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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: July 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - July 14, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE ALEM DA NEW, SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY JULY 14. 1890. .r Calamity on Lake in Minnesota. lioat is iu a Cy- and Over 100 Perish. Scenes of Horror on Board lil-Fated Craft. phe VVhuh Has Ni> Parallel In ,r} ,if UrslL'lll t inluT I'l.'-c'-i iii the Track of 'in. M nn :i.. It. llil.' W lie most dis- i..never if-uck tbis d uvor ihi-i city at nino "t-'-.L-riing1, a of I'.'ie IAO hundred peo- cronenv to dn extouL v.viruiir not be esti- Y.ir I'nt was visit- .n !..iko t ur ii'id uas sitting w't ipM  trees had been cleared i the front of tho house your Jent surted out and soon iar a horrible calamity had be- nl.irc. tnat has not been the St. Cloud cvclone ago. 1'cople began to thf- streets   Noiv Under Arri-st for SIior.lT. If Pal, a Tex., July Tem- ple, a bartender at Fort Worth, was brought here Saturday by United States Marshal Knight on suspicion of beinir ;onnected with the train robbery at Prior's creek, in the Indian Territory, last November, lie had an examining trial before Commissioner Ledrum at which he made a statement under oath that he was one of tbe two parties con- cerned in the robbery. The othe.r was a man named Mitchell, alias West, who 's known to the authorities to be Turl- ngton. now under arrest at P.ooneville. Mo., for tbe murder of a sheriff. Tom- ale says that he and his partner secured three revolvers each by robbing a store it Dennison and they proceeded to Prior's creek and held up tho train. Fatal Knillng of a Quarrel. NEW YOKK, July H.-Guorge A. Schnei- der, aged twenty-seven, living on Court- land avenue, found hi- wife and three children on the roof with a nrm Satur- day night- He began to upbraid his wife, when George L. Sv.artz interfered. Tho men quarreled and c'.ir.'-bod. T; rolled oft the roof together, falling four Stories to a paved yard. S-.vart7. sus- tained a fracfir- of th" sk'ili and 'c-'l iiiternaliy. It is ould like to pasi if he preparing a measure to otati his convictions. But it was a bill tha vvould answer the demands of tho :oun try: the demands of the silver miner tho agriculturalists, the laborers and the business men of the country. I would give an additional circulation o a year at the present price o silver. If silver wont up to a paritj with gold it would give an increase o The last section of the bil unlocked now tied up for th< redemption of bank notes, making the total increase of circulation in the next twelve months Mr. Cutcheon, of Michigan, regarded the conference bill as a vast improve tnent over tho monstrosity sent here by the Senate, which proposed to make the United States mints the dumping grount for all the silver of the world for che benefit of speculators. It would give the country an additional currency ol metal and paper for the use of business. Mr. Herrmann, of Oregon, said thai he favored the bill, although it did not contain the fullnst recognition of tho equality of gold and silver as money metals. It was a victory for tho popula'r demand. It was a long step towards free coinage. He had no doubt thai after the tall elections there would be a stronger representation here on the line of free coinage of silver. Mr. Kland. of Missouri, concurred with the gentleman in hoping that the next House would be a coinage House. But that House would be composed of who advoc.nod five coinage and who shvxl by their colors. It not be composed of the 'Republican party, which by gag rule, had voted down and stirted free aoinaga. fie denied that the bill tne tof a free and fair conference. the result of secret of t'.i 11 'publican conferees. He, as a conferee, had known nothing of the moas'iro un'i! it had been framed and the repoit ready to be signed. The time allowed for debate having expired, the previous question was or- dered and the voto was taken upon agreeing to the conference report. It was agreed to by a strict party vote- yeas nays The Silver bill has now passed both houses of Congress in tho identical terms in which it came from tho confer- ence committr-o Monday. After be- ing enrolled it will receive the signa- tures of the presiding officers of houses and will be sent to the President to-day. in SINGEliS'JFESTIVAL. Utlosi, X. Y.. Ocooratctl Honor of VKitlni; SocU'tles. UTICA. X. Y., July twenty- fifth anniversary of the Utica Maenner- chor begins to-day and continues three days. Singing societies from Xe-.v York, Albany, Cleveland, Syracuse, Pough- keepsie, Amsterda-n, Troy, Colnrnbus, 