Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: July 25, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Salem Daily News

Location: Salem, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - July 25, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. VOL. II. NO. 174. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY JULY 25. 1890. TWO CENTS. Hi lins of the r the Crew PUL.UT1AN ttEGATTA. Fast Yachts nn.l Brtw'iy Tar. ,i i'me Days Sport for sin Immecs. Crowd. DI-I.LIII, Minn., 1U Ferrule Fiirht With the Flames and Their Timely Rescue. j iy increase.i went off successfully. Theie uere four entries in tho morning yacht racp over a twenty-mil- course. The biren, of Du- i won the Nushka, of i White Bear, second, tho Undine Cim'ein i third and the Manitoii withdrew. The Lurline Boat Club, of Minneap- oils, were the winners of the postponed senior fours. The starting crews "were: Owushtanunsrs. of Ui.ir-d Lur- lines, of Minneapolis: of Winnipeg, and Minnc.-ot.i-s of -St.'1'aul. It was hotly contested, but the census 1 padders won in ton In the aftprnoon the MississinDi Val- ley Amateur Association ra-.-os wero re- sumed, the senior singes being a walk- over for John P. Corbet t. of the Iroquois Club, of Chicago. The senior doubles followed next and were won by the Minnesotas in Tho Cedar Rapids crew was distanced. There were four starters in the senior four-oared race- .he of Min- apolis; Minnncsows, St. Paul: Owash- tanongs, of Grand Rapids, and the Win- nipeg crew. The race was a spirited one and was finished in the order given. ELECTRIC Trouble In a New York Town Over MB At- tempt to 1'lnnt la front of a Cath- olic Church. SARATOGA, N. Y., July elec- tric war at Schuytervillo has ml ihcr- great rejoicing i out again after an armistice of the firp-1 c-i -ir.'d Six of j three weeks. Judge Tappan, of Pots- w-r. lowered and by dam, having granted a permanent in- clude .ill -w had bojn safe- j junction restraining the people of sferrcd to fho Ousttiv Oscar, Father parish from interfer- wore wicnessed by larcro- j Bill Now Before to Ke- oruwds. and everytuin? j duce Amount ol IkUlds ,fortunite Lnndat Dover, tod. aee ao KuthualiMtlo ptloii. ,1'ilv Thr> oil steamer I'-a-" a-.-Mi'd at yesterday c the pr uurelandud j. Tiu'V wtre irieou-d by a large sru'-r-'.t'T.s and fri'-nds and tho one. The stories of disaster wero hsiomd to. It appears that tho out it :nn o'clock on the night ITt'i It -ASS by a flre- -.tarou-itd bunker, who the alarm and the men rVn-tl 10 the ITV-C' and pumps, b-iiav, d .n ai o- li'i-ly boir. tie 'ip lpn.l Despite ifo-'.s tiit' 'l.i'iies fiercely fire loni'titiod to spread. Them :o iio MO i h.inee of escape and -ti'-t .vis j most (rlouuiy one. nf -h on board were suf- 11 :.n.'ir stdll-i. Numbers of wc.p terribly burned befora iir iun-. .i'il lushing overboard. o'ok'-K. whc'c tbe men were ne.ir- .ui'l the fire had complete on of thf st amor, the German ustav (Kc.ir bore down upon the Held to Secure Circulation is Favored the Comptroller of the Currency. the; -A.itched tho burning Egypt ion should have been eight boats Ejypi S i'n" of the crow say is by the fire and ie atundoiud. while othersclaitu e steamer n as two boats short. n suff' rod t.-rribly from siuoko, 1 overwork he-fore help airivei. re now being carod for in the lloiiic proceed to Lon- v. 'IL-'I tho Manhattan ap- 1 t.i fcnpt sii" saw the Gustav signals of distress. Tho irr'n takot. from tho Egypt on her decks with hardly snnd. aud the little WHS ;r.'un_' Tnc quickly HIT boats and transferred the 5 :o h'-r own decks Captain badly burned and his mm i injure 1. All the Egypt's ocak in praise of their ac- ations aid trestiient aboard tho tan. lin? to the oflicial statement in 0 the burning of The steamer, originated in bales of cotton 1 boilers. The fire soon dam- pumps so as to greatly impair infill ness. The Egypt was sin Land's End when the firo it. mrning of the Egypt is the ab- ttH-rap of conversation and com- i shippmcr circles, and all the us thpte seems to be a certain of itnstery attaching to the af- ie ropo-t of the captain of the with much interest. wml-iKi. which nas the first to snows of tho disaster, signalled mp-ssase frOm the Egypt's cap- he officers of tho Xation.il line, re of which has not yet trans- I'he board of trade is taking ex- steps to secure a searching uion into the circumstances of I 1 y i "MFirv. July a ttended meeting of the Mont- ndustrial and Commercial As- yesterday, resolutions were protesting against the Force resolution was also adopted l the association is opposed to no event lend aid to any looking to a boycott of North- in -July 2s._ Counsel for Rev. W. ns has brought suit against Sidney