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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: July 8, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Salem Daily News

Location: Salem, Ohio

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - July 8, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. PL. II. NO-159- SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY JULY 8. 1890. TAVO CENTS. Over North Minnesota. I'-- SllffM'5 Fury--Mother i'liil'li'cii Killed. IVi 11 oil tin- N'lrtilfl-Il PHCifiC i I roni the 1'r.ick mid a o. i-iipini-. Woumled. n.. .I'-.lv S. A tornado o'clock Monday a strong i'ui no attention was I'.tst tvv.) o'clock, .v the re- a i.' lud veered v 'iv t lie Ke-l river and it will in.- remem- eise. Tin- storm de- and d-ixvn the electric strn'.-i' 1 fie fronts of the block, the the Opera House biy.'k. unroofed the {.-eight depot, also the and C.ipin's hardware a.11- i1 is badly on the side- rer.t.'i The Plymouth is destroyed. The re Company s warehouse >.l. numerous h'.'.M'k lie on the ground. '.'..irehousi; is damaged to a- .1-; ,ii o Alfstad's hardware i V.i'-'ien's a d the eifii-r.t on the Hank of North on the ground in ruins. The luck and 1 'vchange Hotel suf- !y. of smaller build- roits uf 'dewalk are demol- iti.'xt uf all 's the death of thn of the mother f the late Captain v.'liii-h o 'ci rred at their resi- :hi'corner of Ninth and Fifth Tne family 'iad taken refuge l.ir ami in some manner were n the, timbers of the falling .-ra-lied to death, so 1. Northern Pacific pnssen- just as it was departing .ro an 1 ivas top, ed over into a u was killed, although six- ,'r were mor.> or less injured. .Mp-i-ted of three ami' e.i-.i'he-.. i .-p'.Ti.il car containing a -v Norih .'estern ofii- Mr. .VcCabe. Thn i'l the succeeded in ati'l-.ivinjr thoir valuables, al- in the dark. A fain went to 1. rs' labor n- r.) run. UVOr .Northern a .in 1 fel', at De- v. n tho 3-5 of the Kncr-d oltice Miii.st st'Mic.c by 'ning f.-d up. Minn.. July a 1 1 uv -r i ,ns eitv n si'jrnlni wa- rr-ver equalr-d in of Min 'rxo'.a. Fully prone :v was done in this ,i people being far as js no ft-tn li'y. The rnosr, se- to pro ;h- blow- the foundry: also tho t to the Great rji.ro.iil. part of the rooJ .v.-re blov.'n from 1 Aoraia; Se'm ,1. also from the i'K'1. 'ble damage hi) oU. A number of 1 '1 couiu. y near town, AI 'I'-iua andcon-iderable dam- The grain elevator S -nilc.s of here, is across the Xorth- "r. in places almosS ati'l accompanied y an ex- II. (lj.jpj.jy Si.'.ierior distri-I early A; i'oughDn out- f'-n.'vp. etc.. w.-rc de- of Jenny Vijrninx, and snriousl_ in- i- in .1 x reel and the police sta- th" consta- The mob '.'_._'' ''iear a passage-j r, hour. Girec- A-s r-.Biiya njfi i Two I'roiuinent Ex-ConfeJernt-s May Ficht a Kvcaune of a UUputo at to General Malione'g Abilit.T. is brewing between General Jubal Early and Major J. Horace Lacey. who was one of General Holmes' start officers in the Confederate army. The trouble is the outcome of the bitter Ma- houe campaign last fall. General Karlv took occasion to contradict a of Major Laeey's to the elTect that Gen- eral Robert E. Lee had once that if i he were to select a successor to himself at the head of the Confederate araiy ha would have chosen Muhone. Each of the gentlemen have sir.ee de- nounced each other through the news- papers, and at the recent, unv'-ilinir ,.t the Lee statue in Richin-nd. Early re- fused to recognize Lacey when thn lat- ter accosted him. The Lance publishes a statement, from Major Lacey reaffirm- ing the truth of his statement as to General Lee's admiration of Mahone, and denouncing Er.rly as a drunken blackguard. The major adds that he "will not permit a man of Early's char- tcter and reputation to insult mo with- out such resentment as a gentleman should show." He also promises to fur- nish the Lance with a history of General Early's war record, to show how utterly useless he, was in the Confederate army. AKOU8ES FKKLIXG. thnt the of the J'edcritl KltM-tiinm II-M Will K.