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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II. NO. 191. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY AUGUST H. 1890. TWO CENTS. fi i B, EMIT. Business Session Addressed bj General Alger. General Veasey, of Vermont, lo Detroit Gets Xeit Eucaiiipmeut. Showing the Streugth of the Or. nnlzatiun .Hcetinpof the Natiunttl Con- vention of the Woman's Kellef Corps. Aug. The session of the Rational Encampment of the O. A. R. was opened at. Music Hall Wednesday, and the delegates from the different departments of the Union comprised as fine a body of men as ever met in de- liberative assembly. The hall was beaunfully decorated and 'he floor ea'.ir-'ly occupied bj delegates, whilo the balconies, which were set apart for mtui'ic-rs of the Grand Army, filled with veterans. Uener-il buennan was one of trie first to arrive and ho took; a seat with the Missouri department, although urq-ed to go upon the platform. fle was w.irmly greeted by the oomradod was tho centre of attraction. There was some cor.f'ision in the a-t- rangeim-nt of banners to designate the dnfi-ront -States, owing to the failure ol some person to perform a dr. ry assigned, and the convention was obliged to pro- ceed to business without placing the banners where they belonged. A meet- in? of the National Council of Admin- istration dolaved the opening proceed- ings and it was eleven o'clock when Genoral Alger appeared upon the plat- form. After prayer. General Alger said it was the wish of tho commander and of all comraJcs that General Sherman should come to tho platform. General Sherman amid great applause and eaid ho preferred to remain with the Missouri delegation. General Alger said: "Your wish is my oidi-r, but 1 prefer that you COTOO upon ihc platform." General Sherman declined to leave his scat aud General Alger made a brief apology for a lack ol time to prepare his address as he de- sired. Inspector General Gri filth re- ported the order growing numerically stronger and working earnestly and har- moniously in furthering the grand ob- jects for which it was organized. No or- ganization on earth decs more to minis- ter to tho helpless and unfortunate. EC presented a table shoeing that the number of posts iu tho Grand Army on June was number of com- rades in yood standing in posts inspect- ed to ,lune 30. 831, '244: number of posts inspected, Number of posts not inspected. Total amount expend- ed for charity, ?2S3.5riG; amount remain- ing in relief fund, The report of Surgeon General Hor- ace P. Porter, of ilaine, recommends that inspectors be required to examine post officers as to their knowledge ot department and general matters per- taining to the organization. The care of thf destitute and needy comrades, tho burden of free medical attendance, free medicines and free surgical appli- ances should bo assumed by the Gov- ernment that these poor comrades helped to save. Tt is recommended that the medical officers of the late war should form State and national organizations and should admitted to full privileges in depai tmcnt encampments, that the physical disabilities of comrades may be discussed and measures devisad for t'uoii relief. Ac the afternoon session officers were clot-ted, the principal position- going tc the East in pursuance of a plan to give the encampment to the West three suc- cessive Dotroit in 1SSU. Topekc in ,uid Chicago in Tho roll was caiic 1 and California presented the niTne of Colonel Smedberg, a retired oScer of the regular army, for Com- mand'T-m-Chicf. Connecticut named Colonel Wheeler C. Voasoy, of Vermont. Indiana and Ohio named General Al- Tin P. Ilovey, of Indiana, whilo Mon- tana supported Smedberg. Minnesota. New TlaTVipshire, New Jersey, Idaho and Iowa expressed a preference for Colonel Pennsylvania, Rhode Island. Tennessee and Texas named Colom-; veasey. Utah, Virginia and Alaska wanted Colonel Smcdborar. and Illinoi? the last Starts to respond for Veasey. As soon as the roll call ended, Colone: S.tnedberg ascended the platform and withdrew his naaae. General Hovey pur suing a similar course. This action was Pectod -Aith applause, and by a unani- mous vote Colonel Veasey was electee Cominander-in-Chief. __ Next in order was the selection of i ben-.or Vice ComznandcMn-Chief and ii Wing- considered that the office bo- longed to the matter was the delegates from that State a lonr conference the name o) F. Tobin was presented as Waniaious choice. Mr." Tobin accepted Position. -George P. Creamer, o: bill now pending in Congress. Mrs. Alger was introduced and acknowledged the greeting of the encampment. A vote of thanks was