- -Ai- spoiled. Srst bad she FUls ranTJr.? track. Fare people Saw tho wbicb was of hlgb O.. Aug. reJssed to islerfere ia tie BrocVy Sslti xzA Otto Lestfs. saitedaaa'i October The case of HARTFORD, Coaa.. Aug. 27. -The ter Oak Park bcfM The was Seary mak- of fMt tiaw. TW aoaed vaiil Tbe race, parte was a walkover for VTarfwell ia ftraiirbt ttw KM Slew Turn of Affairs at the Stock Yards. Hie SwltcMn? Association Dissolves anJ the ileu are Left Ont In the Cold. Dumber of Chlcngo Alton Switchmen Strike Iterance of Chnnge In Foremen Trntllc a CuiCAt.o, A.U.S. strike of the switchmen of the Stock Yards Switching after the grievances of tho snyineers and firemen had boon ad- ,usted Monday afternoon, put a new phase on tha situation and Tuesday nornin? it was decided to dissolve the issociation and allow each road to doits switching. The striking switch- men were told that their services were no longer required and new wore procured to do the Superin- tendent Marsh at the head of SOO polico- wont down co the Stock Yards to charge of the pohro urra-.igemonts shere and to see that no acts of violence are committed by the strikers. Tho strikers now, instead of asking an increase of wages, waiir. their old po- sitions and former salaries. They have sent a committee to the railroads asking to be taken back. Tho men hoped to bo backed up in their strike by tbe firemen and engineers, but in this they wore disappointed. Tho dissolution of tho Switching Association also had consid- erable to do with the men's backing down. Several railroads began doing a switching business in the yards yes- terday afternoon, without interference. About eighty switchmen in the em- ploy of the Chicago Alton railroad in this city went out on strike yesterday morning. Passenger traffic is not being interfered with, but freight traffic in the ya -ds has been entirely suspended. Some months ago a foreman in the Chi- cago Alton yards loft tho company's employ and went to work for another road. Yesterday the company re-cm- ployed him and attempted to install him in his old position. The men in the meantime had become attached to the foreman who succeeded and struck against any change. General Manager Chappell said that the company would simply take the de- fensive and never re-employ a single striker. The foreman in whoso behalf the men struck, he said, was incompe- tent and tho company proposed to 311 his place as it saw fit. Tho men de- manded promotion from tho ranks and the company was perfectly willing to accede to this demand when acceptable men were at hand. In the present case, however, the company was compelled to re-employ one of its old mon who had entered the service of another road, be- cause there was no ono among the strikers capable of filling the place. SONS OF VETERANS. The Annual Encampment at St. JoAeph, Mo. Large Attendance and Much Enthualiksm. ST. JOSEIMC, Mo Aug. 27. Thirty thousand strangers were in St. Joseph Tuesday, attending the national en- campment of Sons of Veterans. The encampment opened with Commander Griffin in tho chair. After the call of the.- roll and tho appointment of a com- mittee on credentials a recoss wai taken. At ono o'clock tho, business session con- vened. Commander Griffin's address was road and the applause was hearty. The grand parade took place at throe p. m. and it ia estimated that mon worn in lino. The parade made up of Sons of Veterans, G. A. R. members aud members of various socrot organi- zations. National Farmers' CKrviiA, Nf.b., Aug. The National Farmers' Congress mot at Council Bluffs yesterday. Delegates wore present from Alabama, North Dakota, Illinois, Iowa. Kansas, Maine, Missouri, Michigan, Montana, Now Jersey, New Mexico, Nebraska, Indiana, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. President