A. Wilber. Dr. Rufus R. "hie Campbell and Fred. J. Ta- 'corer damage, for an onspiracy to convict Downs of i ae evidence is of the most July grand rom the ships of tho of evolution rk 700 While practising an   badly The losses and ir.sur- burned Th-rsdaj were Hotoi Brown Some Statistics RegitrdiuK the Tlu-ir Cirvinacloii itlul Capital. WA-iuxf. July Sherman has laid before the Senate a letter from the Comptroller of the Currency in re- gard to the bill affecting Xationj.1 bauk circulation recently reported to the Senate. The Comptroller says: Thoro were, on the 17th of May last, ,-5.438 nonal banking associations in operation in tho United States, having a total capital of These associa- tions had a total circulation of 940, secured by United States bonds amounting to at their face value. The circulation stated does not include in of retire- ment and represented by an equal atuount of lawful money on deposit in tho treasury of the United States. It also appears that the minimum amount of bonds required to be deposited by these banks under existing law upon which they would be en- titled to maintain a circulation of It would therefore be possible for these banks to withdraw bonds to the amount of and surrender of their circulating notes under existing law. The bonds on deposit in excess of legal requirements are, as a rule, the property of the oldwr banks located in the Eastern and Middle States where current rates of interest are relatively low. Banks recently organized have, as a rule, the minimum deposit of bonds and this is in a sreneral sense trm- of all banks located in States and Territories where interest rates high. The first sec- tion of the bill reported from the Com- mittee on Finance on the loth inst with amendments provides that National banking associations may be organised and operated with a nominal deposit of bonds to .secure circulation. This pro- vision standing alonu would be favora- bly received by the banks It would, however, tend to a contraction of tho bank note circulation unless accom- panied bv the second section, which en- titles said associations to receive circu- lating notes equal In amount to the par value of the bonds pledged for their re- dorantion. Ths operation of tbe bill would" salutary. It would enable now banks to organize without forcing them to ap- pear in the bond market in competition with the Secretary of the Treasury, u his wo u Id result in an advantage to both the Government and the banks. Many banks located in the newer Statei, where the interest rates are high, would no doubt reduce the present amount of the bonds now held to secure their oir- culation, and thi would result in benefit to the banks and to the people whom they servo, as it would increase locally the amount of available for loans by putting in circulation the sums now locked up in bond premiums. In conclusion ime Comptroller says Congress seems to have determined that the turther issue of bank notes is not desirable, and in that event the bur- den of maintaining circulation, he should ba removed from these associations so that they may more sat- isfactorily serve the people as banks of discount and deposit, in which sphere they have never boon adversely criti- cised by anyjportion of the people. Hattle Between nnd Trainmen. GOPHEX, Ind., July night a vicious gang of tramps under- took to take possession of Lake Shore freight train No 4S. at Ligonier. A furious battle resulted between tlw trainmen and the tramps and in the me- lee brakeraan Frank Houk was shot twice by a tramp and is not expected to live. Conductor Rockwood was severely pounded about the head and breast The gang was finally repulsed and La-Ve Shore detectives sent after them, but no trace of them has been found. Attempt to liurn A Hotel. NKVC YOKK. July attempt was made Thursday bv an incen- diary to burn down the Grand Union Hotel- A boll boy discovered smoke Issuintr from tho air shaft on the -second floor. He found a bundle of ratrs on firo which bad been placed on the sill of the shaft. Th" flames were extinguished without alarm or damage. The hotel contained about 500 people and great loss ol life would undoubtedly have re- sulted had tbe fire not been discovered. A of F.-xUlltfeo. July 25.-Last evening an express train on the West Penn road struck a two-bom team and driver mt a crossing near Herr's station. Thi driver and V-am were tilled instaativ. A of laborers who -srere construct- in? a at the roadside s A Three-Story itrlck Dwelling Wrecked at Savannah, lia. Tliree Persons Killed and a Number Very Seriously Injured. The of the UtaMter The llurlcd Under Falling SAVA.VVAII, Ga., July M. J. Bui- lard's three-story brick boarding house, No. 205 Congress was blown up early Thursday morning. Three people were killed and six injured. There were twelve people in the house. Most of t e occupants were asleep and wero hurled from their beds and either buried under the falling debris or thrown on top of it. The namfs of t.bo killed art- Mrs. W. J. Bullard, James Lockly and Gus Robio. The names of the wounded are: John Roberts, fractured ankle and concussion of tho brain; L. J. Tate, con- tusion of face and chest; Moldon Key- wood, colored, shoulder broken; J. A. Rimes, Edward S. Everett and Mrs. Ed- ward S Everett, bruised; Sam King, badly injured about the body. George Maxwell, colored, has been cr- ested on suspicion. He had been em- ployed in the house, but had been dis- charged on Saturday night, when be swore that he would be revenged. Workmen were busy all day removing the debris, No signs of powder or dyn- amite have discovered. Mr. Billiard, who was sleeping with bis wife, had a marvelous escape and re- ceived but a few slighi bruises Mrs. Bullard was dead when taken out. She was fearfully crushed. The cause of tbe explosion is a mystery. There arft many rutnors of an ugly nature, but no- body will take the responsibility of mak- ing a direct statement. One man insin- uated that there had been a row in the bouso towards the end of a jollification in which the inmates bad been indulg- ing. Lamps wero used instead of gas and it is said that there was no meter in the house, though it was supplied with gas pipes throughout Most people therefore are una-lr> to see how tho ox- plosion could have bi-cn caused by gas. The falling building was a three-story tonnment. built in the French flat style and faced on tho south, the two top floors being used as sleeping apart- ments. The explosion blew the entire building to the northward, some of the furniture being blown across St. Julian street into spliatcrs, while the flying bricks went as far as Bay street, the en- tire structure collapsing outward on Con- gress street. th ttir t KxtrH .if u ol 'Iliitt for ixuKiKMi. Jnlv s an exciting time in tho House nc-day at the opening of tho specia of the Legislature. There wero 144 members present, seventy-six being Republicans. The Democratic minority attempted to prevent the organization of the House, but were ignored by Speaker Doolittle. In one Instance tho rote of a Democrat was counted by the Speaker, in spite of the declaration ol the member that he ha 1 not voted. Mr. Mahonoy created iji'.ito a broPZO by calling thp Speaker a liar. At ono time it looked ;is though the dispute would be settled in a pujriMstk- manner, but order was finally restored and tho Republicans elected of the House, who h.id boon previously agreed upon in caucus. A TOTAL WRECK. I.M44. Idaho and Will Vrovo an Antloontl i> Complcto aaces can not he stated yet ol at that they iet ar'- It is iron pipe. -Ta'i? Thsrs- s A Fmtevt frrrm July A at tbe Cbaaiber of bere jwvtrdaj wbicb A J.-TJ shot trriBj to of C aisbt. Jj ia tbe eiro-sf b to be sa o Secretary Tbe the against Xortbera propoted TVe CHf Cowaeii ttM WgrkTs Fair ftte te f in Tlwtaai fe M ft aftar tin Mr. Thoy Will EV-I.IB the Order. A-rrmsow, Kan., July the ex- press companies have notified their agents at Atchison and other points to take no more beer or other liquor for Kansas points. Heretofore local dealers on this and the other side of the river have done a bottle, ]ug and keg busi- ness by express to interior towns. In order to get around the order, dealers will pack their liquors in boxes and, thus concealed, express a -ents are bound to take them. The ordor was issued in anticipation of the original package bill becoming a law. BunkruptcT Hill Punned the Housn. WASUIXOTOX, July House spent Thursday wrangling over amend- ments to the Bankruptcy bill. Tho "voluntary bankruptcy" substitute was rejected (74 to and the Torroy bill with unimportant amendments passed. In tho Senate the Indian Appropriation bill was finally passed, most of the day being spent in the discussion of the question of denominational Indian schools. The tariff bill was laid before the Senate as tbe unfinished business. He Snrrcndoreil Hlmxelf. NEW YOHK. July arrest was made yesterday in tho case of Annio Goodwin, tbe victim of a malpractice at the hands of Dr. McOonigal. Andrew J. Fanning twenty-six years old, was no- tified that ho was wanted by the police and surrendered himself. He is the party to whom Annie wrote when she was ill asking him to call and see her. Ho did so and she got him to summon Dr. McGonigal to see her. Fanning held in baii. ArnlM Chnrirtrt With Mnrdnr. SYRACUSE, N. Y., July Two Arabs were arrested here yesterday on sus- picion of having been implicated