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Salem Daily News: Friday, June 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 27, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE DAILY NEWS. L. EL NO. 151. WORLD'S Fit SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY JUNE 27. 1890. TWO CENTS. Commtmtoit fttChleaco. te Site, GurMtoe 1.4 Selection to W Dtteriitiwd. Tendered the SHOT TUB KOBBEttS. BeUt Jaae_87. The National ta ooaaectloa with the I'umbiaa Exposition was In- yeaterday. From an early and corridors of the toteU presented an appear- to thoie who have partici- e national conventions of the leal parties. On every hand intend, men of national prom- lusinesa life, in the political in the arenas of statestnan- .plomaoy. The Grand Pacific the principal center of the air delegates, and by ten spacious rotunda was almost k. Each one of the States and i was represented by two del- i the ten delegates-at-large by President Harrison all put araiice. At noon -the National n was formally opened in the room of the Grand Pacific. Harris, of Virginia, was iporary chairman; R. R. Price, temporary secretary and W. assistant secretary. Mr. Mc- Eentucky, submitted a reso- ridiag for the appointment of of twelve on permanent or- to report the name of a secretary and as many vice as the committee deemed fit ipposed on the ground'that it to elect the president in open After being amended to pro- the committee recommend >rs and committees should be and that they should then be rn meeting, the resolution ir then announced the follow- ittee on permanent organiza- enzie, of Kentucky; Smalley, a; Ewing, of Illinois; McDon- ftlifornia; Cochrane, of Texas; E Missouri: Widener, of Penn- Goodell, cf Colo-ado; Breshn, York; Martindale, of Texas; of Minnesota; Keogh, ot olina. The commission then until this morning, e question of the sufficiency fund there will be no of'opinion. If in the judg- the National Commission the ubscrlbed is not regarded as all purposes, the board of di- ll guarantee to secure without nany millions more as may be The probable officers of the Commission came in for a good nvassing yesterday. Ex-Sen- ner, of Michigan, seems to be f'a candidate for president York delegates have publicly i their intention of placing w in nomination, but in view st which require his I attention, it is not thought that he would conscit to oc- position. For secretary, ener- rts have been put forth on be- on. BenjaminButterworth and Dickinson, of Texas, and the a the lead. net was given to the 104 corn- 's at the Palmer House last 'he affair was an elaborate one r select, the number of the ing limited. Outside of those i permitted w pay 515 per plate participation, the only guests the commiasumert were Chief ttller, Justice Harlan, Governor L CrWkrr. peaken iaclnded ex-Minister Benry Exall, of Texas: Thomas ode. Mark McDonald, of Cali- H. Jones, of the St ypablfc, aad ex-Governor Bul- faasachnsetts. t SAX ASTOXIO, Tex., June have made a maraud! agexpe- Ution agaiast Mexico, one above aad the other below Laredo, Tbe band above were so hotiy pursued on United eatl by United neat from Fort Mclatosh that they crossed over into Mexico before they intended to and fell into the -hands of Mexican cavalry. In tue short fight which en- wed Santiago Sandoval. one ot the leaders, and several ot the filibusters were wounded. Soon after their capture another of the leaders was summarily shot, and it is reported that on Wednes- day evening, after a brief military trial, the other members of the party were taken to a ravine back of Xeuvo Laredo and shot by their captors. The second expedition crossed to Guerrero, two miles below Laredo, where they robbed the custom house and several stores. During their attack on the town one of their leaders wero killed, and shortly afterward the ma jorlty of the band captured, but what was done with them is a mystery. The Mexican auvhomies are studiously silent. Allot the unaders were Mex- ican citizens, their object being plunder RACE WAB RENEWED. Old Feud Between Out n- Wounded. Mhltcg and Dlacki Klgiit of the Forme Debate ifctfee the Bill Fraau MA of ItttoMX From OF TUB G. A. R. COLUMBIA, S. C., June i trouble between the races near Bam berg, Barnwell County. On Saturday none negroes went fishing in a boa owned by a white man, after they hat been ordered not to use it When th negroes returned they were set upon b. the whites and beaten. In the fight white man was severely injured. Tues- day night Robert Kearse and a numbei of friends went to the house of the ne gro who appeared to be the leader ol the party. The negroes were in am bush near the houws and fired on the whites, wounding eisjht of dangerously The negroes then fled, It is feared there will be more trouble over the matter. Jnne TIM B pMsed the toUowiac