K. S. Kalb, ot Alabama, presided. Gov- ernor Boies made a short address, fol- lowed by John Scott, of Nevada, la., who made the formal speech of wel- come. In his address President Kalb re-viewed the condition of the farmers. Tratatnvn Ask for More Pay. CmcAOO, Aug. 87. The committee representing the Illinois Central rail- road employes in tbe train tertice, which has been preparing a new sched- ule of wages, called on General Manager Beck yesterday. They presented their schedule and requested Its adoption. What the incressc Is that they roquost can not bo exactly learned, but it ranges from five to thirty per cent Tbe com- mittee were assured that the schedule would be carefully considered and an answer jriven them in ten days. roiM atom. Ei. Tex.. Another dis- astrous rain risited E5 Paso and Paso del Norse last livening. The water came down in torrents from the moun- tain side, flooding the streets and doin? much damage. At Paso del Korte tbe rcayor and the entire police force, with many volunteers, did all In their poww to protect the business part of tbe city by dirertinf the water cbaantlc where all tbe barm possible bad alroadj been done. No waa drowsed. to KfH YORK, Aug. CT.-Dr. Edward SinJcxn, aged editor of New Tork IlaodeU Zeitung, yonterday a detenniaed effort to commit cMe. He firvt took awpUno, and this proTinf atebbod hiiMelf tto body. tontd towMblMdiifaTafMvay. He LATEST NEWS JTEMS. Qathervct by Prom all T-rU ol Earth. WEDNESDAY. AITOTOT 37. A pleasure boat wascapsir.edthe otbei day at Deal, England, and seven of the occupants were drowned. Mark n. Dunnell has been renomi nated for Congress by the Republicans of the First Minnesota district. The demands of tho dockers at South- ampton have been rejected tho em- ployers and a strike on a great scale is belieTed to be Imminent, Fire has destroyed the whole of the town of Tokay, Hungary, tho ex- ception of thirteen houses Tokay is the entrepot for tho celebrate 1 Tokay wines. Tho Czar has negatived the proposal of the Kaiser for a simultaneous with- drawal from the contiguous frontier of tho armed forces of il.issia. Austria and Germany. Oespite the return of strikers to work at Mnns. ai-e at present fully 18.000 minors on strike In Belgium and thoro is no iunnt-di itc prospect of a set- tlement of the trouble. new signal telegraph station on Tory Island, tbe northwest coast of Ireland, was opened recently by the Duke of Abercorn. Hcroaftor Atlantic vessels pnssincr north of Ireland will bo reported from this station. Tbe railroad company w'ik'h is mak- ing desperate efforts to secure from tho Swiss government a right of way up tho famous Matterhorn is meeting with earnest opposition from tho people, who regard the proposal as ono of desecra- tion. At Carbonado. Wash., tho other day, Mrs. Mary Wilson and her Infant child wore Instantly killed by a falling treo. Mrs. Wilson with the babe In her arms was In tho cemetery sitting on tho grave of ono of her children when the troe fell on them. One thousand of tho striking Belgian miners have returned to work. It. Is sug- gested that the real objui't sought to bo obtained by tho striking miners was the making of a formidable demonstration in favor of'universal suffrage. William C. Hunt, chief of the popu- lation division. Census Ollico. has an- nounced the result of the count of tho population in the following States: Rhode Island, population in- crease since 1SSO, US.S12, or por cent. Idaho, population increase or 153 per cent The cruiser San Francisco has loft San Francisco for Santa Barbara, Cal., to begin her olHcial trial trip. Tho trip will cover several days. If tho vessel exceeds tho cor.ffact requirements tho contractors will rccclveyiO.OOO premium for evory quarter knot above tho cou- tract speed. A substitute for tbe bill ponding in the Senate providing for transfer of tho revenue marine from tho Treasury to the Navy Department has boon intro- duced by Senator Sherman. Under its provisions the Secretary of tho Treas- ury is authorised to plnco on waiting or- ders, with waiting orders pay, any offi- cer of the revenue marine who la totally disabled or who is sixty-two years of age, ot who has served forty years. Democratic Convention Forecnntii. SpnixttFiEi.