Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Salem Daily News: Thursday, August 21, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - August 21, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. IL NO. 197. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY AUGUST 21. 1890. TWO CENTS. J Latex Details of tbe Wilkesbarre Disaster. Eleven People Were Killed and Fatally Injnrad During the Cyclone. Property Will Amoont to of Dectractton oa WILKESBAKRE, Pa., Aug. city presents a scene of awful devasta- tion. After the cyclone had spent fury Tuesday evening darkness fell so quickly upon the valley and the excite- ment everywhere was so intense that it was impossible to get any intelligence as to the extent of the damage to prop- erty and the loss of lifo. Now, how- ever, tho severity of tho cyclone is more and more demonstrated, and it is re- markable that so few livos were lost. Immense buildings in which were many people were unrooted and in many cases almost instantlv demolished, and this at a time when Wilkesbarre's streets are most crowded. It is indeed singular how so many people escaped the flying timber and debris of every character: Around the depots, the most frequented part of tho city, the worst scenes are presented, and when H is remembered that passengar freight car-, were lifted from the tracks upon which they stood and laid upon their sides, while Other cars were rushed along tho track by the great forco of the cyclone, a small concoction of its terrific velocity may be obtained. So suddenly did the storm make its appearance that the stoutest hearts were appalled. Tremendous thunderbolts and light- ning began to assort themselves about o'clock. It was evident that a heavy downpour of rain would come upon the town in a few and all who could sought shelter. Later an unusual center of activity was noticeable in the vicinity of Leo Park. The lower clouds began scudding in great circles at ter- rific speed. A suddon gust of wind sprang up and in a moment had in- creased to a roar. The Vulcan iron works, James foundry and the Keystone flour mill folt the first shock. Heavy material of all descriptions was dashed about like so much chaff. Main street wus in tho direct of the storm and the buildings on the west side of that thoroughfare suffered badly. Shade troos woro uprooted, and in fact but little was left untouched on Main street until Academy street was reached. Brick dwellings wero unroofed and the upper stories torn and some woro leveled to the ground. Fallen trees and timbers completely blocked South Main and Franklin streets. The storm swept along the railroad tc Five Points, where it turnexi eastward again, up Pearl street, out by Baltimore shaft, No. 2, then dashed up tho moun- tains and spent itself in the woods. The sweep of tho cyclone at Five Points was terrible. Tbe frail houses were blown away and the air was filled with debris from tho falling buildings. On Scott street the houses occupied by tho fami- lies of James McGinloy and James Hcn- agan woro levol'v to the ground. Mrs. Elila McG-inley and her young baby were crushed to de--th. as was John Mc- Ginley, a youth of thirteen years. Mary McGinnis, the little daughter of this most unhappy household, was so man- gled and crushed that sho will probably not survive. Tho Barber asphalt works, S. L. Brown Co.'s extensive b isiness block, comprising ton wholesale stores; the Murray coal breaker and the Holland breaker were so   forcos '.iow in sxistonc-e arp cup'iMo of supplying all reasonable war.tv: that the interests of should be paramount to tho special of any trade or occupa- tion; that tho abolition of the wage should bo declared imperative, and the establishment of a system of co-operative owner-hip and of tho means of production is a necessity. THK ASIATIC SCOUKGE. MS OF m Sffl Story of Life iu Ohio Told In Different Cities. Tlmt CholiTH Slay Spreml In II mi y 1'eojiU' EtpoitMl to Coll- ttftKlon. Losnox, 21. A private inter- view with the doctor who examined tho cholera patient, Robert Loipb, elicited the fact that he wandered freely about the East End boforc ho became so ill that ho obligcnl to sfo to bed. During his wanderings he drank and conversed with a number of persons. Tho doctor has no doubt whatever that many per- sons have contracted tho disease in the coffee house where Leigh lodged, and