given Mrs. Alger foi co-operating with her husband In aidina the AV. It C. work. Mrs. Livermor" was then introduced, after which the distinguished party left the hall. After Mrs. Witteinpyer had finished her ad- dress, committees on reports, resolu- tions and courtesies were appointed and a recess was taken. DONE UP THE BANKS. A Kentucky Lumber Merchant Dl After Having lxnur.il Forged Paper Auiotuitinjr to Over CHICAHO, Aug. sudden disap- pearance of W. Hume Clay, tho Ken- tucky lumber merchant, from Chicago i Dn August 11. without leaving a trace of his whereabouts, is explained by a dis- patch received from Louisville, Ky. It is said that Clay ha< forgt'd the name of his grand fa tin r, Matthew Hume, to a large amount of paper, and that he has -aught the Jlank of for the Clark County National I'.auk, of Winchester, for S-U.OOU and another bank in Winchester for t.50.000. Then it is said, to com] lute the iisiof .-.ucces.s- ful frauds, that a bank has suffered to the tune of Clay's lumber business has bc-en a good one ror 1 several years nnd no reason is known for hia action. ,TO BE A CARDINAL. then elected Jnnioi There were several put In nomination for the _____ of the Roman's Relief Corps opened e was yaj with buntinsr and dcc- oraer. President Mrs. Wittenmeyei _ ]o the midst of her address when Alsrer. Mrs. Jobs aad Logan, who If a member of tbfl pension committee of the W. ot Archbishop Kt-nrlok. of Hpllovpl to bp in the of .Succession tor Honor. ST. Aug. possible ele- vation of Archbishop of St. Louis, to a in the College of Cardin- als is the sole topic of conversation among Catholics here. Now that Car- dinal Newman is dead there are but two English Cardinals, ore a Canadian-Frenchman and an Irish- American in the person of Cardinal Gibbons. It is believed that Archbishop Kenrick will be appointed a Cardinal on the fiftieth anniversary of his consecra- tion as a Bishop, which soon occurs. It is claimed ih-it nothing tho Pope C'nild do would confer a gieater pleasure on the ten million Catholics of tho United States, as the Archbishnn is re'Tirdetl as the greatest churchman in America. Telegraph Operator-, Must Gamble. ST. Lons local man- agement of the We.-torn L'nion Tele- graph Company has compelled all its operators to sign an agreement not to Speculate in grain or provisions, or place their money on sporting events. Tho company takes the position that specu- lation by operators on information ob- tained whilo working the wiies is de- moralizing to them and tends to un- settle the confidence of patrons in tho security of the telegraph as a medium of confidential exchange between busi- ness men. Cap'nrf or :i Nntorlonn Thlwf. CincAr.o. Aug. Isaacs, a New York cloak thief, has been ar- rested here. He is believed to have se- cured worth of goods in that city before coming to Chicigo Tho officers have recovered a number of satchels from Isaacs which contain fine plush and silk cloaks valued at and ho is thought to still soxcial thousand dollars' worth of silks .inrl plushes con- cealed in this city. Ite was arrested at the instance of parties in New York whom he had swindled. "Washington ;i Hull Club. ST. Aug. prospect of the Brooklyn Association team finish- ing its season in Washington, C., is very brilliant at present. There is now no club at Washington, and it is the be- lief of both the P.rooklyn manager and players and Association that the club -would bo bettor there than on then home grounds. 1'n sulent 1'helps, of the Association, has expressed his opinion about the legality and financial advan- tage of the move and considers it a first class one. The New York Central Strike la Still Oil. Reported That the Firemen Have Been Ordered Out. _ The Sido of the Story. Aug. This week's Journal of tho Knights of Labor con- tains an editorial on the New York Cen- tral strike, accusing Vice President "Webb of having systematically pro- voked tho strike by his overbearing, haughty and arbitrary treatment of em- ployes. The editorial says Webb's first elfort is to de-troy tlr- Knights of Labor as an organization, after which ho will direct bis attention to tho engineers and firemen's fight Iti Convention. 3. C., Ang. Tho F.e- publican nominating convention yester- day in the Seventh Congressional dis- trict was a complete fiasco. The dele- gates fought and cursed each othor in public and private. Tho convention baa bopn in session two days without result. Braytoa and Miller arc two candi- dates. The chances are that a dark horse will capture too prize. and Order Azuln CLorQVET, 3fmn., Aug. 14. K. Second rerimcnt. Wednes- day. Criminal warrant? were sworn out twenty-seven strikers and a number of tneai bare been j Tho strikers thoroughly cowed law and order atrain prevail. Work is I partially resumed and fuil crews ba i at work to-day. Trip on Rcconf. NEW Yonx. Tho Wh-te Sur steamship Tectonic arrived here Wed- nesday from Qaeonsiowa after of Svc days, nineteen hours and fire minutes, the one on record. Tho City of New York, of the Inmar. line, with -which the Teutonic was racing, came in hours later. A Fool Etc, Fannaa is here dring frora the effects of pro- lotged debauch. A sLort ago ho same into possession of and at woe opon career of dissipa- tion. He squandered his wildly, M   not send mora freight e.ist is that tho yard at Do'.Vitt is and do not want to put too much on their h.uuUi. When they got the UeWitt yard cleared of freight evorything will go on as of old." AI-UAXV, N. Y., Aug. news of the breaking of the strike sent ous from New York received a knock in tho head at noon yesterday, when tho switchmen and brakomon of tho Dela- ware railroad went out on a strike. AU branches of the road aro tied up. The P. Sz II. is tho only route north of thu Shore and Pennsylva- nia roads, aucl this practically ci communication with Canada and North- ern New York. The mon worn ordered to strike because tur- rorvl took freight and cars belonging to tho Central up to Troy and transfcrri-1 thorn to tho Troy Schenectady branch of tho New York Central. The Central road, which was to have moved a larore number of freight tranii at Wcfit Albany yosuirday, moved just one, and that consisted of only thirty-five cars. It will be seen that this is but a petty movo when it known that on an average 10U freight trains a day. each consisting of about fifty cars, are moved. The road suc- ceeded in closing the draw of the freight bridge last evening and one train waa drawn from the approach. About fiitv train hands from the Michigan Central railroad have arrived here and will as- sist in raiding the blockade. The rr.ihoarl official's have evidently received a in the strike on tho Delaware Hudson road. Tho largo freight bouse of that road is deserted and the depot presents tho appearance of Sunday. The importance of move must not be underestimated. The road from Albany north of Saratoga, Montreal and other points, as woll as to Vermont, is used by tho West Shore, New York Central and Pennsylvania roads. All of these aro, therefore, af- fected by tho strike. Tbo Albany and Fitchburg roads are in danger, but thoy will probably stop handling New York Central freight. Last night John Rood, of East Al- bany, who is secretary of the local Brotherhood of Firomon, told a press representative that all tho firemen from New York to Buffalo on freight engino-i were out and would leave their engines at once. The Shore fire- men are to follow, which will leave tho engineers valueless to the roads, as they will not run with green fireiaon. The order was received yesterday afternoon by tfl'-prnph from Chief Sargont at Cleveland. Old heads here say that one of two things must hapnen either the strike will become prodigioul or it will die. The first afTray of the srriko occurred at West Albany last night. The ass-jr- tion bad been frequently made that i( tho Pinkcrton men attempted to the freight they would be stoned. detective wro evidently scared, for when 3 crowd of '-nectators gathered on th" hridce tfley d'-termined to i; before they started a freight train. Ac- cordingly they moved uo towards the crowd. Tr.f :r orders were no: and in an instant the feli'.vcs Vegan" io use their clubs. The rotaliavi and when the city police cleared bridge two Piakerioa men -were found badly hurt z.r.-l one spectator had a frac- tured The city police that the PinkertOTi :nea had no business to rout the crowd- A Fire. Pa.. Aug. 14 yester- day at Clinton. X. J.. destroyed a factory, a marble works and an overall and shirt factory and damaged a resi- dence. The depot of the Lehigb toilet Railroad Coanpany was saved witb difi- csity. Loss, Arties, Aug. The clal wklcb into be issaod by the will show that wblis Colnaa was to ttomrt kte WK.VSGH.VO POLITICIANS. Wild HI tue Sooth Dem- ocratic klral FmctloM War. COLUMBIA, S. C., Aujf. Tho Dem- ocratic State convention assembled here yesterday. Tho committee on creden- tials made its report on the contesting delegations from Fairfield. An ani- mated debate arose upon tho report, which was at timos characterized by groat bitterness between the opposing factions. In tho course of the discus- sion T. W. Woodward (straight-out) gave the lio to Dr. Popo A scene of wild confusion followed. Delegates jumped upon their chairs. gesticulating A personal col- lision upon the floor