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Salem Daily News: Friday, August 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - August 8, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               FHE SALEM DAILY NEWS. i i i ___ ____________ II. NO. 186. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY AUGUST 8. 1890. IT WAS BARBAROUS. In the Penl- iry at Boston. a General Attempt to t are Held at Bay Prison Guards. rlsoners are he Scene of the uient. ireneral riot oc- at the State prison and cV-iion are on tbe scene, The trouble is >f the dith'culties attend- iforcementof the Bertil- and photo- risonc-rs. aggravated by escape of "Chicken" ure and subsequent pun- ornoon there was a gen- in the workshops. The ooi'y tiie orders of thuir eiu -n to their cells. A iclice was summoned to in? the prisoners to their Iroady in theircells add- irhuncc by smashing the irisoaers were especially north and south wings, k tbe streets. Several veroassaulted by the con- rely injured. Three or re MI the hospital with received while he "strike" was precon. to have taken place at as postponed. "Cnicken" 'igleadcr. the prisone-s marched ;hops very quietly, but f enterod when a terrific 11 bro'.co out. Windows ere broken and the men TO yard and the entire >r the various walls. The fired, at first to ter- but as several nearly D' tho wull the bullets kill. It however, nobody was seriously o'ricC'f; with clubs and rs held the prisoners at n Every m the Hoston police force ison. and fully 300 oifi- d in tbe yard and corri- ird on the bus bee a are armed with Win- fid hare instructions to no attempts to scale the it has yet been taken of ut it is many have ed to their cells. Some iown to be hiding in tbe cshops and it is thought have succeeded in iuter world. Cordons of e streets loading to the general ij'iblic, includ- re excluded. las seventy men locked They bo kept on r until they express their obey the rules of the r confusion in the fire was started by some but was-quickly extin- thousiht that tbe plan of ns to start a fire and in t. when tne outer gates .o admit the fire depp.rt- for liberty. Why Tivr> Chocks Were End 'vntiiiiler-M Curcer. i'-, Aug. subject s to orcite tbe greatest lection with the Kemm- the rucord of the volt- k which killed him. It rally supposed that tbo 1.300 volts and the sec- iOO and 2.000. Electrician as in the dynamo room, time was the voltage 3 and that it fell fre- of Kemmler still lie in Drison where the au- id Wednesday. Warden t decided where the re- nallv buried. r- Trensch, a y years of and stip- pocketbook vender, who in Randolph street, f heart disease yesterday after he Opened up his The attendants at astonished when pre- for burial to find sews 'thing tbo sura of over to the house in which Aug. Tbe ?500.- nal Institute to be ted undor the will Tj> (Albert, million- )piat. is to be of an The will proridcs .holic snail be edu- in any capacity in j :vat all person-; or shall :r Kacic Glass r-'.T-.v -ade ar: assign- of crfditors. Tho s.vxfioo: assc-ts as en- f on-amental No cause ia Censias a roTjjb count of Chicago. It shows '-o be 1.093.575, an ia- iif or 18 per Chicago Untied Inch la the of Opinion Et- by Leadiuf Metropolitan Jour- ;he Kaniniler Execution. YOKK, Aug Coaimentir.j on the execution oi Kemmlcr at Auburn the Sun says editorially: "The firstduty of the next Legislature will Lo to ro- peal the electrical execution law and to restore the old method of aum mistering' the death sentence hj- Scien- tific curiosity has boon gratified ciently by this one awful experiment. The Press says: "It will not inend matters at all to say that there was ig- norant bunirlinjr on the part oi the exe- cutioners: that the- first current v. .1? m t kept on long- or tlif last ciirront too long-. It uas argued in behalf of this mode of execution that death was to be instantaneous, lightninjj-hko, painless, and that the rcaudlin worship atte-ndinjj the dramatic of the nervy murdr-ror to the scalfold was to be done away with, and a secret and mysterious taking off, devoid of sensational to be substituted. The act -went so foolishly far as to pro- hibit the newspapers from publishing the dff.ails of such an a pro- hibition which, by the way, they most properly and complrt'jh ignored. Tho age of burninir at the stako is past: tho ape of burning at the wire will also pass." The World says: "The first experi- ment in electric execution should be the last. Tts results stror.g-ly condemn this tnetbod of Duttinfr criminals to death as very cruel and shocking-. The effect upon the v> as sickening. The effect upon the public is stiil more shocking-. The electric execution law ousrht now be repealed. So long- as it stands, convictions fur capital offenses will be difficult to the point of impossi- bility. Juries will not willingly con- demn mon to death by torture." Wednesday's CY- perynent was a failure, it does not show that this mode of inflictinjr tho death penalty is not a success. The failure was due not to th" system, but the buntr- ling and inefficient way in which the execution was managed. fault was with tho doctors and the electricians. The bung-linp work does not prove that execution by electricity is a failure. It does not warrant a rctuin to the barbar- ity of the fallows. Had the execution been properly and efficiently managed it would have proved tho success of the new system beyond all dispute." L'ncxprot etl Opposition to Vanre. CiiAizi.oTn-., S. C. Aug. The war- fare of the Farmers' Alliance and the Richmond railioad against Senator VanCC gt-Owc apaao a.rttl ic citing much interest. It has been sup- posed by out-ide o? the Alli- ance, that that organization, having named seven out of nine Congressional nominees, no formidable attempt would be made to defeat the Senator. It ap- pears, however, that the farmers will determinedly oppose Mr. Vance because of his stand on the Sub-Treasury bill. An Anjrplic Story tlmt Won't RnrKFOun, 111., Aug. George Sweinfurth, in an interview, has ad- mitted that several children had been born at the AVoldon Ifraven to angel" who are without husbands, and with unblushing effrontery laid their parent- age to tho Holy Ghost. Ue retaliates on Mrs. Kinnehan. who left his place Mon- day and. made the shocking disclosures that have been given publicity, by sav- ing that she had admitted to him bet repeated violation of her marriage vows. Mny he Counted Out. LAKE, Utah, Aug. The Lib- erals have carried Salt Lake County with the exception of sheriff and recorder, and through irregularities in the Mormon precincts they may be counted out, as their majorities are very small. The Liberals carried Salt Lake, Uox Elder, Summit and Weber counties, which are in fact the Territory, as they contain four-fifths of the population, Opponent for ConproM. DATfvri.T.r., Til., Aug. The Pro- hibitionists. Farmers' Mutual Uonefit As- sociation, grangers, coal miners. Knights of Labor and every one else who was dissatisfied with the Democratic and Republican parties hold a union Con- gressional convention in this city Wed- nesday' which resulted in the nomina- tion of Colonel Jesse Harper for Con- gress to run against Congressman Can- non. Iron TTorks Sold to n Syndicate. Bi-ooMiNf.rox. 111., Aug. 8. Mr. M. T. Scott, of tiiis city, a syndicate of English capitalists have purchased the Cumberland iron works, which com- prise acres of land in Stewart County. Tenn.. 20.000 of which are rich agricultural lands, and the remainder mineral iancK The has a capital stock of 31.250.00J. Catholic Total Abstinence Union Meets at Pittsburgh. Motion to Iisert Temperance ill Parochial School Books Raises a Row. Tumolt Caujed by the of a Priest Who Saiil That the Siiloon Not Go nnil tJiat Should be Foneht With Praypr and I Thursday's session of the Catholic Total Abstinence L niou of America reports of officers and comunttecs and the reading of pa- pers on various topics were heard. First Vice IVesiuVnt tnieedy's report em- braced the report from all subordinate unions, showing that the organization has a total of unions, with a mem- bership of in America. A motion to insert temperance lessons in Catholin school books jjave rise to stormy scenes. Father McTiirho objected, statin? that The church 1 the move- ment and declared that a glass of wine, beer or ale will injure no one. Groans and hisses greeted tbe remarks and the convention was in a tumult. Thecliair- man ruled Father McTiuhe out of order. That gentleman was not to be squelched and again took the floor, sayintr: "The insertion of temperance lessons in school books would turn from the church all German Catholics, who uphold tho church, but want their beer." Father McTighe was again called to order. An excited Boston deleg-ate who attacked the chair was compelled to apologize. The committee on resolu- tions reported, urging legislation in the interest of total abstinence by all of the States in the Union, recommended the establishment of total abstinence socie- ties in every church parish for the ben- efit of children: urges the publica- tion in school books of selections from the utterances of some of the leaders of the Total Abstinence Union. The reso- lutions were adopted. A motion to re- fer the school book question to tho gen- eral council cause 1 a repetition of tho turbulent scenes, Father McTighe mak- ing vigorous objection with pointed re- marks. He was repeatedly hissed and created a perfect Bedlam by saying: "The saloon can not and must not go. Let us direct our efforts in new channels and tisrht intemperance by prayers and fasting." Father Sheedy, tho author of the dis- turbing question, demanded that Father McTiffhe withdraw his remarks. Father McT'.gbe demanded tuia.u a. ii'inuto uu made of his protest and left the hall. The motion was adopted. Right Rev. Bishop Cottar, of Wiscon- sin, was elected president; Father Sheedy, of Pittsburgh, first vice presi- dent, and Father Manning, of Cleveland, O., second vice president: Father Mc- Mahon, of Cleveland, 0., treasurer; P. A. Nolan, of Philadelphia, secretary. Washington, IX C, was selected as tho next place for the convention and tho union adjouined Converse Hit Story. CoLfMUL'-i, O.. Aug. 8. ISx-Congress- man Converse gave out last night for publication his statement about the Governor Campbell-Lodgo bill embrog- lio. Ue says that young Allen W. Thurman did tell him that Governor Campbell had told him (Thurman) that he (Campbell) intended in his protest mooting speech to say thai if the Lodge bill passed and its enforcement was at- tempted in Ohio, he (Campbell) would call out the militia to prevent its exe- cution. An issue of veracity is thus raised between Converse and Thurraan. Rejoiclnp: Over thr Rj-crimc. BITEXOS Aug. 3. Telegrams of congratulation over the peaceful set- tlement of the disturbed condition of affairs are arriving from all parts of tho republic, and the people are aroused to a high pitch of enthusiasm. President Polligrini delivered an address to tho people In which be said the motto of the new p-overnment would be justice and liberty. The force which the exec- utive and the government will depend upon for their defense is public opinion. The address received with deafen- ing cheers. _ Confrrrnrr. of nn-1 KKW YOHK. Aug. S. The exocutivo committ'-e of the national conference of and corrections met yesterday at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. Indianapo- lis was selected as the place and May -J- to 25, Iy01. Hit; time for the meeting of the next conference. Among the sub- to considered by tbe conference are immigration, treatment and care of tho charity organizations, the chi'.d probK-ni in cities and ryjnjil sys- tems. _ OX. Ky.. s- night Wi'.iiam IIich.irJ.-on ar.J Wniiy.tn Jackson Torn Irvine pis- tols. Irvine returned :hf fire and desperate fisrht ensu'd. F.-Xnar-ls wp.? instantly kil'.-d. baciy -R-o-ir.d'-.i. and a bystander. William rr.or- tailj sboi. Ir-inc injury. All arc colore-i- a ip. Franklar.d. of the school bureau, presented bis final a-d corrcct'-I cc-r.sus repon to of Tiesdav cver.i-r. According to it tbe population of Cnicaco is or more than Superintendent Gil- bert has found in thecitj. Wis., big paper one of the model strawboard of tbe coantry. owned by tbc Jte'.oit Strawboard Cotcpany, was almost entire- ly by fire Wednesday Tba lowisestimawd coverod bj X IL. Aug. tho 1-f'Ot and Shoe Workers' t'nion fora restoration of or cent- c'.t tbe factory H. Son has been i ir. strikers, tho tV- wnrf'3 restored, a union ar.d the reference of f-i- v> the goaorai board oi the Behind TTim. CITT. -7. Mar- tin, or.e of the rnen of thU -lioi at his bom's here ye-terday a Sfty-clno of age and ba-i lived in t-T -ear-. lie was rep_t  per tou. Mr. Vane ''s amouil ment was 17, nuya strict party vote. The vroo or steel, im- po-in_' fro.n one vent per pound to tliree T-ntlis pt-r duivoo the hijrh-.-st cl'iss to be forty ti-.e per C'-ut. ail valorem. rvuehed Mr. after nn arcn men; coatrovrtir-; the protectio-.'stVlnim thut IO-A- are th.> re-suit of innff moved to reduce tho various rales in the l> i A b'r.iph Ui p r cent art reje.-tcd. next n duty o." 8 3 lOc perp'ni'd on iron and sleel Me mov d to amend by m.i ;iuy the rate reent nay  at dinner, the ifaiovcs forcing a second story-window and cciping. Mrs. Knowiton places her loss 5S.OOO. every bit of jewe'.rv. --vatcbes. necklaces, pins and hair- pins. except what was upon fier clea-ei out. Another robbery, aTnounting to said to oc- curred night, but particu- lars not if-arned- "Wisconsin train boand tar tbe frmT en-iarr.pTaent at Boston will Milwaukee this will in Boston noon Sunday. Keovfh have already swcorwl td fill icore tbaa ocwcbet. A Borrow. Aug. S. In the States District Court a Iibc-1 was Sled the .T. .T. Ciark. of which was for smuggling a. carjroof port frorr. St. Pierre. Ix-ing saroe which Jast month ia tbe ware- house of Wiliiair. II. Jordan. terlter FKAXKFOKT. Ind., Anf. 9. Ewly njoming a boiler in Jacobj's sawmill at Mclbcrrj killing engineer Will Sbc-sinaker injuring John Jacobj. Allen 4acoby, Mont Rhodes and twocUMren of THOUSANDS IX LESE. of Odd Kcllows Chlcftpo Iiupon'iiir UcntoiMtrutlun. CHICAGO, Aug. Thursday was the great day of tho Patriarchs" Militant celebration. All the patriarchs, the military organizations of the city and thousands of tho of tho triple link united in a grand -lomonstration In tho morning tbe competition be tvvecn subordinate lodges wai continued at Battery D. In the afternoon tho tri- ennial inswction of the patriarchs took place in Lake Front, Park. About mon wore in line and m.ule a gorgeous display. Owing to the dense crowds and evident mismanagement on the part of tho officials, tho big parruio did not get started until oVlook and it was about five when the head of the proces- sion passed the grand Mniul. I rand Sire Underwood in all tnt> >pieiulor of his Generalissimo's unifor'.'i was at the head of tho column, surrounded by his of aides in costumes equally gorge- His special escort consisted of the Hoston Hussars. Junia Hussars and Den- ver Lancors. On the; reviewing stand at Lako Front Park were gathered the ihnnitarios of the Stute anil city, :is well as of the 1. O O. F. Nearly also oc- cupied soats in the auipbitlieator, nnd thousands crowded the and streets, windows, balconies and roofs along Michigan avenue. Tiiero were so many breaks in the line that the review lastnd for over two hours. L-ist night tho third degree of chivalry was conferred on the lake front; there were display formations Jiy all the cantons; exhibi- tion drilling by tho Chicago Zouaves, and tho evening's entertainment con- cluded by a grand display of fireworks. THE SUBSTITUTE For the Kli-ctlon How II Klir.TH fr.MU tlie .M.ms- ure. .x. Aug. Mr. Hoar, from tho Committee on Privileges and Elec- tions, yesterday reported to the Senate a substitute for the Fcder.il Election bill, which passed the House last month. The substitute varies from the Lodge bill in some important particulars, as follows: Tho army at the pulls suction of tho Lodce bill, or r.ither that section which in effect incorporates the arnu at the is omitted from tno Senate bill. Tho of election of members for Congress issued by the 6 la to boards of convassors, which under tho House bill are to be accepted by tho clerk of tho Houso. under the Senate may ho contested and are subiect to inal adjudication before the United States Circuit Court judges. The house the Senate committee bill ,irvl United States marshals arc permuted to select juries. The amended bill does not meet with the approval of all Ucioubliwin members of the committep, several of them being dissatisfied with some fea turos of it. They hope, though, to se- cure still further modifications before the measure is put upon its i'lndl pas- sage in the Senate. Democratic mem- of the committee there aru no radical dillorenco-> between the House bill and the substitute reported, and that either would produce iniquitous re- sults. WEST UP IX A F'lie Hiitol I'uiiiu strove'l Lois JAPK.SOXVIM.E, Fla., Aug. Murray Hall, an elegant summer hotel at Pablo Beach, burned to tho ground early Thursday morning. The hotel was of wood, four stories high, with numerous towers, turrets and gables, and the flames made quick work of it. There wore fifty guests in the hotel at tho time, but tbe warning was sufficient to enable them to escape in good time with their effects. Fire was also communi- cated to the Beach Pavillion, a prome- nade dance hall, and the depot of the Jacksonville Atlantic railroad, which were entirely consumed. Murray Hall was built in and was tne property of John 0. Christopher, of this city, and was valued at Coristopher'.s loss, including furniture, is about 000. He had only ?40.000 insurance. Con crewmen VVunt m Vocation. WAHHIXOTON, Aug. 8. About 150 members of the and Democrats about evenly divided, nave united in a request to the Committee on Rules to report a resolution providing for a recess of the House from Saturday of this week until Friday of next week. Many members desire to attend tbe G. A. R. meeting in Hoston next week, while others arc an.xiou-> to go on I if town for a few days' r'st. Leading Re- publicans, including tbe Speaker, art- opposed to the proposition, so it ia doubtful -Ah'-thor it will carry. In Conrrntlon. ATLANTA. r'a-. Aug. The Statt ronrenlion met Hon. J. W. Northern -.vas nominated for Cfov-rnor by a and rising vote. Phil Cook was renomi- for of State: W. A. Wright for and R. H. Ifardeican for T- nrer. was TWO CENTS. Kcws (.'ollccfrd From All Over Ohio. Tlt.VIXS WKKCKED. CollUltui on the lev Kesatti In Itam.iKf to ri.AMi, S. Two freight trains came together with .1 terrific crash Thursday morning on M.C Valley railro-.id about ten miles from tbo city and two miles from Willow -union. The collision was 1 otwi-eu -No. -J'i. and the second section of No. .1. soutti- ward bound. O.MIT? to track at Willow :n.l al'.i-v No. -in to pass. Xo. li.id to pti'.s No 21 at Willow, h.ixini? t..i- oi to the main truck. Ii, -o m.ii cnr- ried out as undor'-Kiod. tin- !.i-t section of 21  t iv Nul Nonwoon, 0., AUJJ. S.-An accident occurred here Wednesday evening tbo premises of Hinldomeiur by whicb three men will probably lose their lives. Contractor Espel, who was ut work otr the ch 11 roh adjaemit, was gr.inted the privilege of drawing all (lie water he wanted from "Itttrtilemeifr's well. The fact that it is feet in depth and Contain- forty-five of W3.i scouted bv one of the victims. Michael anil .loc Sebastian were drawn- into the discussioti uud tin- former wae- not willing to accept iho sLaeini nt thai' tho null wns so trap door on the six-foot plat- form over thu woll'ti moul'i. a match Kunzel dropjjed it toward tho wnter. b'lt, it wont out. "I smell gas'' remarked .Mr. Kf uut ha foolishly twisted a newpaper nnd son! it after the burnnd out iriuteh Jn an ins J, 11 ere is_ a 9_x n 1 os i o n u K_u n ml. Pruos, who were standing on the plat- form, wore blown into the air. All were horribly burned and bruised and it is doifbtful if any one of thorn recovers. Found Hi-mi in tin- VKi.AXO, Aug. body of a man wa-3 found in tho woods about hiilf a mile beyond Blue Rock Springs by a party of berry pickers. The man was about thirty-fivu years old, liva feet nine inches tall and w-'ighcd about pounds. Thero a bullet hole in his bead. The ,iod> had evidently lajn in the position the b-i ry pii-Kers found it for several il.iy.s. There wa-  exciting groat interest. of A rtr-r.ins. DKI.AWAKH, f'-. Aug. The twenty- fourth reunion of thf Fourth R'-gimeBt, O. V. I., was held in thi1. city Wednes- day. Sizty-thrc'- of surviving mem- bers of tbo ton different companies were present. This one of tho first ments to respond to tho rail at the bo- ginning of the war. A carnn fire warn bold at O. A. R. Hriii in the overling. .failed for WF.'-T O.. -..-Elijah a wretch. WM in jail bor" Wc-hx-sdny. Ho is-'barg'-d with a heinou1; that of '.rr.sring tho of a oM girl. Mingiit the raarks low breeding an-i di'-pipation, and is about as a. Convention. Ci.r.YKi.A'Vfi. Aog. Re Congressional convention of the tietb district met here and j forty-forcr ballots taken witboata j nomination boingmado. State Senator Taylor is in tho lead, with Judge Tib- bals. of Akron, aoios" I. four othtr candidates having from f to -40 each. .y, The HOUM on Reform in the Civil Scrv- ioe its of the work- ings of office Of the Civil .SerricB Commiwiom yesterday. Nothing portant was developed and the commit- tee adjourned until to-daj, ___ hr Ausr. waylaid Peter Strahn. of Akron, hers. Wednesday night. The victm wme. beaten and en; in a horrible manner. clalros thieves got ii !i< III ii i 4 5? v .4l l ill i." ii i i ;t s-i i'J   

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