0., and other cities -fvill be present. The P.cetbovon choir and the Mozart Singing Society, from Xew York, and tbe fJesanrrvcrpin Flarmonie. of Cleve- land, arrived last evening. The city is already well decorated with German and United States flags and bunting, but by this afternoon there will be few places in the city, either of business or residence, that will not have some sort of decoration in hr-nor of the occasion. General Funeral. Coi.r.vv.vTKi'.. Mich.. July re- main5! of ''ritieral Clinton 15. Fisk reached this ritylSaturday afternoon and were met at the depot by the G. A. R., "VV. C. T. U.. delegates from tho Prohi- bition Club and a la ge body of citizens As bad been held in Xew York theday iirtjviou-., the remains were taV-n at once to f ).ik Grove Cem- etery, where tbe burial service was a s-ng a choir and the laid to r'-st beside those of two f-bi'.'iren -.-.bo JiM many years asro in St Lor. is. Another Srrap With X. Y.. -luiy Con- "eo" Ike Weir. Conner- ;s with th" result OrUlnal and Bankruptcy Bill Will Have the Klfht of Way at the Other End of the Capitol. WASIIIXOTOX, July is only one thing certain about the programme of Xho Senate for tho coruinij week and that is that the Sundry Civil Appropria- tion bill will bo taken up. Before ad- journment Saturday afternoon the tariff bill was made the unfinished business of the Senate, which makes it pretty certain that that measure will be taken up for discussion when the Sundry Civil bill is out of the way. But there is no certainty that the Democratic members of the Senate will permit the Sundry. Civil bill to i ut through within the week. It is geno ally recocrnued us a fact that the Democratic policy in the Senate is to bo one of delay until it is determined that the Federal Elections bill is to go over to the next session, or until that measure is passed. The caucus of Republican Senators to be hold early in the week will come to a determination on the subject of a pro- pramme for Senate action, and when that programme is announced, the Dem- ocrats will know how to govern their conduct hereafter. Until the Republic- ans come to a excision, however, the general belief is that the Democrats will keep the discussion on tho Sundry Civil bill going. What the decision of the Republican caucus will be is a mat- ter of much doubt. A majority of the Republican Senators who met m caucus Thursday night favor a change in the rules of the Senate under which debate can be limited, and subsequently the passage of the Federal Elections bill. But the enemies of this proposition on the side of the chamber claim that they can muster enough "bolters" to defeat caucus action, with the assistance of the Democrats. Sen- ate caucuses are never considered abso- lutely binding. They are rather ad- visory, although it is a bold member of the Senate who will repudiate caucus action. The Republican caucus will likely be held to-night. It will deter- mine the program me of tho Senate. The House this week will probablj fo.'.ow tho programme determined on by the Committee on Rules, the disposal of the Original Package and Bankruptcy bills. Mr. Payson's Land Grant Forfeit uro bill is well on its way to final dispo- sition and he will hardly object to tho consideration of the other bills, as he did last week. While no definite pro- gramme has been determined on, it ii safe to say that the bankruptcy anO original package measures will havc- tho right of way, with the contested election cases of L-ingston vs. Yenablc. from the Fourth Virginia district, and of Miller against Elliott, from the Elev- enth districtof South Carolina, as possi- bilities. PA E It 1C AN KAIL W A Y. Ground ISrokon for r.ine is to Connect Xorth South America in Uands of Steel. GENERAL FREMONT DEAD. "The Fathflader" and First Republican Candidate for Away After a Snort W YORK. July General John Charles Fremont died at his residence, No. 49 West Twenty-fifth street, at four o'clock Sunday afternoon. His death was sudden and unexpected, and re- sulted from an attack of peritonitis. Dr. Martin attended the patient, but was unable to afford'roliof. Tho General was out Friday, in apparently good health. His son, who lives at Sing Sinir, was notifi d of his father's illness, but was unable to reach New York before death occurred. General Fremont born January 13, ISIS, at Savannah. Ga.. his father being a French emigrant. He gradu- ated at Charleston College, t.iug'jt mathematics, became an euiruieer in the Government employ in the West, re- commission as lieutenant of sinned coived a engineers, explored the Rocky Moun- tain region and gained great fame bv TWO CENTS. LATEST NEWS ITEMS. Gilthvre.l by Trlecrupli From all 1'arti irf the Earth. MONDAY, Jl 14. Advices from the interior of Egypt state that the have against the Mahdi. Ar Omaha, Nob., Ed Xeil.convicted the murder of Allan Jones, has been sentenced to be hanged on OouVbo 2.1. Tho Reading Railroad Company's Key- stono colliery at Ashland! 