was averted only by the coolness of Delegate llaskell, who appealed to the convention to como to order. His appeal fit-ally hal tne do- sired effect and tho debate proceeded. Finally the convention seated the Till- manites. COXTiSST (i VM ES. Settle an Association Sonic IMiputvil LOVISVII.I.K, Ky., 14. American Association directors com- pleted their work Wednesday afternoon and adjourned. Tho Syracuse- Louisville gamo was awarded to Syra- cuse. The contested game between the Brooklyn and St. Louis clubs in which tho umpire gave the cramo to St. Louis. was given to Brooklyn. Tho contested Toledo-Athletic game was given to tho Athletics by a score of 5 to 3. Tho trans- fer of the Brooklyn games to Louisville and St. Louis was affirmed. Tbe trans- fer of the Brooklyn games in the early part of tne season to Philadelphia was found to be unauthorized, but as tho majority of tho games were won by Brooklyn they wore allowed to stand. The services of Cartwright, in dispute between .St. Louis and Rochester, were given to St. Louis. -US NEST. Advcrtihinic n Theater by Crooked Work In tlio Sule of Tickrts. CHICAGO, Aug. Beaumont, advertising agent for tho Chicago Opera tlouse, was arrested yostonlay on a charge of embezzlement. JSeaumonthad charge of the distributing of 500 tickets weekly for advertising purposes, and it is alloircd tba'o he disposed of a number of them at a reduced price and not for the purpose intended. Nearly all the prominent theatrical agents of the city are said to be involved in the robbery, Beaumont being at the head of a pool formed to dispose of the tickets of other theaters, as woll as those of the opera house. Although receiving but a mod- erate salary, Beaumont has been en- abled, sinco bis connection with tbe theater during tho past fivo years, to amass a fortune of 550.000 California Kopulillotn Convention. SACRAMENTO, Cal., Re- publican State convention yesterday adopted tho report of the committee on organization making tho temporary of- ficers permanent. The platform was then read and adopted. It commends tho administration of President Harri- bon, as well' as the course pursued by Secretary Blaino in the Bohring Sea negotiations. Pension legislation, tho Eight-Hour law and stringent laws against pools and trusts are all urged. Tho passage of the Silver bill is ap- proved, and an iwircase of the currency of tbe country to tho extent demanded by its business is recommended. Honry S. Markham was nominated for Gover- nor. Another U'ar imminent. S U.VAIIOH, Aug. with Honduras now appears to be inevitable. Tho actions of President Bogran, of Honduras, havo not been satisfactory to President of Salvador, and ho is irritated beyond measure. Ezeta is watching the situation closely and may take summary action at any time. In the meantime Bogran is kept busy watching affairs in his own territory. Several revolutions are said to be in progress in Honduras, although Bogran claims that he has routed all malcon- tents and that his country is at peace. The Won. N. Y., Aug. races here yesterday were uninterest- ing. There were three events and the favorites won easily in each caso. The attendance was about 4.000. In the class, trotting, purse S3.000, divided, Mambrino Maid won first money. Al mont Wilkes took three straight heats in the race, purse Tho free for all pace in a victory tut Adonis._______________ Craft In Common. STC. MARIE, Micb.. A serious collision occurred morning on Lake George botwr-c-n t steamer Dcrereaux and the schoonei Mitchell, of Folsoin's tow. upbound. Both vessels were very badly damaged. Cr.rrET.AXTi. O.. Aug. Repub- lican Congressional convention of Twentieth district y'terday and several ballots takes without showjs? any material Aay. 14. noyicO' has been laid at rest. Since Tuesday bis remains laid an state ia St. Mary's church, and yesterday morn- ing, after the solemn bad been per- formed, the body VM deposited ia Cal- rary Gemfetery. mtarsl bfew owt   death as the result of the rite of circumcision practiced upon it. 'The operator is said to bo a Ru.-sian Jew. Tho parents are young pooplc, aud the "hlld their first born their ignorance, and re- lying on thd assurances of the operator, they woro of the fact that their babtt was slowly bleeding to death until too late. The babo died three hours afu-r rlie operation and as a phy- reached its cradle. Alt no v, 0., Aug. Horace A. Tick- nor, of MiijTiulorp. has brought for S50.000 flamngps aurainst tho fjako Town- ship Mutunl Insurance Company and its ofricors. Ticknor's house burned, and the Inaurtinrc company had him arrested on the charp-e of incendiarism. On ex- amination nt.Kavonna he was discharged, and afterward fcho grand jury failed to Indict. The plaintiff is represented by several of tbo ablest lawyers in this fcection. and tho company will make it tight. A Hoy's Kf-mnrkaMo "Le'ip. CI.BVKLAXP, Aug. 14. Frank Micliss, aged fourteen years, had an experience Wednesday that nearly cost him his life. Ho hnd got about in thn middle of the Nickel Plato trestle, near Kinsman Street, when a train came dashing to- word him. It was Sure death bonoath the wheels or a jump of seventy foot to the ground. Frank jumped. IJis waa sprained 5nd bo was cut on the head somewhat, but, unless there aro in- ternal injuries he will soon be about. for Criminal YOUNOSTOTTS, Atig. Joseph Jod- ings, an Italian who claims his homo is in Pittsburgh, hns been jailed, charged with attempting criminal assault upon Hannah Stoinor, aged eight years. Jod- ings was soon giving the girt some pen- nies, and when ho attempted tho waa frightened away by a la.lv and soon after arrested. The- accused denies the charge, and states that ho came hero from Pittsburgh in search of employ- ment. lie was held for a hearing. (in me TTartlenn CoT.irMnr's, 0., Aug. The State Fish and Game Commission appointed tho following fish and gamo wardens: C. TI. Marshall, of St. M.u-y's, for tno Mercor County reservoir; AV. M. Har- low, of Fnirfleld County, for tbe Lick- Ing reservoir, and Mr. Wilbur, of San- duslcy County, special warden for Lake Erie. _ Killed ninmcir With Hovolvnr. BL-VXCinCSTHR, 0., Aug. J. M. Casto. a soldier of tbe late war and mem- ber of the 0. A. H., suicided Tuesday by himself in the right tctnplo with a revolver. Ho bad boon afflicted with paralysis for several years past and, being totally disabled, ho received a pennlon of 572 per month. LIMA. Ang. Rose Eminger, wife of John Eminger, a brewery em- ploye, has been missing from her home dace Friday evening. She left her during tho absence of her bnsbftTid at work and eloped with Frank Mlllor, a sinjrlo -man. It is thought aonple are in Fostoria. Alt Attorney O., Anp. Samuel II. Heard, years of an attorney redding at this place, deliborato ly threw liimself in front of a train near the pot and was instantly killed. the death of a son and ftnan- difflriitiow are supposed to have un- bis g-.ind. Mr. Tno thirty- first annual jratborinr of the Ohio Meeting Association is in progress at Camp Lychar. north of this city, and will continue for a period of ten largest corps of ir. the of ibf aMociation has been for this year. WItti Aof. A constable on Tuesday F. who with ?433 of Hie of AdiTDS Express Coai- pany white acting afent of coot- waived O., Aug. 14. a well-kMOwa dry foods clerk, tooooanit aiirlil iMtdMMin, bat failed. of the of Two by I CollUlon in YOKK, Ang. of the wreck of tho British steamship Para- metta have reached this ciiy. The ves- sel sailed from Melbourne, Australia, homeward bound, on July -JO. On seventh night out she into col- lision with tho bark Ethel Mary, o! Milford Ilnvon. Tho latter was out entirely in twain and sank short- ly after tho accident. Her crow wore saved. The steamship was also badly damaged by tho collision and began leaking so freely that it was impossible to keeu her After ten days' hard work at the pumps, during which time signals of distress were constantly and when tho passengers wore all about to desert tho ship. -liip An- boy hove in o'i .ill hands but Captain Unii.rl.iis .uid oficers. These ivlusoil to ire the ship and remained on board tho wreck for tnroo day-.. Tlicv werc< linaliy coni- pellel .l.-s-rt the amla't--; A perilvvis four days' voy iif1 i.i a sma.l boat they uy 'ivtlie ship Avoiiilalo -uid will landed at Dune- din, Mow A al.uid. Turltl' llfii-iro st II Mem it In Uhllo tint Moii-i.- AV 11 The House p ;i nutlioi .'i ,u- i-silo ol certain In-i.H the piMeeoiU to be ifru.iroit 10 Iba ui !vi o.i'i. tbo nf 1'ir M.N- nir. nvvi .it 'V. Clmrles, M.I. Tin- v.ufL' .111 l.'ortlUca. ticns liiil ,i :i -i- to On nil f "iirt tu up the MolC.iv ci li li, no ijuor in o call of tin- mini .im! 'u.-fjua til wlic ;ui SKXArr-Tlie '1 td th Mouse anirmlnu in? in th- i.i'iui- 1 -iici t'llij. A resolution agri't-il lo, the Secre- tary of 'he 10 i In- cjuut'Tfrit Ri.imi.iiin' of btcel ill '.In' I'ittr, buivli. Tin- rcsolrti'-ns r. '.-imils. Hlnii Qu.iyiei.utQi: to nrdor of im uu'ssi imJ llmll of iluluio n-'erroil tn '.Uu1 Uumiiilltou on UiiiC" Mr Hoti" o'T'T" 1 :m uincncl- mont to IneluiU- th" lull HI onlorol' busines1- pniposi'ill.y Mr Ph.' joint res- olution to 'jxtcnil current to An- Kiisl'J'.l p.iavj 1. n o tlie timlf und tho n t wus discuss. 
                            

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