-snlt in :i ISoycott on XortlKTii I'roducts Hiisl Negro 1-nlior by Soiitlicriiers. CixrtN.v.vn, July -A prominent wholesale merchant of Charleston. ,S. C., who does not wished to be named, la in the city, and talks freely on South- ern sentiment, regarding the Federal Election bill. Ho says the people of thn North have no idea of the intense feel- ing that exists among all classes in tho South over the proposed measure. There is no disposition to talk about it or make threats, but the passage of the bill will be the .signal for the creation of the e.xtremest bitterness, a fueling that will undo all that the years of pence have accompli-Oipd, and that will find 7iianifestation in action. First of all every Northern product, as far as possible, will be boycotted. Following this will come the most ex- tensive i.ovott on labor the world ha; ever known. Ar- rangements are already under way to secure abroad thousands nf white labor- ers, and every negro employe in the en- tire South will be discharged, and no Southern man will, under any pretext, give one of them employment, the ob- ject being to drive tlicru into the North and West. TORONTO. Out.. July .special of the Customs Department is here investigating a fraud of several years growth. Nerlich Co.. of this city, one of the oldest, largest and hitherto most reputable tobacco firms in Canada, arc ibe offenders. Formerlv the government allowed importers of Havana cigars to put the import labels on the boxes, but several years ago withdrew the privilege and instructed its otlicrrs to collect all the stamp? in possession of the The col- lectors overlooked Xcrlicb   Washington of the chairman of the Commit- tee on FriviU'g-s and Klections iMr. Hoari. Mr. Moivan th_- Senate on the sh bills. Hi- sat-'.-reMe i to Mr. frje to let the experiment be tried of pcrtnittiri1.' American citizens to bnv abroad and to sa 1 them under an Anier.can All hostile cotn- iiiereial had lent' since heen aban- doned by all nat ons except the Cnited States in tlii1- one instanc o! forbidding tbe use of vessel1- under the Am rican tlasj that are not built in the T.'niTe.! S'ntcs. Mr. Morgan yielded th Bocir temporarily and Jtr. Shermin present r 1 the-ronf-rence report on the S'lver hill Ait ritw.ixre.nl in full he giue notice mat lie call u up for action this favor of the bill .'uJ after a brief session the Senate adjourned Hurst; '.h'- directed the iour- nal to be read r. Ko.'ors. o.' Arkansas, raided the lontin er'er '.hat was no iiuorum Ti-e r. -r r-i'in'.c-d ninety one mt-m- berx unil u call o the ordered. One hundr'Ml and s --even -a quorum responded to: lie'r names ,ind the journal of read, sts tor le.ive of absence Mr Dumicll. of Aliuue- to be a jreni-rai stampede ow it i of the in the chniri for tir -s.-naV- bill to forfeit 'ore for thy pur i on-truction of railroads, Thur.