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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 30, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 30, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. YOU IL NO. 153. COXOBR9BIONAL OUT10OK. lotto OMtBty, Mith. Tontaty flM Ml MM. UTO> Stork Kilted. rruilfDv Miek., June cyclone 1 over this town and Orange, in County, Saturday afternoon, caus- rreat damage. The storm first c William Sayres' timber, a tract i acres of fine hard wood, and 4 tbe whole grove, tearing up the by the roots or twisting them into hds of fantastic shapes. From ,he cyclone crossed a belt of open ry, carrying fences ana trees with idward Harwood's barn was in the of the tempest, and it was first L flre by lightning and then de- bed by tne wind. Three valuable i were killed. Stephen Drum's i was blown: to atoms and the y of five buried in the ruins. All ed alive, .howerer. Farm fences jliterated and dozens of persons id. Crops are ruined and much killed., rnorr, Mich., June a f thunder storm here Saturday icon a heavy wind of cyclonic pro1 >nn swept over the extreme weat- wt of city: The large frame je house of the Moreton Truck and ge Company, on the corner of the igan Central tracks and Twenty i street, was almost completely de- bed. Two or three of the new elec- ight towers were twisted out of i, and trees and fences were leveled, ng along the main -.line of the igan Central the wind scooped every in its 'path. Loose and coupled were started and telegraph leveled. No one was hurt. The nt of damage has not yet been esti- i. .LSDALB, Mich., June cy- is reported as having struck Read- aturday afternoon and that several ingsTwerei blown down, one man 1 and sevenal severely hurt Par- meager, as all 'the i .VEBty, O.', Jane windstorm d over this section Saturday after- scattering'every thing before it -was done near anan, this county.-where the storm aed the proportions of a tornado. ling wheat was almost entirely de- ed and much of it in the shock was M! by the lighi tril ng, which was very Y. Full .reports of the damage throughout the county can not be The lightning struck the court j here, shattering timbers, setting fire, and stopping all business ig the frightened county officials, lay shed in which some harvest s had taken refuge, on the farm of is near here, was also k. Two.of were very usly injured by the shock, and an- received a frightful wound from a ter of wood shattered from the ilng, striking him on the head. LTTMBUS, Ind., June terrific rical storm occurred here Saturday noon, which paused one-half of our ms to seek refuge in cellars. Nine ric bolts followed each other in I succession with loud peals of der. The large barn and cattle 9 of the American Starch Works struck by a bolt of lightning and to atoms. Damage, ttoa bills wiU ooeapy most, if all. of he time of the Sesate during the week. Che District of Colnnbia and appropriatJon bills will bo discussed, aad there is a probability thai the Idaho Statehood hill will come up. The Senate will probably adjourn oa Thursday until Monday. In the House the first three days of the week will be devoted to the consid- eration of the Elections bill, which will m placed on its passage on Wednesday. So programme for the remainder of the week has been arranged, but Thursday will probably be set aside for the con- sideration of the National Bankruptcy nil, or possibly the Compound Lard bill and an adjournment will probably be akenon Thursday until the Monday lollowing. HE PJLEAD PO VEKTT. :J9 Convicted of Peu-iioa Prkads Oowto In Default of a Heavy Fine. Lee Wilson, Representative in the Ust General As- sembly from Shelby County, recently xmvicted of pension frauds and fined entered court Saturday and ihrough his attorney, announced that je is unable to pay the flue. The court evidently felt that lie had been over- reached by this plea of Wilson, as only a jail sentence could follow, and at the end of thirty days Wilson can demand lis release under the poor convict law. The court said that this ending of -tho case was a surprise to him, and inti- mated that if be had thought such a thing; possible he would have made the sentence imprisonment He then sentenced Wilson to jail, and. though he asked that he be confined here, he was ordered to Noblesville. UNDER TMWUEELS. Bank to be Arrested. ILADELPHIA, June Warrants le arrest of John MacFarlane, pres- of the defunct American Life In- ice Company; Charles W. Dungan, ier of the defunct Bank of America. Louis E. Pfeiffer, president of the have been issued. They are fed with conspiring to obtain 8125.- )f the funds of the bank by credit- he loan to an etriploye of the bank idBicbardE. Banks. This is the step taken by the depositors to be- ritninal proceeding against the offt- of the Bank of America. Killed a Crossinj. LORADO SPRINGS, CoL, June 30. Cosgrove, of Chicago, and Mrs. of Newark, N. J-, were killed: GUI, of Chicago, had both legs en and Mrs. Wilson, of Chicago, leverely bruised yesterday, the car- i in which they were riding being by a Midland railroad train at Pass.' The driver and a young man npanying the ladies escaped injurj. ladies wore members of a party touring the State. f A Chapter June North L, Ssttrrday night westbound lit train oa tbe Pennsylvania road derailed awl eifht CMS were ked. The Pacific express ran into rrcct aad its eaftee raiasbed. !c delayed several hours. Mil- Hiltoa, a sectioa baad. was r a freUrht traia white poiaff to aad suvtaiaed fatal is taroefi ib-e of lie om city Horrible Deftth of a Young M a' from a ROCHESTER, N. Y., June Nicholas Karasinski, a young married man. aged twenty-one years, living at 812 North Clinton street, this city, met .with a fa- tal accident at Charlotte yesterday. Karasinski was on the four p. in. train coming back to the city after spending the day at the beach, and left the train at Charlotte station for the .purpose of assisting a friend named Mrs. Comer'to board, a steamer. He jumped from the train while it was in motion and slip- ping, fell and rolled under the wheels. He was brought to Rochester and taken to St. Mary's Hospital, where he died in a few minutes. He had a deep wound in the forehead, one leg was nearlv sev- ered and both legs were badly manjled. Karasinski leaves a widow. Prominent X.aTTjer Killed. N. Y., Juue Nelson A. Graves, one of the oldest members of the Monroe County bar and, a resident of this city, was killed on the .New York Central railroad a short distance from Penfield station on Saturday. He left his home in the morning and took a train for Fairport, intending to visit his daughter, Mrs. Frank Dougherty, who resides at that place. It is supposed that he left the train at Penfleld and started to walk down the track. He was struck by a light engine. Ended Hla Career with Strychnine. BALTIMORE, June A suicide attended by most distressing circum- stances occurred Saturday night at 029 North Fulton avenue, Henry Mende, a book-keeper, ended his life by swallow- ing twenty grains of strychnine. No cause for the suicide is apparent He leaves a widow and child. The coroner declined holding an inquest being sat- isfied that death was caused by poison taken with suicidal intent Drowned from BAtTiMor.E, June Robert Harvey, a fireman on the steamer Nessmore, now lying at Locust Point was drowned yesterday morniag from a yawl aside ol the steamer. Harvey and two of his shipmates had just started from their ship in a small boat in search of a place to bathe. The yawl gave a lurch, throw- ing Harvey over the side. He twenty years old, _ Tfrere Are MllltoM te It. FUASCISCO, June Colonel Almarez, of the American army, has reached San Diego from Juarez. Lowtt California, tells of a remarkable strike in the Juarez. He found gold ore rich that with a hand-mortar he got six pounds of gold- He that it is not a pocket, but there are millions in sight A IOWA CTTT, la., S. L. Cam- back. Jon of ex-OoTemor Cnmback. O Indiana, was found dead in his bed the St James Hotel Saturday .gTeaiaf. He was traveller for Boston aad had whick he drank to SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY JUNE 90. 1890. Miss- NINIM in FfcTOr of tke BIB To Reffviate Federal WlU 8sn It M M Both WASHINOTOX, June Herald, commenting on President Har- rison's attitude toward the Federal Elections bill, says: "President rison has heretofore (ivea tttf credit of at least deprecating, if not actually opposing, the passage of Federal Elections bill now under cassioii in the. House. But Saturday the President took occasion to deolanfr himself under the domination of the' Reed wing of the party and in favor of5 the bill. A gentleman who in the past has held very close official and personal rela- tions with the President, related the substance of an Interview between him and the Chief Magistrate to a Herald representative. It opened with a declaration by General Harrison that under no circumstances would he inter- fere, even by the remotest suggestion. outside 'of an official message, with the action of Congress. Then the dent continued: "If they pass the Fed-' era! Elections bill I will sign it as soon as it if presented to me for my atiOn. 1 want them to pass that bill and I don't care who knows it" Subsequently the President said he had, in a desultory way, advised nis friends in both houses of Congress to proceed as rapidly as possible with the final enactment of the bill, so that it might become K question of discussion in the coming campaign. A Bad Wreck. a disastrous head end collision on the the Pittsburg, Ft "Wayne A Chicago railroad Friday night, at the west end of Lucas Siding. Tbe thirl section of freight train No. 98, east-bound, had orders to take the siding for freight train No. 91. No. 91 was standing still waiting for No. 98 which thundered by the switch and collided with such "force as to demolish both engines -and eigh- teen cars of merchandise. The wreck- age took flre from the explosion of a gasoline tank, and nearly the it was consumed. The Joss will reach Good Hts J DAYTON, O., June Dietrick, a tinner by occupations twenty-six years old and married, committed suicide Sat- urday afternoon by taking aquaatiy of carbolic acid. Dietrick and his wife had not been living happily together. The latter returned Saturday from a three weeks' visit to her parents. She found her husband under the influence of liquor, when a quarrel ensued. It ended- by Dietrick saying was tired of life, and that he would commit suicide. He suited the action to the word by takr ing a vial of carbolic acid from his pocket and swallowing the contents. Poitmagter Threatened. With i.rnchlng. JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Jane master Morrison, of White. Springs, Hamilton County, has been arrested and is threatened with lynching. His wife has written to friends in Jackson- ville imploring assistance. Morrison had just returned from a visit to Wash- ington on matters pertaining to his ar- rest several week ago by pretended de- tectives whom he afterward prosecuted. This affair created a spirit of hatred and revenge toward Morrison and his life has been frequently threatened. Tiro Iteeorda HrokMV. CHICAGO, June thousand excited enthusiasts howled allegiance to the new monarch of the turf at Washing- ton Park Saturday afternoon when Racine beat the famous Ten Broeck's time for one mile and made the record Another record was broken in tbe Oakwood handicap, in which Teuton ran nine furlongs ia making tbe mile in Drowned at NIAGARA FAT.T.J, N. Y.. June body found in tbe river below the falls Saturday has been identified as that of Charles Oberst. assistant armorer of tbe Sixty-fifth regiment, aad who resided in Buffalo. Mrs. Oberst says bus- band left home on tbe morning of Juae 10 for tbe purpose of buying tone fish aad never returned. Oa that day a maa was to jump from Goat Island bridre. and second later pass aader the bridge. CHICAGO. June the Council and Omaha traia oa UK; ftock Island railway was Joliet. QL. Saturday iDorafag. coach, tbe cbatr car. pec aad iiaiag car took ancrtlxrr track aad Mrs. Annie a widow. Jsorris. aad Mrs. O. F. Tratt. of Joiiet A HOWLISG PARCB. tajared by tbe ef >U it ail of Jaae Dartof ftogteas of Sunday's hall fame Vetwasa (be WashiafftoB and Wowesser elaba at the Oeatlemea's Drivinf Park. Mar Alenuriria, Va., Sheriff Beaeh, of Alex- andria Couaty, aeeosBpaaied by JuaOoa of Peace Drummoad (colored) served warraats of arrest vpoa the maaafer aad members of die two teams tat piayiaf base ball in violation of the Sunday law. A trial, which developed into a complete faros followed, during whieh the spec- tators unmercifully guyed the justice aad sheriff. Each participant in the game was fined 91 and costs, amounting to 94, was promptly paid. The fame was then continued aad warrants were again made out against Secretary Bur- kett, of the 'Washington on the charge of playing ball without a license. JBurkett however, learned of this move and quickly drove to this city, with the sheriff in pursuit He will probably be arrested to-day to answer this charge. BASE BALL. KveaU AmoBf AMoehttbMt Brotherttowl Following are the scores of Saturday's games: NATIONAL LKAOtTE. At Chicago Brooklyn 4, Chicago At 9, Pittsburgh S. At New York 8, Cincin- nati 12. At Philadelphia 0, Cleve- land 5. PLATERS' LEAOPE. At Brooklyn 9, Cleveland At Boston ft. Chicago ten innings. At Philadelphia 8, Buffalo 4. At New York 4, Pitta- burgh 3. AXSAtCAIT ASSOCIATION. At Loaisville At Athletics 1, Toledo 8. At .Columbus Syracuse 5, Columbus 7. At St Rocherter 5, St Louis 10. 8U3TOAT GAMES. At Brooklyn 8, Louisville .0. AtSt St Louis 13. DEATH IN LEMONADE. Party of PoUoned by Drlnklnc the Three Children Dead. "WICHITA, Kan., June One hun- dred people were poisoned at a picnic Saturday by drinking lemonade. Three children who partooK of the beverage have died and others are not expected to live. A chemical analysis of the lemonade has not been made, but It is said that the man who supplied it used chemical made a mistake in his drugs. The beverage was supplied in. huge cans and as the day was very hot everybody drank freely. Soon sev- eral persons were taken violently ill. Before long almost, every person on the grounds was prostrated and before medi- cal aid reached them three children had died. Found by Track Walker. PrfArrsBCKott, N. Y., June The body of .Edmund J. Hanker, aged twenty-eight an employe of the Bluff Point quarry at Saranac was found on the Delaware 4 Hudson track near here Sunday 'morning by track walker O'Shea. Banker was here Satur- day and indulged in liquor. supposing that the law required the body to be left where it was found, let it remain on the track, while he came here to notify the coroner. Before tbe coroner reached the body several trains had passed over it, mangling it horribly. Popularity That ST. June The 'popular clerks, elected by the Chronicle's readers left for Europe yesterday. They are Miss Conley, Mrs. Hess, Mr. O'Hanlon and Mr. Thomas. Mrs. Hess was to have taken an American tour at the Chronicle's expense, but her employers, recognizing her long and faithful Serv- ices, made up the difference in expense between tbe two tours and Mrs. Hess will go to Europe. The party will be joined at Cincinnati by three popular teachers, who go abroad at the expense of tbe Cincinnati Post Caargvtf wttk Wife. Pa., June John Kamp- fer, a railroad employe at Huotodale, has been arrested, charged with the uu.-der of his wife, who died Thursday, shortly after he bad given her what he said was pain killer. Mrs. Kampfer's brother instigated tbe against the prisoner aad be has pro- sured evidence from neighbors that Kampfer bad treated his wife badly aad threatened to put her out of tbe way. Mrs. Kampfer's body will be exb tuned aadaa iaqaestheU. Jaae Decker. skull waa fractured by early Tharnday moraiajr. died Swaday afteratwa after ta aa for hoars. Mrs. AJOTK, JB megro, was shot raiaff JvM above town by disffaised aad eaue into town for aMdieml Soon after then was a slmnl- into town from every, toad ol armed men oa horseUok, nam- bvrlng about 200. Howard was toi ml in Tom Sewell's fardaa. refused to snrrender and was killed. Two of the horses of the party were wounded by shota from the garden, aad two other Jake Ransom and Tod Flan- wounded at the same time. Tillis was found and he, with two other bad negroes, was taken to the outskirts of the corporation, whipped and ordered to leave. Armed squads were then sent out and captured the arms of the 'colored people. Eighteen or twenty double-barreled guns, two Winchester rifles and a number of pistols taken. The crowd then dispersed. PtAYJSO JNBAD LUCK. A. CAttfotttn. Robbed of Their ta London. KotuVn to Annrloa NEW YORK, June 30. Four cattleu'dp, who were robbed of their wages in Lon- don by a boss cattleman, arrived here Sunday stowaways on the steamship City of Chester. They were Pat Quinn, William Harrington, John Doyle and Joseph Benton. The men had crossed on the tramp steamer Waverly, from Baltimore. When they reached ten- don the boss- cattleman collected their wages and fled. They were obliged to pawn their clothes to reach Liverpool, and there they stowed themselves away on the City of Chester. They remained in the hold four days without food or water. On the fifth day they came on deck and told the chief officer their story. Bentoo claims to be an old govern- ment scout, and said he served fourteen years under General Terry, and was with Terry on the Caster battle field on the Little Big Horn after the massacre. RESCUED FROM DEATH. Eighteen luiv-xooed .In Shaft Jluve Wonderful June 30. The build- ings of the Mbnmouth Sower Pipe :Com- pany were destroyed by fire Saturday. The fife originated at the bottom of a shaft 100 feet deep. The flames in- stantly flew up the walls and ignited the building covering the shaft Three dynamite torpedoes then exploded, throwing the fire over a large barn tha.t was filled with hay. j The heat waa so intense that the Are- men could not approach the shaft which led to the mines below, where eighteen men were imprisoned. Nearly two hours elapsed before the mon could be reached. They were prostrated when brought but s were, soon revived. The men only saved themselves by ly- ing down and holding their faces to the ground. Package" HOIUM Booming, I1L, June An "original package" house has been opened up in this city. All sorts of li- quors are retailed in all sizes of bottles, each and every bottle being ragarded'as an "original package." It is reported that wholesale liquor houses have offered a month and guaranteed immunity to any man who will open an "original package" establishment in Macomb. A former saloon-keeper of Eeoknk, backed by a St Louis liquor bouse, is preparing to open "original package" houses in interior Illinois towns. __ _ Tttravereln Cootentf. ATLANTIC CITT, N. J., June 30. Philadelphia district of the North Amer- ican Union, composed of societies of the Tomverein in Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey, are holding their fif- teenth annual athletic and gymnastic festival in this city. The festival will last until July 3. Sunday was spent in individual contests and class drills, and about 800 scooters from the different societies contested for the prizes, which will be awarded this evening. WASHTJOTOX, Jane Ewart, of South Carolina, a Republican, created a sensation in the Hvuse of Repre- sentatives on Saturday during tbe de- bate oa tbe Federal Elections bill. He that elections in his State were as pare as those in Massachusetts, and de- clared that the passage of the bill would toad to bloodshed ia tbe South. Hisrs- were applauded by tbr> Democrats aad created a decided impressioa oa all XeV. Fiuyeratd, tbe Irish XatJoaal League of America, rewired a dispatch Satur- day fros9 Charles Stewart Paraell. ta whitfe as says that aad have tbe ooaaUeratioa are the vpiai that asMifvl rcstslt wvaMl follow aatioaal of tke of of places along the Hudson river lows: Pouffhkeepsie, KiajOsm. 82.800; Newlrargb, tt.000. There were eighteen deaths eighty-five prostrations from the test ia Chicago on the 28th. Many of them prostrated are in a critical condition. The Algerian and Tunisian oficJafe have forbidden the annual to Mecca from their territory at taia time. The presence of cholera Arabia is the cause of the the edicts. At Brunswick, 5Ie the other nlf John C. Wheeler died from hydrophobia. He was bitten by a doy some weeks Two ether men were bitten by the sams> dog, and will be sent to tlue Pastaar Institute in New York. The Comptroller of the Currency declared a third dividend, ccaft. in favor of the creditors of the bank, of Cincinnati. Tins makes in forty-five per cent on claims amounting to The official census of- the leading cities of Texas discloses the figures appmximacely. Dallas, San Antonio, Sb.'JOO. Galveston, 35.0H, Fort -Worth, 31.030; Houston, Waco, Austin. The Mexican has. tracted: with Chinese ageats to seat Chinese laborers to work upon a proposed railroad to constructed between the City and Matatlan, on iae west coast miters and (VLaughlin. the A cans sentenced respectively to be and to ten years' imprisonment, been allowed an appeal to the Supresak Court State of Chihuahua, Mezieav They are confined in the military bscs racks at Paso Del Norte. At a recent meeting of the Secretary Blaine's reciprocity proposi- tion was the subject of ttiicusslo.i. With the exception of Secretary Windom, thb agreed with the views eatar- tained by Mr. Blaine. The Preaidarit did not offer any argument against tto proposition. TWOCENTS> wall paper 4SS to 497 West Thirteeath street, York, was damaged hf recently. Unofficial figures put the A Fatal CoilUiou. BETH'LBKKV, Pa June 30. nortlr- bound passenger train on the Norfk Peansylvania railroad was run into ay s> fast freight while staiiding at Center miles south of -here, day Mrs. Bassington, 'itL Say re, Pa. was probably fatally injures, Mrs. H. Kubo, of was MftV about the bend and body." 0 THE MARKETS Flonr. Ormln and FvovMosv New YORK, June Ctoaed percent Exchange steady. Posted rates 'actual rates 484V4 (or sixty and 488 for de- mand. Government bonds steady. Currency to at lifc .48, at 12814 do at 102. Ci-EVKi-AKD, June FLGVK Couofeg made lit Minnesota patent at KkOft S.75, Minnesota Spring at No. 8 red at 80o, No. 3 red at afc" HigQ mixed at 3Bc, western yellow 4fe 40c. No. a mixed at33c, Ko., 3 white at No. l mixed at Fancy creamery at I8c, dairy LSv New York at He. lOo. Strictly tresli at 15c. BurbanXs at per NEW YORK. JULB Quiet Ml flrm. Minnesota extra W.Stas.OO, city OJB at tL3Sa4.50, One at Steady. No. 8 wiateratWe, 4s Jane atttttc, do July atWHo.deAacuststtlMa GoKS-No. Smixed at tie, do June at 41 SB July at 41 He. No. a mixed at 34c, Jane at 33X0, M era at I13.S03U.OO. July at 8J.S6, Aogurt at H.ot Weitern creamery ttoej at'Ma. flat, common to sood, WetWirn (reshat HHc. June SB.- ugust a August at September at POBK-July at at July at at RiBS-July at yAUa-ust at Toucuo, Dull aad Cwh at Jnly Wtfc. Active and arm. Caeb at 33c Cash CHICAGO June Market Beerea at AoekenaaJ fi- (mils and mixed at Stow aad a shade lower. Mixed a? at TeiaM M Sneer AJTD acttta. an lamwh   

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