1'a.. has started up after several months' idle- ness. The works employ SOU persons. William Vinal Kurt, son of ex-posb- mastcr William L. Hurt, of has been indicteii for loi-j-ery. He has boeu nogotiatin.tr nott-s bearing his name. The Jo.tnna furnaco at Heading, one of the i-i c-ountrv, which ha s been iult trade is improving. The lockod-ou- of makimr trade it: Y ort tba; OEKEKAL JOI1M a FREMOST. I Wall Tox., July The first practical step towards tho great Pan-American railway from North to South America has just been taken here. Ground was broken Saturday for tho Corpus Christi South American rail- way. The first division is 150 miles long and extends from the Rio Grande to Corpus Christi, at which point itcon- necta with the railway system of the United States. The Rio (trande is to be bridged from to Matamoras and a line extended to the City of Mexico over a route sov- ral hundred miles shorter from St. Louis, Chicago or New York than the existing line. From the City of Mexico it continues south to the Guatemala ine and beyond. Work is now in prog- ress at both ends of tho first division, which will be completed in about nine months. The Mexican and United States authorities participated in the exen-isos Saturday and an international salute was fired across tho Rip Grande. Another One of July 14. -The Times tate' on authority of Colonel Ii. If. secrc-tary of the Pennsylvania Grange, that thf lettrr pur- porting to been President Harrson accepting an invitation to tho Granro exhibition at Carlisle. Pa emanated from W. B. Fabor. of Carlisle the ssm" man who originated the repor: that f h.irles H-nry Loa. of Philadelphia. h.-id "rr.r; out for a rr-port -'.iniod by Mr. over his own TI CHI-VK. Pa.. was driven Pat-.rday afu-moon in road ovnnfnioni an-J of in- bis successful penetration to the Pacific coast through almost incredible hard- ships. He took a prominent part in the conquest of California, was elected as onoof the first United States Senators rom that State was the first Republican candidate for President, in 'ifj; served in the Union artny as Major General was nominated br tho Presidency by the Cleveland lonventlion in but declined the nomination and has not since taken an active part in politics, though he was ippomted Governor of in 187S. Of late years he has boon engaged in ronvoting Southern railroad entor- jrisos. His wife, formerly Jessie "Ren- on, daughter of the famous Thomas lenton, of Missouri, survives him. VfO 7f H CS. Muullltf Mill, Yj.nl I'apcr Factory SCOO.OOO. July which riginated Sunday morning in If. T. At- cinson's turning and planing mill at street and Snsijuchanna avenue, estroyed that structure and mo-it of At- cinson's lumber in the yard opposite, nd then spread to and destroyed Carey Bros.' five-story wall paper factory, oc- upying an entire block, by lUo'feet. The fire spread so rapidly that no at- tempt could be made to save the factory and all efforts were concentrated upon preventing the spread of tlie flames among tho surrounding tenements. Those wore saved, though many of them were scorched and some of tho roofs were smashed by the falling walls of the factory, the occupants escaping by hur- ried flight. Caroy Bros, estimate their loss at on stock and machinery and on building: insurance Mr. Atkinson places his loss at insurance S27.000. Adjoining property was damaged to the extent of about 000, making the total loss about 000. The origin of the fire is unknown, but Carey Bros.' watchman alleges that it started in Atkinson's stable, where several men had been carousing during the night. John Trumpy, foreman ol Carey Bros.' designing department, was overcome by smoke while attempting to save some valuable designs and had a narrow escape. AKrreim-ut iK'.-irned. NEW YORK, July cloak oper- atives' committee and a committee of tho Cloak Manufacturers' Association held another conference Saturday, but could come to no agreement over the sixth point in the demands of the work- men. This related to the discharging of the employes who had worked during the lockout. 1,  'o July nt f, IS CHI' Aft' I. .lU.'y Jyly July T a' Jair a: at I, J'jir a: .v .it A T'.i.rrt'. .T'j'y U an-l a'. J'Jiy a! :i; t LUri :2 at m i'l -'ij! il p m m XT t fii n'i- ml .i; lm i- Mi l-hlw j f, -f isiil tj xi   

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