expressed tho fear that it will spread rapidly. There is no question that tho man is suffering from Asiatic cholera in its worst foria. Tho disclosure of the nature of tho man's ailment has created a panic in tho neighborhood of his lato lodging place. though the health authorities display a greater degree of alarm than do tho peo- ple who have been exposed to the dis- ease. _ _ War ItlomllrM. LONDON, Aucr. 21. Juencmann, of Vienna, has invented iv fluid, the use of which ho claims will minimize tho hor- rors of war, it almost bloodless. The fluid is to be placed in a shell, projected in tin- ordinary manner, which is so constructed that it will burst in falling or striking any object ottering but slight resistance. The fluid upon being released so affects persons inhal- ing ita odor that they immediately be- come unconscious and remain in that state half an hour or more. Tho in- ventor is endeavoring to obtain a tost of his invention by the military authori- ties. Jfcir York Fireman's Convention. WATETITOWS, N. Y.. Any. yes- terday's session of tho State Firemen's Association. Herkimer was chosen as the place for holding the next conven- tion. Charles S. Rogers, of Hudson, wa3 elected president The committee ap- pointed to report on the acts of Presi- dent Irish in dragging the association into politics, reported that there were good ground-s for complaint. Hack to the Old Aug. a meeting here yesterday between W. H. Waiffe and Billy Harnie, representing the Bal- timore base ball club, late of too At- lantic Association, end Zuck I'helpsand W. n. repr-'-seaiiag the American Association, a formal contrast Tuesday night and did not return yes- terday morning. American Asuocitttton SAHATOGA. Aug. thirteenth annual meeting of the American Bar As- sociation was called to order in Putnam Music Hall yesterday by the president, ex-Governor Hitchoook, of Missouri. About 300 members wore present, repre- senting nearly ovory State and Terri- tory in the Union. Proceedings were opened with the annual address by tho president. Tbe reports of tte secretary and treasurer, showing tbe association to be in a flourishing condition, were read and adopted. Tbe total member- ship now ozceeds N. T., Aug. Trav- drawn up and a-imittin? tho elir.r Passen-or Aunts' Association has re ciub to full rrernbcriaip in concluded its business Ealtiraor the American Association. lo Charge of YOKK. Aug. Web- ster, tbe actor, who and killed Rob- eft Tuesday for supposed intimacy with Webster's wife, was yes- terday remaaded to the custody of the coroner- Mrs- Webster denies that she and McNeil had boen oa teraa of Inti- macy- _______________ riot to ftofc X- T., Aug. 21. An at- tempt to tap the wires DO tbe race trank aad rob the bookmakers frustrated jwMrday trv tbe viffilsaoe of a Westera Union limemaa. But for a bungling jW> of isaklng the wrong wooU .g. The folio-wing officers were elected for the ensuing rear: President, W. R. Jones, St. Louis: Vice President. A. Hotch- insoa, BufJalo; Secretary aod Treasurer, II. C Uolabird, Cincinnati. Tne next annual meeting will be Jrerd at Lookout Mountain, Tea a. It decided to a fond for tbe of widows orphans of deceased members. Meat Inspection 15111 Hoth Houses Itoiolutlon Oubiitcd Without r'Lrml Actitfi. WASHINGTON, AUIJ House spcrt most of iho morninj hour yesterday de- bating the Allen Laud bill, which was flnafly lain on the Uiblo. Tbe bill to jiay claims ot la borers umlor t'.ie Eight Hoar taw was takun up. tut went wi hout actioii. The House adopted a resolution) from tho Committee on Foreign Reliitions calllnc on the President for information concerning the enforcement of the Russian edict ag.-iiiibt tbe Jews. The Senate providing for of meats for export was then taken up and passed. The- Lard bill WM then deb.itcd without linn! action. the Son-ite the Quay resolution providing for an order of business nas, debated. Mr. Snootier moved to refer the resolution and Mr. Hoar s propos-ifl amendments to the raittee on Rules, but ut the end of the morning hour the whole sub'rect went over und the tariff bill wrvs taken up and one pnge disposed of. The Senate concurred lii the House amendments to the Agricultural Colk-g-j bill and the Meat Inspection bill.