Anther- eonstrucUoa of MissiMtppl rixer Wlnotta, Minn.: graatiBff flfreen leave to la Ant leoond post-offlem. Debate on the Etoctkm bill. Mr. Lodge said subject waa crave And manded serious anddeUberktlretreMineat. desired to trent the qoentton The proposed bill extended the election ot members so tnat they wooM be effective tbrounhout the United States when- ever the people wanted ttt m no extended. He said that no local machinery was to be dis- turbed and thai ballots were to be cast as at present and no secret ballot system was to interfered u ith -where it BOW prevailed. The acts uhich it was propobed to extend had been called into existence by the ftautto frauds In the city ol New York to and r the power of Congress to this law, or of he necessity of using that power. The number was increasing of those who believed Mr Oleve and Discounted in six He beUeved ae black vote was suppressed in the South and t -ras the expressed Intent on of the men who contro led that section that the suppression Should continue. Mr Peel, of Arkansas, and Mr. Lewis, of Mississippi, both declared that ttett Was no charge of fraud I" their il.stricts Mi-. .Wheeler, ol Alabama and Mr Crisp, of ng for their States, denied Mr.f Rowell's charges Mr asksd Mr rtowvH to ac couat.'orthe silence of forty per cent, ot the vote of Maine and Mass.tchusetts. Mr RuweU replied that it was not in a Presl- denMalyear Mr Breckeundge and Mr Rowell had a rate over the clrcumstanoeB of the former's ilection. during which Mr. McRae of Arkansaa, admitted that armed men rode about the poll ing places in that State in Powell Clayton's time but said there had been better times since. Without Anal action on the bill toe Houae ad- lourned. SEN The resolution offered Thursday by Mr Call directing the Secretary of the Senate to prepare a table showing the number of bills introduced by each Senator and the number of them passed was laid on the table. The House bill for the admission of Wyoming as a State was taken up and Mr. Jones, of Ar- kansas, addressed the Senate He declared himself in favor of admission ot Wyoming, and of all the other Territories eftcept Utah, when the; hod sufficient population and suffl clent wcaltbto justify their assumption of State government. Mr Reagan opposed tbe bill alleging among his reasons for doing so the provision for wo- man suffrage contained in the Wyoming consti- tution. In replying to a question by Mr. Blair, Mr Reagan said that he knew that the Senator from New Hampshire had great reaped for long haired men and short haired women. He could not say that he (Mr. Reagan) had. The day when the floodgates of female suffrage reached the country the social organization would have reached the point where decay and ruin began. At the close of Mr. Reazmn's areech It WM found to be impossible to get a voting quorum and understanding waa reached that vote on the bill and amendments wouul begiu at four o'clock to day. The Senate )oiBt resolution to continue the unexpended balance for the tree delivery ice ot the Postofflce DepartoMnt (IWt.tiB) up to June 30, tor pay for extra service ot letter was reported and pawed. of conference were appointed on the FoetoAea Appropriation bill and on the Consular and Dip- lomatic Appropriation bflL The following were taken from the cal- endar and passed: Senate bill for the relief of certain on the retired list of the army- tor their nomination aod appointment to the rank to which they were entitled M the time they were placed on the retired Senate bill to aid tbe Stateof South Dakcta to school of mines (donating fifty per ecat. cf the money received from Vtt sale of mineral not to exceed til "00 a nor to exceed the amount contributed by the State.) Adjourned. _ rmm. Jane It. IV. Uajrfim. ot tnm tbe wia- nmttmvt vemawcariJy "wta we of Hqaer and Hta broken _ Mass.. Jcne 57.- ian Allison has Kafeccd x> of a Mas JUved la for WoosTER, O.. June Richard Banjrbman, tho Dalton maa who eight jean ago accidentally swallowed a plate containing four false teeth, and which has remained in his stomach ever since, died Wednesday. Since the unfortunate ocevrrence he has only been able to take the greatest effort, and for the laivfour yaars has subsisted entirely on Uqntda. From a stoat, hearty man he to be skeleton, so weak ai that he was barely able to or walk. Many eminent physi- elaM treated him and tried to devise means by whioh the plate could be removed successfully. Others worked ta Tain to compound a mixture that would dissolve the substance and not destroy CHARGED WITH MURDER. Ken Who a Pat Bcalad Ban. McAKtmrk, O., June Dunn and Shirel Collins, residing near Hope Furnace, this county, have been ar- rested on tbe affidavit of J. D. Crist, cor- oner of this county, charging them with murder in the seoond degree. They were taken before Justice Redd, who placed them in jail until July 1 for a preliminary trial On June 1 Miss Ella A. Friend, aged twenty, was brutally as- saulted, and had been sick since the oc- currence from the ill treatment anddied last Sunday. The coroner held a post- mortem examination and caused the ar- rests. The men had been in hiding un- til Wednesday, when Detective Shipley Captured them. A Qaevtloa of Endurance. June barber arrested for AMLKT, Mieh., Jaae stave mill at North Star waa wrecked Wedaeeday afternoon by a boiler explo- aloa. Foar saea were killed outright aad a fifth so badly Injured that he died yesterday morniag, while a number of were seriously hurt. The lift of killed Fred Tucker, Charles Browa, Hiram Costello, ot Greea Bay. Wisconsin; Frank Gar- diaer. The injured are: J. Brittoa, injured aternally aad skull fractured, will probably die; D, Brltton, skull fractured, will probably die; William Erb, badly cut about the head; J. Hull, broken arm aad internally injured; William Rody, Ctssluc Conkllng and James Brown. The mill at once took fire and it was only by the greatest eflorts that the bodies of the killed and wounded wero taken from the wreck. Tbe mill is a total wreck, everything being burned, including the stock and cars loaded trith headings. CASTA WA Y8RESC UED. No Compromise Between mea Md Of the Central Otkcr May te late the Ttemp. The U violating the law against Sunday labor, was in police court yesterday and fined K and costs upon a plea of guilty. That is the maximum penalty and the em- ploying barbers have decided to pay the fine and keep open instead of employing attorneys. Sunday shaves have been advanced to fifteen cento ia all whose proprietors ace members of the combination and the contest has sim- mered down to one ot endurance. Injunction Granted In a Divorce Salt. YoiUfOSTOwif, 0., June Car- oline Leonard has commenced suit in oourt against her husband, Louis L, Leopard, a prominent and wealthy farmer, asking for divorce and alimony. The couple have been married twenty- three years, tbe plaintiff charging Leon- ard with extreme cruelty and marital misconduct with Miss Belle SuMon. An Injunction been issued restraining Leonard from disposing ot Cr< w of Ten Men to a Wrecked Vessel Picked Cp .After Living Five Weeks Island. New YORK, June. 37. schooner J. N Stearns, from Nova Scotia, brought into this port yesterday the ship- wrecked crew, numbering ten men, ot the Scotch brig Jennie, which was lost off Sable Island, on the coast of Nova Scotia, on April 33, while on a voyage from Falmouth to Boston. On the night of April 83 the Jennie was stranded on an island, a desolate strip of uninhabi- ted land, off Sable Island. Mate Donald Cox and two men were lost while endeavoring to make land in a small boat. The 'captain, James Mo- Donald, and the rest ot the crew after- reached the land, built a rude hut and lived on the island for five weeks, subsisting on sea gulls' egrs mi fish. Then they began cruising in the boat in the hope of being picked up. Alter two the Stearns came along and brought them here. BA8EBAJLJT Association and Broth- erhood Fields. Following are the Scores of games: NATIONAL LKAOUE. At s, Cleve- land 4. At Pittsburgh 0. At York 5, Cincin- nati 8. At 5, Chicago 11. AMKRICAK ASSOCIATION. At a, Athlet- ics 9. At S. Syracuse 4. At St. 0, St Louis 8. At 8, Toledo a PLAYERS' LEAGUE. 3, Cleveland 7. At 30, Buffalo 13. At York 10, Pitts- burgh 9. At 0, Chicago 10. A BOLD CRIME. PstrBiMter Hold Cp In HU OttVsv bjr Masked Bobber and Believed or CMM What TTi j TratM Cairo acktxt. CHICAGO, June- conference between the officials of the Illinois Cen- tral railroad and the strikers' committee lasted until six o'clock Thursday after- noon. The final answer of the c ompaar was to the effect that they would notbe justified in removing Mr. Russell his .position. The strikers' reported at once at their and last evening a big meeting of strik- ers was held. Nearly 400 were in At- tendance The meeting was secret and its import and results could only aa gleaned from statements secucod alter Its close From the street frequent and hearty applause could be heard, and it was evident that the report of thd com- mittee and the speeches made wore -ap- proved. Tho matter of final settlement was held in abeyance, however, until this when a meeting wall be held at nme o'clock. The strikers show no signs ot weakenin? and unle-ts some compromise can be effected to-day noth- ing can prevent the strike spreading. Several committees from other waited on the Illinois Central yesterday to assure them ot hearty ear operation in case there should be aaf necessity for a general tie-up. One mittee came from the Wabash road aadl complained that there was an obnoziooa superintendent in the employ of that company that the men would probably take steps to have removed soon at the Illinois Central strike was settled. Another committee came from the Caire division ot the Illinois Central, and the leader of it entered a complaint againdk Superintendent fiartigan, who, he said, was no better than Russell. CAIMO, 11L, June 37. A committee ot, the strikers came here Thursday and: oa their order every freight train be- tween here and Centralia on the Illi- nois Central road was side-traoked. The passenger coaches were detached from" two trains and local roads wero notified not to handle Central cars other lines. Mrs, itardiacr. secured oalj the BOSTON, June building labor- ers will not accent tbe wages offered by the Building Association, bold- ing that tbe excavators as well hod men should have an hour, in- stead of only 42 as offered. Of tbe mea who originally struck, there are now but 419 on strike. Tbeir officers assert that the others, whether excavators ot hod carriers, have ob- saln-d the 25 cent ner boar dewtaaded. BAT. S. Y.. June Aaotber record lowered oa tbe j Bay track yWerday. Fireati O.. June third-aaa- rtoa of Oraad of Pytoiaa, colored, cloeed Wedneeday eveniag with a banquet. Thursday a street parade of took place, followed by a picnic at tbe fair grouada, with competitive aad feaeral festivities The aext of the Grand Lodge will be held at Porta- utn, Jaae, DUNBAR MINB Tkrvws) f e. fanae. Oucxs PAULS. N. Y.. June Thurs- day morning a nasscnfer train to Lake George wreaked at Glea Lake, five north of here. Three were thrown into tbe lake, iaeladias: one passenger coach and tbe smoker. About traia. ypbody was injured. CAJMZ, O.. June W. L. Ovav Pbllntelabia loads, that ty. Pa., June noon Thursday paymaster Atkinson, of the Wynn Coke Works, was seated alone in the company's office, counting the Money to pay the employes. Atkinson had just placed the money, in envelopes, when suddenly a masked covered him with a revolver and ordered him to throw up hands. Atkinson run out ot the office and gave an alarm. robber veined the money and fled. A party gave chase. The robber turned and fired several shots at his pursuers. The yard hit the thief with a stone, causing him to drop bat and part ol the money. He recognized aa Perry Doaaldaon, a former employe ot the company. A poate U searching for him. _______________ tatt Flecked. Crrr. Minn.. June hanged here early Thurs- day moraine for tbe murder of Mr. aad The execution firat ia Pine Coaaty aad the sscoad under the law which provides that the execution maat take place between mld- aiffbt and Marine, without tbe pretence of TV? condemned maa was unattended bv clergy, aa be had faetly refaevd all That irata of the Im Will be Known Bzelte at Fever Heat. DOSBAB, Pa., June Tho tension here is absolutely painful. The people are without hope of finding their friend! and comrades alive, but they are firm la the belief that before morning the undertakers awaiting near by will have been placed in charge of the twen- ty-nine dead bodies. The of tbe Dunbar Furnace Company and -the mine inspectors are making every effort te avoid another disaster when the divid- ing wall is broken through. It is prob- able that Inspector Keighley will take charge at the supreme moment Be will have with him but one man. For two days twenty men been cutting a tunnel from the Ferguson mine to the Hill Farm mine from an- other direction than at work in tbe Mahoning mine. Their intentions have been kept very quiet, their plaa very dangerous. At ton o'clock last niirbt they reached within two feet of the Hill Farm mine and were stopped by the authorities. Testing were taken into tbe tunnel, a drill forced through Into tbe mine and a bag of ait from the Hill Farm mine was taken out for testing. The result of the examina- tion of the not made public. The work stopped, however, and farther effort at reacae will be made from that direction. At two o'clock morning another shift of men taken into the Those who came out say they are within a few feet of the burning mine. They will be in tue Bill Farm mine before ten o'clock to-day, bet it will require at least three to test tbe air. running tbe mile and a half usual. tbe rwnntna-. M- as M _ BaW ia tbe Jaw 1 tatioaof Oae W. Vs.. June Lest a train on tbe railroad struck ani UDe4 two named May. seven years. Tbefonfrw on tbe track GaUinolis. tbeir made tranrtie to stop, but cosWl not. Oarasmn Wta n Kcw Conn.. Jane Cornell University crew won tbeir with tbe University of I'cSMylveato crew yesterday bj six Icactbs, over s three-mile course, ia tbe fast tiaM fourteen minutes and forty-five i The race was very uniaiarastbmg tbe fint half mile, tbe Pennsylvania oyfta4uallT instantly aged re Hitting to Cornell kept inmealar beriead. ac. Kerx, of tbe Jane Irm of tbe OnciaMtnl Iliitlj.   

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