-dav'r- p'o A r of having b.'en pr-.'x -ri sola, fa'd if there the Ho sluniUl k The Koiixe ;hvii 'A Whole i Mr. Pete-s. the consi.leration ot ce  Th" U an) thou-ancN M miners are rushing into the fain p. AlKii.'MM) Ixisi Ind.. disas- trous fire out Monday afternoon in th" factory  rjjr lure Company. so'.n Control. TIi" "Ttin- .Vv.i ,r la--: Th" ar-- as j SK: OW: Kv.in-.viii'- 13- j 't-icd in tlio city. llctroii. -.vcre tullv 000 vieitiriir i-.l and escorted to ns; t lie Lac. Omaha. St. Deiner. St. Paul. ;'.nd Mt. Clemen-.. came durinsr tiio onler w ho were i-xi Rvt-ry train and lit, I visited, and by Flics had hven ivoi- their headquarters. which uerc Phil-.uitdphia, in-rton, IJaUinuM-c. ilir. Cliii-ajjo, 1'orts'rouih, Mich.: l-'ond Louis. Minneapolis. Detroit, (.Irand H.rpida A nuinhi-r of otU'.'ra afternoon, and more are expected. The first business was tlin reception and the lirst meeting of the reunion, whirh was held at thft Opera House shortly after eleven o'clock. The ita-je of the Opera House beautifully decorated with American fiiigs and hujre elk antlers. Prominent. amonu' the other decorations wi-re mottoes of the ordur. "Jus- "P.rotiierly Love" and "Fidelity." There were about live hundred Elks present when the the audience was. called to order. The meeting was called to order by F. L. IMebolt. exalted of Cleveland No. IS Mr. Diobolt extended tho courtesies of Cleveland to the visitors, and hoped that their st.sv in the city would be marked with hrotli- erly love. Ho then introduced Mayor Gardner, who welcomed the visiting- Elks. Otlicers (if the, ue.re rhon elected and a number of vi-.it inir broth- ers made speeches. In the evening reception was tendered the visitors. Vu-lini of 11 Mod; .M CI.KVKI.AND. .luly A irood-looking- woman called at the Contra! station Monday mornintr weeping piteously. She claimed she was the wife of Theodor l-'illpski. a youny mechanic of this city. Mrs. Filipski said that her husband lofv home Tlni'-.sday after t dlinjj her his uiarria-je to her about luivc year-; nq-o was only a mock aflair ami he was tired of her. lie has not returned. Tho woman has two small children and her husband has provided for her but scantily she is very poor. AtuilluM- Vli-liin Con I Oil. CANTON. 0., .July S. Susan JJrice, np-ed thirty-live, housekeeper for Mrs. Steiner. attempted to hurry a fire with coal oil Hor clo hint; took flro and was almost roasted alive before holp came. Tne llesli fell oif her body when she was picked up. The wxs a most siclceninrr ono. The skin from her hands which came o'J looked like a pair of kid gloves. She diod yesterday. Fill n I ly Itnrncil. HcTYisr-. .July s. Sunday afternoon Tommy Francis, son of T. Francis, was playinjr with lire in !iis father's barn. In some way liis ctof.hinjj caught tire and in hi.-, exr.itement the boy ran to tho house. This but, fed the I'amr; ;uid be- fore it could be extinguished he was ter- ribly burned. It is also believed by tho doctors that, be inhaled the tlainos ami they have no h-jpr-sof liis recovery. Option tClcctiim. ii'ii. i.. O.. .Inly Official returns from the option election hold in this (York i township. Athens County, Show a majority of for the sale. The Same township two years ago pave a ma- jority of M ttie sale. Rer.nrr.s from the adjoining township, Hocking County, show u majority o! one against the sale. Tho saloon-keepers will _ Klr-krtl AlfoiUKt rtttlK In Clinrrb. SriUN'.FlKi.D. 0.. -lulv !S. Rev. A. tt. Hornolils. of Mfchariicsburg1. who occu- pied the Methodist Episcopal ptdpit last Sunday, created a bijj sensation by preaching strongly against tho of fans in church. lie advised the congre- gation to think of North Pole and thf-y -.vouldn't need fans. peopl" and Indignantly lefl the _____ Tiiri- to ('sill flRmi'. f.eld l.asfs ball "iuh it about t'" under. Pm-r fiatronage is i-- in :t of '-vine to thincs. IV'. '-r tho nd vn -Joiiars Flint 'tn w-'-.-: 33] azr--'rj j Nr.-. Pi--: t.vr-l far- ha- v. .1 3 river. s t roll-, tie Ko ;i 8F I It i'ln f-.t H: ATS o! work.   

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