________________ Not So Lucky. Afttir AJLU BUFFALO, Aug. Haas, of this city, bad a Kansas City lottery ticket in tho drawing which camo off August 12. Tho ticket drew and ho sent it on by tbe American Express Company. Not hearing from it Haas wired tbe express company at Kansas City and yesterday received a stating that tho lottery company would not pay the ticket when presented and claiming that the manager of the con- cern had skipped with the prize money. The local agent hore, a barber, has been in the habit of cashing small prizes him- self. Ho is from S300 to 3300 out on deal.______________ Worst Storm In X. Y-, Aug. most electric storm this season visited the upper Hudson valley Tuesday night. Rain fell in torrents and tho lightning was terrific- Boatmen say it was the worst night that they had experienced on the river in years. Craft of all kind were forced to lay up, owing to the dense darknosa. Within a radius of twenty miles of city the reflection of half a dozen flres caused by lightning Illumined the The loss to fruit will reach Alliance Convention. DALLAS, Tex., Aug. Tho conven- tion of the Farmers' Alliaucc of Texas, representing- nearly votors, was called to ord'or hero Tuesday by its pres- ident, Dr. Field, wrioso message was then rea'l. It covered tho wholo Hold of Alliance economy und recommended tho destruction of land monopoly, State con- trol of rai Iroiiclh, tho destruction of com- binations to depiess the price of farmers' products, the working of State B, Wts., Anf. 91. Tbe Re- publican contention met bere tenUy. The platform Indorses Hanri- adtniaUtratioti aod tbe Draaett soajralmrj education law. Goremor Hoard was aoaaiaavwl for Governor R Tr The 3 r, The sessions of the Society of Americaa Florists were romcd yesterday. It was voted to bold tbe next meeting In Toronto. John Thorpe, of New York, aad E. 0. Hill, of Indiana, were appointed to a conference at Chicaeo oa Augut 97 la action on the best of at tin Avff. DM rwtpited William H. Smltk, tbe County wordetw, atnttb AM tMM convict? within the walls of tiarlcs, and thi> cutting out of dlo men of commerce. poniten tho mid- MLGLIONAIKE_WAD E'S A Remarkable Document of it VMt Sjriupntky Wltb Orthodox O., Aug. was made in probate court. Wednesday, to probate the will of J. H. Wade. A trust fnnd of is formed by the will, of which J. H. Wade, Jr., George A. Garn-ttson and W. S. Jones are the trustees. The will directs that out ot this fund shall be annuities amounting to to numerous friends and at- tendants, and tho balance of tho iucoroc Shall ho d'.vtded between Mrs. A. L- Ev- erett and J. 11. Jr., former tc receive tliroo-fourths nnd the laticrone- fourth of tho snra. Ilf directs per year IM taVou by hUlrusti os for tho promotion of liberal religion or spiritual philosophy, or both, or in Mici purcha-'Q of books and yiublU-ruions in further- ance of the samp, and hi-, trustpus shall not bo responsible to -luv fur the manner in which thoy shall exorcise this discretion, "provided, that no part of said funds shall bo given. 01 up- propriatod for tho benefit of what is known as orthodox religion. Nor shall any of said funds be used for tho bone- fit or support of any church or religion in which the blasphemous and iloteala- doctrino of eternal punishment or otornal misery is encouraged, taught or The trust will eml when tho persons receiving annuities amounting to 93.3UO are dead and the fund will then bo di- vided between Mrs. A. L. Evorctt and J. H. Wade, Jr. To Mrs. S. T. T-verett is given outright. S. V. Everett receives The Cleveland Vrotes- tant orphan asylum gets SS.iXM) and tbe Children's Aid Society the same au.uunt. Tho residue of tho estate oC all kinds is left to J. II. Wade, Jr., for his solo and exclusive benefit. BADLY DKMOUAL17iKP. A Siirpvlno Wtiicii Col- ic-n Out of Tlu-ir C. H., O., Aug. Ninth Battalion Colored O. N. G. has broke camp hore. A very exciting In- cident took plaop at the camp the othor night. Company E white O N. U, of Washington C quietly marched out to the cainn just before midnight under command of Lieuten- ant Ely. Thoy stationed themselves in throo squads around the camp, and at a given slgnaloponod flrcon the encamped battalion. None of tlioui, tin, ex- ception of the head knew that the attack was to be iaailo, itnd tho re- sult was that they wore badly fright- ened. They fairly tumblo.il over each other in their alarm. Tho huffier and drummer boys got in thoir work, and thq demoralized colored troops woro soon formed in to companies. Thoy all rushed to the side of the camp whore the firing had opened, and Lieu- tenant Ely thon raarehed his men in at the ami took tho camp, lie found it vacated and moved ou to whoro the battery was stationed and -where the conflict was hottest. Tbe colored troops took tho field piece, but it was sonn res- cued again by tho daring white militia of C.i m pa ny E. orcil Middlrton I" Hard f.uck. OTTAWA, Ont., Aug MojorOcneral Middleton. who was forced to resign hi? command of thoCanaclinnmilitla, left for England with his family on Tuesday. The sudden departure of the General caused quite a sensation. Just before the train left J. 15. Tackborry. accom- panied by a detective, arrived on the scone and demanded from the Gen- eral, tho commission on tho salo of his household furniture, which will be sold in a few days. Mr. Grundy, of tho Hank of Montreal, came to the Guncral's rescue and gave security for the amount, when tbe General was released. Canght by Th'lcf. KANSAS CITY, Aug. -J. J. Somors. while driving in Cass County on Mon- day. passed a man driving a horse and cart which Somers recognized as prop- erty that had been stolen. Ho ordered the thief to surrender, but tho lattci drew a revolver and commanded Somors to get out of his wagon. He thon took a watch and 312. 50 from Seiners, got in- to Somers' rig and drove away. lie baa not been captured. Demand DtrjrQt'E, la., Aug. 21. Committees representing tbe trainmen of tho Illinois Central road from New to Sioux City yesterday presented petitions tc their respectivRdivision superintendents asking for an increase of wages all along the line and for the granting- of certain privileges. The movc-mcnt includes all passcngor and freight rr.cn employed on the system with tbe exception of P.rc- men and engineers. TO DEATH. n BALTIMOKK, Aug. Patrick Harris the well-knowa theater owner, died Wednesday at Bay Shore. L. L He had fcoen to Carlsbad for bis s-nd had returned, as was believed, roach ira- piroTed- Mr. Harris controlled theaters in Pittsburgh. Washington. Louisville. Cincinnati, Minneapolis, St. Paul and SRW'TOBK. Aug. 21. -Charles who taken the place of striker, fwn-1 dead on his train when It reached Seventy-ninth lawt vreaiBf. He wae all re at DoyreUwhen be was sitting oa lita There a mark on his bead that may have been made with Vfck Ot Cuugiit Hot Ornpnt'iwu. AKKOK, 0., Aug. A accidont occurrr-d Tuesday at on tbs Valley railway, a few rnilos from Akron, At noon hour, aftor lunch, tbn employes of Carnp tt Thompson's tile ad- journed to a neighboring field to play ball. Aftor returning to the works ii few minutes later they were surprised to find tho machinery stopped, although the engine was still running. The body of the engineer, Isaac Iloovor, was found caught bot.voon a belt aud n wheol on which it ran to convoy power to a pump. The bo'ly rested on top of the wheel, face downward, and the belt across Hoover's breast had crushed out his Death ir.-ist havo beon'instan- taneous, as tbo pipe which Hoover was smoking was still held between his Hps. Ohio Conrlmrc. TOI.KDO, Aug. The Grand Cotnmandory of Ohio Knights Tornplat met in this city Wednesday morning at Memorial Hall. The buiy was wol- comed on behalf of tho city by ilayoi Hamilton and on behalf of Toledo plars by Past Eminent Commandet Barton Smith. Response was made by Grand Commander Perkins, of Akron. Reports were submitted showing the Commanderios to in excellent condi- tion. In the afternoon a grand parade took place and last owning a reception was tendered to visitors at Memorial Hall. Tho city is beautifully decorated. Cnt Illi Tliront W th a kazor. O.. An? Dr. A Johnson attempted suicide evening by cutting bis throat r.-lth 3 razor. Ho had some tro.iWo v.-jth Simonton, landlord of the Hotel, about his board, and upon him, when warded him ofT with a chair, ran TO-A-H stairs and Soon reinraed -with assi Vance, and focaJ that the doctor bad cut throat was still cutting, when the razor wat taken from him. A physician was has- tily summoned, the wound and he will recover. p., Aug. Third Regiment, Ohio National Goarte. baa gone into camp at Silver beautiful sheet of cillw west of About -tot encamped, which nvvber will by LofM Coaitty Sons last days at will n f ii; I 3 n it. I ?8 'liis II s r.W [ill lii   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication