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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: July 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - July 24, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. II. NO. 173. the itted to Congress by the t_Mr. Blaiue Defends Seiz- j.e of Canadian Vessels ,d Siat.'i and Replies to tlw British and iilciillic.l M-niier, .XL-TON. Jnlv '.M.-The official t tho Secretary and Butiah government BIT the Ueirinar So a controversy ni-ted :u yesterday by .iiiitnt. Ta correspondence to .7. ittu-r K from Mr. Edwards, no British legation at 'tun "to Mr Blame, in wuicb the v of Slate is informed that re- reached Her Majes- >rnmcr.t tnat United State cruis- jtuput'iL s  DAY. Mr. intc entered -ily agreed, even their aos; subordi- ani doairc of ihe "This GoTern- Phelpj coaM be sn.de sa- ti of VetoraiM Lake. S. T. Ituiueunv Crowd itud gruUhed foritont In Attendance. SILVER LAKE, N. Y., July Wed- nesday was Grand Army day here and the veterans took entire possession. The Grant-Howard excursion train ar- riyed from New York and there was freneral regret when it was announced that Mrs. Grant was too ill to be pres- ent. General Slocum, who was also ex- pected, did not arrive. These were the only disappointments. All the other distinguished people who were invited are here. The hotels and cottages at the assembly grounds and the lake were crowded to overflowing. Fine weather is assured for the celebration, which bids fair to bo a pronounced suc- cess. Early yesterday crowds began to swarm in and about the assem- bly grounds and as the hour for the opening of the ceremonies approached there were over people present. At eleven o'clock Job R Hedges, com- mander of the Department of New York, Sons of Veterans, called the assemblage to order and made a brief address. He then introduced Major General O. 0. Howard, who delivered an address on the battle of Gettysburg. Jt was a mas- terly effort. Cbapittiu McCabe led the war songs which followed. A recess was then taken until two o'clock, when the crowd again filled the building to listen to Dr. G. A. Palmer, of New York, in his famous address "They Die No More." Colonel Sherman Richardson, of Roch- ester, then recited his original poem "Hancock at Gettysburg." The election of the officers of the Silver Lake Veter- ans' Association occurred in the after- noon. AN IMPOKTANT CASE. A Suit Son on Trial in Brooklyn to Uls- the 5 BROOKLYN, N. Y., July The suit to wind up the Sugar 'f rust was begun in the Kinjfs County Suprema Court day. The eleven trustees of the trust are tbe plaintiffs and several sugar rs fining firms, and five gentlemen who represent the holders of stock are the defendants. The plaintiffs allege that they hold moneys for which they are fully able to account, and that under a decision of the Court of Appeals all the corporations to tho trust may he dissolved, and thus tbe purposes of the have failed. The plaintilfs demand, among other thing's, that theacrroeraont bo rescinded or declared inoperative. TWENTY LIVES LOST. ftaftftmon on A Cnnitdmo River Dashed to Arnonjr the KnphU. MOXTBBAI.. Que., July A dispatch from Pembroke, eighty-six miles above Ottawa on the Upper Ottawa river, says that two days asfo some miscreant cnt the rope holding a raft of logs to the bank, where twenty-two raftsmen were stopping over night. The raft, with all asleep on board, drifted out into the river and into tho rapids, a mile below, and before those on board were awak- ened they tossed about among the rocks of the rapids. Of the twenty-two aboard only two got ashore, No trace of the bodies of the twenty have been found. _____ _ Will Have No Competition. Ciifavoo, .Tuly 24. The new Stock Yards syndicate has begun negotiations for tho purchase outright of the Nation- al Stock Yards at St. Louis, the Union Stock Yards at St. Joseph, Mo., tho Union Stock Yards at South St. Paul, and the smaller yards at lotva City. It is stated, further, that the immense cor- poration contemplates the netting of every cattle pen in this country. These developments would indicate that the syndicate is destined to be the most gi- gantic corporation in America. Republican Convention. LIXOOLX, Iscb., July The Repub- lican State convention was called to or- der at o'clock last night by Chalr- Uian Richards. Senator Churchhows was elected temporary chairman, and after the temporary organization was made by declaring the temporary organization permanent, and tho Appointment of the usual committees, the convenfton ad- journed for one hour. The prospects are for an all-night session. YOKK, Twenty striking cloakmakers made an assault on the people working in Colia lender's apart- ments at No. 4 Allen street yesterday and tried to compel thrrr. to stop work. The police dispersed the crowd and ar- rested the leaders. The other striking cloakroakers were standing on Esses and refused to move when ordered to do so by the police and were arrested. McGlnnln Will 'WASHINGTON-, July Tho report of the majority of the Committee on Elec- tions in the contested election case of .Tames R. vs. John D. Alder- son, from the Third district of Vi-ginia, was submitted to the House yesterday. The report copiously from the testimony taken in ih'j to show that Me' final's was oiocfd. givicff hita Tca-ority of thirty lllr Suit- Julr The trial of Vis- count Dur.lo's suit for concert sinrer formerly ituo-sri as Jfciiie Hilton, which fair to attract attention as the most of s-ch has :a the past. The and Sir dress for tho r-IaintilT iisiesed eagerness. BAIRITO BILL Another Day Spent in Discussing the Measure. Members of tbe House Generally Seen to Regard It as a Wise Piece of Legislation. Ifo Conclusion Reached the Indian Appropriation Bill, Thongo a Number of To. WASOIXGTOX, July rou line business yesterday the House resutoe.l dis- cussion o'the Qankruptcr bill. Mr. Abbott, of Texas, the measure In m oJ Us provisions. He said he would approve of bankruptcy bill %-hich wou.d do justice to the debtor and winch would pro'eci th'j hon- est crediior againsr the This was a measure lu the inieresi ot tiio creditor class. Mr. Fraak. of MissourL ssid the bill secured a prompt, equal certain and uniform operation of the law. 't was t'ie prn'luct of rainds which had opsrutod to to tUiR bmly what h" conceived to be the b-st fuilest uuJ rno-t accurate piece ot th t had ever beea to the Homo Mr. McCord or WIscorsm sail it wns n bill m the Inierest of two one beln? the wbolesnl" dei'lers, tlio other ttr- United Siaios marshals, attorneys court officers. Professional receivers and lawyers, would be enriched by the operation of the l.iw. Mr. Peel, of Arkansas, thought the effect of the law would be to Increase speculation. Mr. Adams oi Illinois, favored '.hr- bill and satd every increased the necessity for a national bimiqMptcy law. Mr. OuthwAite. of Ohio criticised tUe method in which this important measure being dis- cussed. If the bill were properly amended It would be one which would meet with his hearty approval. Mr. Breckenriflgc, of Kentucky, did not be- lieve that the time had come when the country was in condition us to population, lubor and wealth to adopt a permanent bankrupt pysVem. Mr. Bu h man. of Virginia, the bill. He held that a debtor shoul 1 not be punished for his misfortune, but for h's wrongful conduct. Thepe-idlifcr measure pum-hud him for both. E B T.iylor. of Ohio closnd the debate with a brief speech in advocacy of the measure. The bill then weui over until to day and the House adjourned. The Sen consideration of the Indian Appropriation bill. A pnragraph appropriating ts.000 to Indians in Minnesota heretofore belrmciai? lo the band ot Si 'Ui I and who have severed their tribal rel'i lions, rave rise to a discussion in the course of wnich Mr Dawes eave an in- terpstiau history of these InJi.ma He said they had given notice to th-: whites M the intended SimiT massacre in Minnesota, in 1852. and had aided in protecting the white women and chil- dren on th it occ.mon Tne following jimo'intR wore ugreed to: Inserting ;in item of JIM 001 to to the Chip- pewa Inrl'.iin-; cf Minnesntr. the awanl for dam ages Kusta'Mi-d bv them on account of the bu'lding f dums. cf. on Lake Cass Lake ana Loach L'ike: insertine an item of fl n.ChXt for rn'll-. tural iuipletncnts, and one of flfoftjO for surveys, etc. frr tho Irdi m1; of Tnras to bo reiw'oursed from the proceeds of the saies of the Chippewa IanJs. Adjourned. BASE BALL. Record of the Most Promi- nent Frofeculonal Clubft. Following are tiiu scores of AVednes- day's games: NATIONAL LF.AOtJE. At Xcw York 12. Chicago 13. At Cleveland Uo8tnn 3, Cleveland ft. At PtulsOelpljiii-Flusburgh 3, Phlladelpbia At No wet grounds. AMERICAS' ASSOCIATION. At New Brooklyn S 3t Louis 4. At Louiivllle 0. Athletics 4. At Columbus 13. Syracuse S. At Toledo 3, Rochester 3. LEAGUE. At No game rain At Boston 5. Chicago 8i. At Brooklyn H, Cleveland 14. At New York 7, Buffalo 8. Conclave of Cnthollc BOSTOJT. July Tho Catholic Arch- bishops of the United States assemlled for their annual meeting yesterday, in St. John's seminary at Brighton. Among the prelates present v.ero the following: Archbishops Ryan, of Philadelphia; Kenrick, of St. Louis: Feehan, of Chi- cago; Elder, of Cincinnati: Ireland, of St Paul; Janssons, of New Orleans: Riordan, of San Francisco; Gross, of Oregon; Williams, of tho New England see, and Cardinal Gibbons. The latter presided over tho deliberations. Arch- bishop Corrigan. of New York, is absent, owing to tbe controversy between him and Dr. Burtsell. Left Amounting to S125.OOO. July 24. Kokomo financial circles arc excited over the discovery that Foreman Cdoper, promi- nent attorney of that city, has fled to parts unknown, leaving no trace and un- paid debts amounting to S125.000, most of which is borrowed money. It is also claimed that many indorsements on notes are forgeries. Cooper enjoyed a good law practice and owned real estate, which is heavily mortgaged. His wite and several children are loft behind. They were unaware of actions and supposed he had gone away on business. U20O.OOO by nn In fire. SPOKANE Wash.. July 24. In- cendiaries started a flro Wednesday morning that destroyed 5200.000 worth of property on Monroe street, including the new bridge across the river, which cost Sre department was rendered almost helpless by tho lack of water. Fi-ro have been ar- rested and armed guards patrol tbecitr. The chief losers by the fire wero the Cable Road Company. Monroe Street Company. H. W. Company. S1S.OW; Boane Co.. SI 2.000. July Tbe by of bis Caxn'-t. General Schofi-M and a larg-e tiniest of officials. Fort on the Potomac- to iasp'-ct tbe troops of the District who are holding ibeir oacmnjpatni bj Scc- ABANDONED AT Loss of the Steamer by Fire iu Mid-Ocean. Heroic bat Unavailing Efforts to Save the Doomed Ship. After With MM for Twenty-foot- Crew Took to Were flehed Up on the Third Dor- NEW YOKK, July was re- ceived at the Maritime Exchange yes- terday that the stcamnr Egypt, of the National line. ad been abandoned at sea. She was on fire at tho time. The Egypt lelt here on July 10 for Liver- pool. She was commanded by Captain Sumner, and had a crew of seventy-two men. She carried a general cargo, in- cluding f340 of cattle. She ha.1 no explosives in her cargo and carried no passengers, having lately boen em- ployed tn freight traffic only. On July 15. when five days out from this port, fire was discovered in the lower hold of the steamer among 300 bales of cotton. The hatches wore bat- toned down and efforts made to smother the flames, but in spite of all the efforts of the crew and twenty-five cattlemen on board the fire burned fiercely and spread to 400 cases of lard oil which were stored amidships. The heat then became so great that all hands were driven aft and the cattle, driven mad by the flames, stampeded and overrun the ship." The crew battled with the fire all the night of the 15th and at daybreak on the 16th, seeing that their efforts were futile, it was decided to abandon the vessel and take to the boats. The captain and all of the seventy- two men of the officers and crew and toe twenty-five cattlemen then left the ship in three boats and after cruising about until five o'clock on 17th inst they were picked up by the oil tank steamer Manhattan, from which steamer the res- cued crew are expected to be landed at Dover. The steamer Spaarndam, which ar- rived at Rotterdam yesterday after noon, and which had sighted the Manhattan and taken on board a few of the rescued men and signaled the news of the disas- ter to Lloyd's agency at the Isle of Wight, has arrived at Helvoetsluis. Sad Accident at Unliith During Thrco During a Squall unit Two Men Lone Their Minn., July 24. During the progress of the race yesterday a sudden squall came up and three sailboats were capsized. Two of the men sank imme- diately. One boat contained a party of five, all of whom were provided with life preservers. They were picked up uninjured. In another boat were Rev. Mr. Lathrop and Rev. Dr. Dunn and throe others. They wore also picked up all right. The orew of the Koamorwere not so fortunate. She was being sailed by the owner, Charles Lindner, in the yacht race and with him was J. W. Clark, both of whojn were drowned. The Roamer wae heavily weighted and sank like a shot, giving the unfortunate men no chance for their lives. Lindner leaves a wife and three cjhildren. Huthlfrs Ordered to Strike. NEW Yoniv, July -The board of delegates of the building trades votod unanimously yesterday to call out all the union men working on any public school in the city. This will affect men The board the school trustees for awarding contracts with a proviso which will forbid subletting and which thereby brings in an inferior grade of workmen. The board of dele- gates will bold a meeting to-day in order to perfect arrangements for calling a general strike. A CanveleM Score. YORK, July 24. The police re- serves to the number of which were massed at the various police sta- tions Wednesday morning in anticipa- tion of a oontemplated riot by the cloak- makers, were notcalledinto service, the strikers remaining Iquiet and their de- monstration, if any was contemplated, wws knocked in the head by the quick action of Superintendent Tfyrnes. Anura- ber of the manufacturers have resumed work with non-unlen men. Fnnr Trolnmen Kltlrd In Collision. KAUKAUAXA, July A horri- ble accident occurred Tuesday on the Milwaukee, Lake Shore A Western railroad atTigcrton. Two heavy freight trains collided while rounding a sharp curve, killing four men and seriously and perhaps fatally injuring two more. llotb engines and nearly all the cars are a total wreck. Neariy all the killed and injured were residents of this place. A Good DETROIT. Mich., July Wednesday was the second day of the summer meet- ing of the Detroit Driving Club. The event of the day. the Merchants and Manufacturers' guarantee stake, was Tho fotrr b'-ats trotted were hotly contested by the large field of horses, tn the class Almont woa. in the pacing race Maggie R. lie victor. _ o strike. NEW Yonx. July Six I drivers of sprinkling i aadof the attached to th  two WM to this ciiy ar- oa a of pleaded not failtj ker tat tbis tsoraiaff for Pen is sow in street demand employ the ash-cm trittn Pa.. -fair to ihm fwrtortn to Cona., Jnlr Tbe toll by clrctric iMt aifkt itrto A mft tall iw tb he great farmer leader, has al- ready won in this district, when one county has acted, has proved a son- satlon of gigantic proportions, the effect of which is felt in heretofore entirely unexpected quarters. The story in brief is that Livingston is to oppose Governor John H. Gordon for the United States Senate. Livingston has sur- prised his best friends by the great strength he has shown in the debate with Judge Stewart. Livingston's name Is on every lip. The result is conster- nation at the Capitol. Governor Gordon's candidacy for the United States Senate to take Joe llrown's place when his term expires, has been an accepted fact, and the possibility of opposing him was never entertained either by Gordon or his friends. Hut it has leaked out that Livingston Las his eye on tbe Senate, and has been work- ing to that end. Tt is conceded that spventy-flvp per cent, of the next Legis- lature will be Alliance men, and these Alliance men worship Livingston, while Gordon has slept soundly, feeling secure in his position. A HANK. Two Sni'irvfh with Hoi CfMitninhiic a Lirifc Amount of Cnth unit QUKUKP. July A daring Itank rob- bery was porpetr.atfd here Tuesday afternoon. A buggy drove up to the Up- perto.vn branch of the Union bank and a entered and told Mr. Veasey, tbe manager, that the senile man in the buggy at the door wanted to speak to him about opnnine up an account, but was lame and unable to leave the vehi- cle. Mr. Veasey was alone at the time, but wont to the window to speak to the occupant of the vehicle and while his head was turned the man who camp in- side and who had presented a card hear- ing the name of "Rev. Mr. dis- appeared through the from door with a tin cash box which bo had nicked up. It was Rpvprrxl minutes before Veasey noticed the theft and though the police were at once cotificd. the sharpers had too good a start and have not yot boen heard from. They hired thoirbugtr.y from a livery stable and that, too, is missing. The box contained only in cash, but was filled with valuable bonds, in- cluding five debentures of the town of Levis, for each. -The police say Miat from descriptions furnished of the thieves, one of thorn is a famous swin- dler named Tleau. Will He M.ikp Mil rronilto? POKTT.AXH. MP.. .Tulv'24 Tuesday a wealthy Montreal man attcinptod to board a train at Old Orchard after it had started. He ran to the rear end of tbe baggage car and caught the railing, but lost his footing. As he was hanging to the railing ho swung between the cars and was losing his grip, when Frank E. Kolley, a boy peddler, saw him and managed to pull him on board the train. When the man bad recovered himself ho the lad's name, said he had saved his life, and promised to send him a check for when ho reached Montreal. ering ft Corner In Silver. NEW YOUK, July A Washington special quotes Director of tbe Mint Leech as saying: "The advance in the price of silver is due to speculation. New York parties are engaged in get- ting up a corner in anticipation of the now law, which goes into effect Septem- ber 13. The Western National Bank has stored away about ounces and upwards of ounces are hold by others in that city. The market may go Still higher.'1 Crnnhod to Death Under Stone. PorfiiiKr.ErsiE, N. Y., July 24. James Mason, an employe of the granite works, a short distance south of Gar- rison's, was descending a hill yesterday with a heavy load of stone on a wagon when the pole suddenly broke and the horses got beyond his control. The heavy stone slid forward, striking Mason and killing him instantly. One of the horses was also killed. Kleven NEW YOKK, July Sunday last cloven young men and boys, who called themselves the "Midnight Pleasure hired a cat-boat at tbe Jamaica J'ay Uousc. They said they were going to Staten Island for a sail. Nothing has since been heard of tbe boat, or its occu- pants. -It is not known whether the young men ran away with the boat or met with an accident. Truln Arrested. DrLUTii, Minn.. July as tho train on the Omaha road pulled out Tuesday three men boarded it Shortly after the train left the depot they began operations by throwing r'-d pepper in the eyes of tho passengers nearest them and then began to collect all the jewelry and valuables handy. One of tho men was arrested in Superior, and the other two Dulutb. tondonrtt. CoL. July 24 rain? arc reported from Central City during the past few A cloudburst oc- carre-l Maryland Mountains, doing great the line of the Colorado Cen- tral railroad. Two -awnen and a child. camping on Beaver brook, wore swept by torrent drowned. Arrow the Ootloent. Jnlj week the Pftdflc Railway Ckwnpany ootn- arrangements MOM ago for tbe purchase of the entire BroMwick railway and to its own iron. tVe New Brunswick system comprises Mtcljr tM ailM of railjraj-. Narrative of Late Occurrences Among Ohioaus. THE FOCilTH COMMUTATION Sharkey, the Freble County Murderer, by Governor Campbell. O., July some un- known reason, but probably on account of tho recent wholesale pardoning of convicts from the penitentiary, there a disposition shown in the Governor's office to suppress news relating to tho pardoning of criminals or tho commuta- tion of death sentences. The Governor, before leaving for New York on Satur- day last, issued pardons to three men on the recommendation of tho Hoard of Par- dons, but thp fact was ourofully sup- pressed. It is now stau-d that Elmer Sharkoy, tho Preble County murderer, sentenced to hajgAugust 1, was granted a respite by the Governor until August but this, too, was carefully kept from tho public, and only known through an accident. Tho extension of Sharkejr's to August 20 makes the fourth man re- spited bv Governor Campbell, the time for whose execution has bai-n fixed for that others bcinir Hrocky Smith, Otto Louth and Isaac Smith. It would be a physical impossibility to hang them between midnight and sun- rise as the law prescribes, as thr-y would have to go one at a time, and at the very least calculation, without allowing for possible accidents or dolayw. and counting on tho neatest sort of work on tho part of the hangman, it would be five o'clock in tho morning, long after daylight, before the last victim could bo prepared to drop through thp hole, and the probability is thai theiv will bo further respites or uomnuit.itions. MUHDBK AND SUICIUK. A Uelmont County OHiclal Slin'itt Hii Wife Then WUEKLIXO. NV. Va.. July i.---Wednes- day morning at four o'clock Matidvillo Ault, Deputy Recorder of V.ehnoiit county, Ohio, while laboring under a temporary fit of insanity, caused by tho death of his child and sickness, shot himself in tho head with .1 revolver. The ball passed around the skull with- out doing serious damage. !Ic immedi- ately turned and shot his wife, who was standing near, killing her instantly. Fie then went to his father's barn and hung himself to tho rafters. The shoot- ing occurred at bis home near Cetttre- ville, Belraont county. HUilLEl> INTO Two Men litHtiintly Klllcil a Holler Plourlne Mill Wrecked. Yot'NGsTowN, 0.. July 2-1. bollor in tho flouring mill of Moade IJros., at North Jackson, ton miles west of here, exploded yesterday morning, instantly killing George Meade, one of tho pro- prietors, and engineer William Thomas. Both were frightfully wangled. Will- iam Mikesell, an employe, was badly in- jured. The onirineor was vn tho act of starting tho ouymc when the boiler let go. The mill is a total wreck. Pieces f f timber wore thrown through the drug store of U. F. Phillips, nearly wrecking it. Tho boiler was old ono, having been in use ten years. Suicided bv Dvvi'o.v, O., July Ool- man. seventy-four yours of ago, com- mitted suicide Tuesday evening by hanging. Climbing into the loft of a wood-shod in which could not move about without stooping, Oolman at- tached a, cord to a rafter, made a noose of one end. which he put around his neck, sat down and choked to death. Despondency, occasioned by the death of bis wifo, wtiich occurred several months ago. is tho supposed cause. Died Very Sntldenly. IlTT.i.f iiiiKO, 0., July 24.-TUirch Uragg, a farmer, thirty-live years, who lives near this county, died suddenly in Dr. II. M. Brown's offlco Tuesday afternoon. lie had come in for treatment, and complained of severe> pains in the and while tho doctor was fixing his medicine Hragjf suddenly began to shako violently and expired without uttering a word. It is sup- posed he burst a blood vessel. Suicide of i 1'ioiicer. July Stob- bins, ono of the old pi moors of Brecks- villo, committed suicide on Wednesday morning by cuttinghis throat. Mr. Steb- bins was about ninety years old, and lived with his wife on tho homestead near the Valley road. The couple had been married sixty years and brought up a large family. Of late the deceased had been in health and was worried about his> property affairs. Stark Connty> I'opulatlon, CANTON. O.. July census enumeration of Stark County has boon completed and shows' tho population of the county to be against in IS-'rO Seven townships in tho county siiow less, whilo the three cities of Cao- ton, Massillon and Alliance show biy gains. Canton has20.1.VJ in 1S30. ii.Stt in 1SSO: 10.201' in in ItW; Alliance in 4SM in 1800. tVltl fture Nitftiml Nomv.u.K. O.. received by Mayor Crawford from O'Day. one of tho head men in the Northwest- ern Natnral Gas Company, says gas will be piped to Norwalk before cold weath- er. Kusiness men arc iubiUnt. WtilpptJ the Invaders YOKK. July cablegram from La Libertad. San Salvador. The lavest news froro the frontier con- firms the reports in respect to the vic- tory over the forces of Guatemala in battle o! Julj 17- The Gaatenja'.ans, invaded Salvador. killed MO, many 5-U I HM r? .f ijii'mi "ii fit iHiili ti i   

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