-n, 0-, Aug. 27 -Arrange- ments for the Democratic State conven- tion which will convene hero to-day arc perfect. Judging from tho amour.t cf favorable comment made upon Thoodoro E. Cromloy, of Plokaway County, by leading Democratic pnpors tho State, it look.s as though thatgontleman would bo named for Secretary of State. Tho drift of opinion soums to set toward Judge B'.ari'li'i, of Cleveland, for 3u- preraO Judgf, and Pajitiin Leopold Koi- for, of Miami County, looks like tho coming man for Boarl of Worko. THE MAllEJETa Flour.   closed steady. Currency 5s at nsvi 4s. coupon, ot do at NEW YORK. Aug. Mlone- sola o.-tra at J3.35afl.il6, city mill extra at gupcrUne at Strong. No. 2 rod eaKb at II. 10, do Auifust at do September nt tl.OSJf 2 mlxeil cnsh at .17Kc, do her No. 8 mUcd cash ut 44Kc, do Septem- ber at 41 KC. Poiuc-Mens at Sl2.rO3n3L.VX Unch %n gcd. Western creamery fancy 23o. Western flat Western t CHICAGO, Aug. Septembor nt UOT. SeplcmOor 49c, October Auyost at 3Tc. September ot PoRK-ABgast September .it at JW.T5. LAkD-ScptorohcratW.W, October W.40. I5.3SH. K.4TH. TOLEDO, Market of and al li.fBii. Qaiot. Sslos ot ot Sic, He. QoVet. S GHICA9O, flnn at Market t at 10 bcsv ts at Strong aad Kfc higher (or Cosirr.oato sXer- at st Texzaa Steady. Inferior to fclr brst at f Sirez? ATD SWKilpr. eoni LreKimr. Aag. 9Wvnf. 4J6, com iy. at vy oora ATr7.e-Marlwt MS OF IE STAIR Ohio Happenings of Lrite A. O. U. AV. Ohlu Loilcc of Onlei of Worktuon CLEVELAND, Aug-. i7. I egatea, urp-.v loivc1-, convened iu Halle's Hull Tucsd foi the session of the Ohio Grand i vJ'.-e of the Aucieut Order of rmu-il Wnrciiicu Tho Grand Lodge, i> >'t officers was fully r  tb' ;rack a'.i'-.vV '-f online, and slipncd un'l ffll ona of the rails. Thu v.-bo'-'ls of s'..! of tho locomotive1 passed diroctly over tbu unfortunate's nock, thu bead from tho body as cleanly as if tbo -.vurk had been done with a guillotine. FurmrrH J'ltc i'olUiCK EAST O.. -7 -Tho farmers of this .section of C'lln-'iliift'ia County mot at Smith's six rnllos from this city, yesterday, a larjro num- ber being present. Mr. Tli'-kson. of Farmers' Alliance of Kansas, organized a branch of tho Alliance. A number of branches of this have already been formed in this county, ftnd a convention will be held at Kcw Lis- bon next week to put a county tickut in tto field. _______________ StriK-k OH. SAXDIJSKV, 0., Aug. Citi- zens of Upper Sandusky and residents of north western Wyandot County aro jftcatly excited over the drilling in of a oil welL At tbe lea-it calculation tbe flow is estimated barrels a day. Tho Standard Oil Company pur- chased the riulso and Hurd farms, whicb adjoin this, for which they paid SlOOper _______________ Thrown Ont of n nniK7 an'l CAMDK.V, O., While Mrs. Bert A. Goodwin, of PbarcK, of E'.klon. worf out riding iMon- day afternoon noar that awsy, throwing win ont, killing hf-r instantly crcsh- inx her skull on tbe supposed Xr btt la-iiiy tto for i, O., Aug. OCratic convention of ibe (Tressional district, comprise-! of i Clinton, Favrtva. tics, as-l JR co- John Q. Smith, of Ciictoa County, by acclamation. Tbe district Repobtioan. _______ to tefent child of ai this Ml backwud iavo a oi bot wfttor MotxUy evening, il m 'ff-U I IW 1 IS w !HJ it 1 I il II m m 1 fliM'il lii ififi IH ?m ill-   

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