in the murder of one of their countrymen, A. Hattog, at Vestal, Broome County, last week. The murdered man's head was horribly battered and then his body was forced under tho floor of a shanty. The men under arrest here answer the de- scription of thf) supposed tnurderfjrs- to tnrmttcAteo. WASHINGTON, July The Committee on Rules has agreed to report favorably the resolution introduced by r. Quo.. July advices from the steamer Idaho, of tho Dominion line, ashore at South Point, Anticosti, :irc to the effect that she will prove a total wreck. The ship made no water when she first struck, and it was thought that by the throwing over of a part of the carn-o she might be got off. Dispatches were consequently sent to Fox Bay, Heath Point, and South Point, Anticosti, for wrecking schooners. These vessels started at once for tho but as a heavy gale had spring up and as a very heaw sea is breaking on tbe steamer it is tho'icrht possi- ble tosave her. The Idaho was launched last fall and is of 40.000 tons burden. She sailed from this port Monday for Ayenmouth with a cargo of produce. Work for Ills Victory. MAHYSVII.I.B. Cal., July rounds were foucrht here Wednesday night by Petor Jackson, the Australian, and Tom Johnson, a heavyweight who has sotre reputation on tbo coast as a hard hitter. Johnson proved no match for the. Australian, but ho stood up Tna'i full v Hivl received heavy punishment urhour tluiclniiT. lie man- aged to make "I'etrr work as haid as in any fight he overbad Johnson got in a number of blows on Peter's ribs which evidently told on the Australian. Jack- son will sail for Australia Satutday. TJnel lirKropn Prtn CmcAoo, July Edwards, of No. Fourth Birdio Leo, of No. .17'J South Clnrk fouirht a duel Wednesday ni'.rhf, in front of Lizzie's pl.ioe of aboie. Fivo shots were exchanged and a portion of Birdie's chin was cirried .iway by a bullet. Both wore arrested. The fight was for tho love of a worthless follow who has Iwen dividing his attention be- tween them and taking money for his support from both. Bank I'Mfllril a Time WEEPING WATKK, Neb.. July Early yesterday morning three un- known men captured and bound and gagged tbe night watchman, took him to a grove about a half mile from town and tied him to a tree. They then re- turned to town, whore they broke into tho Commercial bank and drilled thoir way into the vault. They could not get into the time-lock safe, but secured in cash and postage stamps. S.-ulert. ASHI.AXH, July -J5 back- bone of tbe groat lumber strike is broken. For several days mediators between tho parties interested havo been industriously engaged in ondcav- cws to effect some settlement, and they have been successful The executive committee of the Milltnen's Union caused to be served on all mill owners copies of a plan of agreement Part of the mill force havo started to viork. Late Occurrences in Towns. In Kentucky. Ky.. S. Lov- Cooper, of Indiana, pro- for an Investigation of charges ie ayaiast Commissioner Rauro, of Pension OfSc.% Tho pro- that tho investigation shall becon- ctxttd by a select committee of five. la tho Will t'nited Sutes .Jc a decision into the cuatwij of United to be retaraevi v> TVej were in crosMd tbe border from Oriirlfml I' LOITISVILI.K, enthal Co., of Nashville, Tenn., havo opened an original package liquor houso at Russcllville, Ky., a town which hai local prohibition. Their men were ar- rested, but gave bond and the outlook is that they can not bo forced to close. Citizens held an indignation meeting and passed a resolution asking Congress- man Goodnight to vote for the bill coun- teracting tbo original package decision. KlertrlcMl Storm. SIIF.HOVKAX, Wis.. July terrific electrical storm visited Sheboygan Wednesday afternoon and did great damage. Two laborers at El wood's flour mill were struck. William Strass burg being instantly killed and Samuei Litsch paralyzed. A stable was ttruck by lightning and consumed. Schlicht' block struck three times, destroy- in? one of tbe stone towers. The ek-c- tric fire alarm boxes, telephones, etc., were burned out A A Younp .Man Oat With the Mothfi or a Girl Who Was Oiico Klndlny SonsAtion. July '.'5. -A romance in life was hero Thursday mora- ing, by tho announcement that Charles llussell, a young man of tu-ontv-foic yours, had Moped with Mrs. Henry a portly matron nearinsr tho half tury mark, and tho mother of an inter esting family, tho youngest of winch sixteen years old. Honind tho fact of tho elopement is a story illustrating the pranks sometimes with its vict.ms. A year or so ago young' Russell met and fell in love with Miss Anna Freed, a daughter of the woman with whom he loft the city. Russell and Miss Freed bivamc en- and as tho lady u as ,i favorite and tho man considered worthy, the en- gagement was looked upon as a nappy affair. Tho courtship progressed rapid- ly and the day for the was fixed; tbe bride's. trosseau boing it course of preparation when she was sud- denly stricken with a malign-nit fevot During the weeks of illness that foW lowed Mr. Russell was, at all times, de- voted and attentive to his artiancod, bu> love and medical skill could not avail against the steady march of the and after a month of struggle deatk claimed and took away his own Tht grief of tho man the loss of his promised wife seemingly, full and uino, and for months ho mourned the beautiful girl who had Leon taken fron him. Time, however, appears to have got- ten in its usunl healing tnvtmcnt. for yesterday moining Russell -an .iway with the mother of tne lady wht died one year ago. new, of the flight of the yoiui'T man 1 "Mrs. Freed was a terrible shock u> Ficrtt :mi3 the children, as well as to tho friends of the pair, who never suspcotod the m fatuation thev had for o.ich other Nn one knows wlvro tlicv hate- fjonu and it s understo'.d will be i o pursuit Mrs. Freed parried away wi'h quite sum of money belonging to hor hus- band, who has the sympathy of tho en- tire city. ACCUSED OF LlBx'iL. CltUtMi of llluksvlltu With TrBilaoiUK of m Yuuiif Womnn Whom 0., July Charles R president of the Law and Order league and also general agent of "Jniori Central Life Insurani-o Company, of Cincinnuli, has boon arrested here, charged with criminal libel. His clerk, iV. J. Holt, was arrested as an ao- oniplice. They waived oxaminatioa, and Everett's bond was llxrul at nd Holt's It is claimed thai Svcrett made an assau.c on Ida J. 'helps, an employe in his office, and hat to vindicate hinibolf fio issued siatf'incnt, that tho girl had im- TOpurly intunate wiih lior rifHanced, ra Cullon, and that they caino to him or advice; that afterward he induced fiss Phelps to sign a statement that ha had never mistrcatod her, which did while under tho impression that it was a contract othor parties tc which she wab a vvitnoss. Tho state- ment completely vindicated Evorott and threw disgrace on the girl, who is of. (food character. Akrons Pont- (flee Wnr. July There has bf-en new development in the local post-oOlce fight, but great interest is manifested in the conference at Washington. Since Colonel Conger succeeded in having tbe nomination of ex-Sheriff Gamble hung up the wires have boon kept busy night and day by the partisans on both sides, and thf struggle; developed into a row which can not bo by tho ap- pointmrnt of cither candidate in the fight. The matter has already entered Into the Congressional canvass in the Twentieth district. ST. by Lons. July is littlo voob war ihis (Aty Of O_ July A otber TVrrt WMTMH doubt that the United elevator property in St. fallen into the hands of Jay frould. control tbe elevator business of this section. Tbfy wili be run strictly in the in v; rests of PaciScroa-i otber Gould properties. Will Try to y. Y., will trot on 7 own the day to Tbe proposed between the two flyers not be arranged- OrHrtml Rill. TOTEKA, KWL, Jalj United States 9wpreme Justice Brewer original package bill is far reaching ani will prevent Anooar from shipping into beef, and will 4rm nto Attempts Snlcide. O., Julv Gili- Inger, of Claypool Svation. single, aged thirty-five, took an onm-M of laudanum Thursday morning and firod his house, which was totally (lostryvod. Laudanum not acting promptly boarded a train, came hero and purchase 1 another ounce took one-third of it. Thon he wan arrested and locked up. Tic will prob- ably recover. The cause was disappoint- ment in love. XKXIA, 0.. July old adopted daughter of Mr. George Wetmer, who lives some miles southeast of this city, disappeared mysteriously the other night and nothing has boon heard from her since. .She retired to her room as usual and nothing was seen of her afterward. The people of the neigh- borhood fear she has boon foullv dealt with. July Tho real es- tate appraisers of Holmes have made tbelr reports ar.d the same haw been tabulated. Tbc-y foot apSS.Ta.v 870, against 80, 045. no. a de-crease in ten of Tho personal and real ralaation is in tbe coun- ty. Tbere was a decrease in every town- bat one in ralao of real estate. O- July 'Squit% Sedan, aged eigbty-threc. an in an ate of County Infirmary, committed suicide Wedneaday by banging himself with rope to the beam of a bam. Cunmet Hnnter found a letter on tbe deceased. tbat be WM tired of life and to be bvrted by of ato I 1 II r Jui fiii! !iH i S'if fm: i i s r. m ijf us M i i: li'iiJ !i.; i i   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication