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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 26, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 26, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY JtjNE2fc 1890. TWO CENTS. tar Governor lift Seeoid Bailee fcs-, Long be- jlock Wednesday, the Republican -Stats convention sailed to order, crowds began h front of the Opera BOOM the doors were opened a rash [or, the galleries, which were d to, suffocation. The dele- ft slow in taking their seats ocnslderably after; ten o'clock main Andrews called the oon- i order. After the roll call F.Ftelwr, of Philadelphia t the Berks County contesting be admitted with a half vots Lirman Andrews finally set- rnatter by declaring that a organization should be at ields, of Philadelphia, noml- 8v Graham .'for temporary He waft elected unanimously. ng introduced by Chairman Mr. Graham was greeted with usiaanv' Mr Qrabaarr thanked ition the honor conferred and at the conclusion of ie temporary organization was as follows: Secretary, Frank assistant secretaries, John M, Charles F.'Ettla, Seymour ommittees, on contested teats, t organisation and on resolu- appointed and at the i took a receaa. tentidn oonvened at p. ir Ey on, Of Allegheny, waa maneht chairman. Be ad- convention at 'some length conclusion of his speech a re- hour was taken. When the i was called to order at chairman of the committee ions, took the stage and read follows, and it was sly itbe Republicans of th9 Common- onnsylranla. In assem- rraterual to their part? rouEljouX tne nation and ebngratu- .ourselves upon the victory woo ife ptir.ty of Republican principles rlolitua o( Republican ciiUenjibip. ,irman of out National Committee, feel a laatinr of gratitude. ccgj aemccgjn -the last Pne den pi. commend .sis bearing under ich successful leadership of our urcharifcl for nlm. Aa a citizen, a lha as Secretary Donwealth under two auccesitve ad- is. as State treasurer by the over ullrage of his fellow citizens, and as the United Suites, he bus wou and respect and confidence. tlly endorse the administration of larrison and declare that its wise m. iti? undoubted integrity aul its Icleocy deserve the unqtiallified ap- ,he whole, nation. We gratefully ontioued eonUdence of the Repub- onavlvania in the wisdom, integrity lansUp of Hon. J. Donald Cameron. Senator at Washington, so emphat- In his past services. so we ac- positive aiuuranot of btt fattbful- Iciency In the future. end the course of Hon. Thomas B. ker.ot the National House of Repre- In manfully preventing the obttruo- latlon and the of public time and we tender htm the conifratuU- thaaks of. Republican party of .la. as our gratification with the admin- Governor James S. Beaver and con- im upon the fact that his course has d by wbktom. Integrity and that dc- welfare of all the people which to.tfee Mtran and of State la all coming rears. g with the STMipathy and the doty e make the following declaration of or the betterment of political gov- d the beneOt of 'our fellow eitiiens-: re that every .lawful voter the it a ballot at every public elec ve it properly counted and certified; npoa to adopt snrb legls- 11 prevent a suppression or falalfle- votea of oar teuow ottlzraa at elec- Bees national aod ollOcal atavwry tfcfongboat the ua >mraal tacrsase of var population r commerce, torelfn aad do; create >o ttetr rircujatioa of our Sa- to kapofativety ral good, ia oar judgment, ttat ttiers and In f of the ooaatry. tTacovpromistag- whether gold or rameatlv tuvvriaa; UM owe of both the BepabOaaa party of Pwwiyl- ads eaamaocat by tae Congreat toa of aaoh will. .falieat. tne of silver aamoaey. alt aad matatala a panty be k-o tor toe wetfare ot tbow who opoo battle carried triuopbaotly if Republicaa faitk trill cad oa'.y Mt loyal soktKr ot the Civil Wa: eatered taio aoaorrd reA and trreas to graat a per Atem lerrioc everv Unfea 'Oldler aad wtilov wfeo was koaoraWy Called i of the KwSrt our aaoa t tor TOiaMmraemcat far Ux aa a to M: ttla to Uchtea the burden aad aa esoaUastaxasioe. TB that aad wa aadotnoidlBf the ._1 thereby there should y oir surplus revenue, we fust and equitable Increase IB the taxa- BOB of property of eorporatiom. wereeommena that the local sjstem of taxa- reformed a. to permit the Uxattoa capital for local purposes to snch aa exteataa to enable tae local authorities to of Ooeral Assembly vigi- making appropr the publie ?.of Iiwiltntlons re- tate aid the strictest economy in the The chairman then announced that the placing of candidates in nomination for Governor was next in order. Colonel John C. Carter, of Erie, in an eloquent speech, nominated Delamater for Gov- ernor. Adjutant General Hastings was nominated by George W. Orlady. The mention of Hastings' name caused pro- longed cheering. W. L Shaffer, of Del- aware County, seconded Hastings' nomi- nation. W. Rice nominated Secretary State Charles W. Stone for Governor. He said that Stone could carry the State by majority, 'ho matter who was put up by the Democrats. The party would have an able bodied man. not a wounded man, with him as the leader. Emerson Collins, of Ljcoming, nom- inated H. C. McCormick. Balloting then began, The first ballot stood: Delameter 83, Hastings 89, Montooth SO, Stone 15, Osborae 8, McCormick S. The second ballot-was: Delamater Hastings 69, Montooth 90, Stone as- borne 5, McCormick 3. Before the re- sult was announced George B. Graham, of Philadelphia, began the stampede to Delamater by changing his vote from Hastings. Others followed his example and the vote as finally announced was: Delamater 105, Hastings 59, Montooth 19, Stone 15. Osborne 4. McCormick 3. f William Elynn, of Allegheny County, moved to make Delamator's nomination unanimous. The motion was declared carried, though some noes were heard. The convention then took a recess until evening. During the recess it learned that Major Montooth positively declined sec- ond place on the ticket. This itffi the choice between Louis A. Watres and E. K. Martin. It was soon determined that Watres would be the man. When the convention reassembled Martin was put -in nomination, by Prof; Lyte, of Lancaster, who referred eloquently to his candidate's military and civic record. Mr. Warren, of Lacka wanna, nominated Senator Watres. S. E. Covin, of Phila- delphia, nominated J. A. Passmore, who he said deserved the opportunity to go before the people for a vindication. Mr. Brown, of Schuylkill, seconded Pass- m ore's nomination. The roll was then called. .Before it had proceeded far the. fact was apparent that Watres would win, and Mr. Brown withdrew Pass- more's name. The ballot resulted: Watres 195, Martin 36. Watres' nomi- nation was made' unanimous. W. R. Leeds, of Philadelphia, moved and Mr. Foster, of Allegheny, seconded, that Thomas J. Stewart be renominated by acclamation for Secretary of Inter- nal Affairs. This was carried with a hurrah. It was then announced that the only remaining business was the'. election of a chairman of the State Committee. W. H. Andrews, of Craw- ford. the present chairman, nominated General D. H. Hastings for the place. General Hastings was chosen without an Opposing vote. A recess was taken to allow time for the to be notified. Presently the committee on notification appeared with Mr. Delamater, who was vocifer- ously cheered. Be made a speech thank- ing the convention end accepting the nomination. Major McCauley. of West Chester, here entered the hall and said that there seemed to be a misunder- standing about the election of General Bastings. He had just been authorised by Bastings to say tnatthe latter would not under any circumstances accept the chairmanship of the State Committee. Senator Delamater again consulted the chairman. A few eiapaed and J. J- Carter, who aowtnawd Dela- asater. row and aaM: "As we to be assured that General Bastings will not accept the State chairmanship. I renosinate W. H, Andrews for that po- aitioa." The motion was carried adjoaraed. The yesterday adopted the cenfofeoee report tk4 Naval Appropriation MIL- Daaate tke ver Mi was exteadad from two aa4O o'clock. Mr. ad ftroeaed the la the' ia to tae the aeaata MB as a sew outbreak el the flat money or greenback erase which bad over tbe country fone ago. Mr, Taylor, ot Uliaokv oppoaed the bill aad charged that 'it was pushed.by the moat disgraceful ever la the Capital. Hardly a coraer outaMeoi the hall ot could be turned without rnaalnir of them. He was for a- measure tbatwoaM bring the two metals together in tav.shorteev possible time and that would Jake product of this country. It seemed to hint that the Houae bill should aaUafy.the allver men. Mr. Cutcneon. ot Michigan, aald would vote to non-eonenr. Be believed the bill could aad would be improved m conference. coinage the rains ot every .worldngmaa'swafiM would be scaled down. The only peopto who would be benefited would be -the big corpora- who could pay of. In depredated curreacr. Mr. vrniiams, of charged that the President had seat men here threatening a veto tt a free Wll was passed.' Messrs. Barao and Broslus, of Pennsylvania, opposed the Senate bill. K Mr. McKlnl.yta closing tae debate aald that tbe question of to-day was whether tbe nnaociaJ system ot the couatry should.be He oppoaed the Senate wanted both gold and aUvw-uewt aadrwaalad them to be equal in purobMtttK aad UffSl tsadet quality. hoar of three o'clock arrived as4 the Speaker declared the previous ooMttva or- dered. A separate vote was taken tioh of snbnltutwr' for the first section of the' House bill first section pi the Senate bill, which provides for tree eviuage, Seaaw amendment waa All the other amendments were disagreed to, a separate vote being taken, only on the fourtlL On motion of Mr. Conger It was ordered a conference committee be appointed. The conference report on tit Diplomatic and Consular Appropriation bill was: presented and agreed to. Mr. Cannon, from the Committee on Boles, reported an .order providing Houae consider the National Election .bill begluninc with the passage of the Silver Wa the vtettoas quest1onto.be ordered Julys, that during the last two days amendments may otter In the. House with debate under the aye-minute rule, this rule not to interfere with'appropriation Mr. McMillln attacked the bill, charging that those who proposed it were tired of being elec- ted by the people and. .wanted to be elected by the Ckivernment. Mr. Blount. of Georjla. said the propositiona in the bill were monstrous and degrading. Dtrr- injr a controversy with M r. MoMUJln, Mr. Can- non said that the election law was in opera- tion In New York City. Messrs. flower.'Belden aad Cummings tried to and toe-re much confusion. Mr. O'Neal, of Indiaaa, iptimated that there had been frauds in Mr. Cunnon's district and asked if the blU would prevent the buying Of votes there. Mr. Cannon denied the charge, saying that the gentleman demonstrated to tbe country that he in his a'ccuaatious and his tongue was not a slander to any man on or off: the floor. Mr. .to reply against tbe Speaker's gavel and it was necessary finally for the sergeant-at-urmsto briny forward the.fnsat mace to restore order. A motion of Mr. Spring- er to table the resolution was lost. The resolu- tion of tbe Committee on Rules was then agreed to. Adjourned. following bills were taken from the calendar and passed: House bill increasing by the limit of cost of a public building at Springfield Mo.; House bill authorizing the erection of a hotel for colored people upon the Government reservation at Fortress Monroe. Mr. Call rose to address the Senate on the jcet of resolutions'heretofore offered by him (and reported back adversely from the Com- mittee on Foreign one authorizing the President to open negotiations with the Spanish government tor the purpose of Induc- iug tbat government to consent to the establish- ment nf a free and independent republic 'in Cuba, and the other in relation to the German ownership ot a large proportion ot tbe bonded debt of Cuba. While the second resolution waa being read Mr. Sherman moved thai the doom be closed. Tbe motion was carried. Mr. Call being thug oat off in bis desire to nuUte a speech before the public, .said be would withdraw tbe resolution, but the order to close the dooia waa carried into execution. At p. the doorj were reopened and tbe Senate took up the bel for the admission of Wyoming into the UniooM a State.. Tne Bill was laid aside temporarily and Mr. lagaOs of- fered a resolution instructing the Committee sa Privileges and Elections to inqaire into the publtefriUm ia the Ooaarestfoaai Record of a personal explanation by Mr. Call aad to report whether it. is IB accordance tha rales of the Senate, aad directing that peraoaal exlpanatloo be wipad frees pwmaoeat edt- doclot the Record uatll farther order tfcc Senate, Mr Call aald that aot tkiak tnattbc resolution adosted. waa possible ground or reasoa Mr H. awd av tor it. HahadasaedtteieaveofUteBiintwa June 3 to in tke iavtedi cation of iis career !a tke tat to a pamphlet attacking him. aad that aU thatneaaddfloe. A long aad beaMd MvUsmrr tweeu Sonatom aad Call. The dJ wa? fnrtbcr aartlclaated w Hoar. Gorman aad MaaocTMW. Mr. eaT'.cdfortbe gl rciototlvB weat aad tbe Scute proceeded witt tbt ktU for tkc Platt mtnaifedtae aa aa arron-tt to tawr of papiiax. Mr. Vest the WtJ frvwad ttat of th? Terrttorr did SWEPT BT A STORM. one otoe. Two inches of ill two BMaW and toe Wew Arty milea near down town.' On ndla; tke weketty was much (rroater. lifttftinff and thunder were'terri- ble Manyfatnilieaaoufhi- in eeQara, fearioff a In Kockdate vniiwy. south of city, the carried away bridges and drove people safety. AtThomp- mill 4rowned cattle and horses swept the first-story win- dows of 'Mr and the family refuge in the htlls. thirty wagon bridges thiooirhout ike county are undermined and vraaned twa.v..' wnterinir here all suf- fercd The bridge at Washing Milta, Cfaicago, Milwaukee Jk went down with a crash. On the hlimfto Central two bridges were waefiod ikinly between Dubuq ue arid feet of track were waaSed The Chicago, St Panl IDanaas City -was washed out foV weit and north of Du- buqne; 'and'fse road is not in operation except Dubuque. In the city done' wafe. -great. Many upper part sf the city are Iwater.''-.The damage, done in thii oeiMr ia estimated at over f DISSATISFIED. VM -lM UBOT ayvtta Wtat DvMand Increoead to Bold. une 26. is a stir anong railroud men here" on account of the in the city of F.-'M. of the Brotherhood of L6- Several oonfer- of riitflroad employes and employ- are tOkbe held here between now and Satnrday night "Big Four'' en- of butnor because several of the oktoet and :best 'men on the road have reoently been discharged without any known cause, it is claimed, and the' yard men, switchmen and other propose to demand an advance in _ committee wjll submit formal oomplalnts to Chief Arthur and representatives of the road. A special meeting of the Indianapolis division of the order of rail way conductors has been called for to-day in connection with the other conferences to be held, and, if necessary, support will be tendered the employes in other branches of the serv- ice who have grievances. RavUitar Lyncfaed. June 26. Near Brandenburg, Monday, Henry Watts attempted to commit an assault on a child of twelve yean. She sneceeded In cscapinir and_ran to her grandfather's house. A mobT was organised at once, .but Watts was -ar- rested by a deputy sheriff and placed in Brandenburg Jail. The mob went to the jail Tuesday night and took Watts seven miles in the country to where the attempt occurred and hanged him to a a Chaap Trip tn ST. Lotris, June 86. Mrs. Bose Fan- ning, MiM Callie A. Pritchetfand Miss Madge Frederick, tbe three lady teachers who were chosen to go to Europe In the Poet-Dispatch contest which closed a couple of weeks ago, left the Union Do- pot yesterday morning. The car in which they made the Journey to New York was packed with floral from friends. They will sail from New York Tuesday next. The European trip will last fifty days. ay a Mmrdtt. GJLLTESTOT, Tex., Jane Annie Turner, tbe beautiful daughter of John B. Turner, shot Tuesday evening, dying nlntost instantly. Her father and Prof. George Davis, of academy were in the roosa at time. The father ptotol from his uMghter's hand and shot profes- sor, InataaUy killing hint. of father to make m Is yliarsxS. M.- stter o'clock factory of Prospect of the Illinois Trouble. That Obndxkmfl Siperio- tendeat Will be Discharged. News of tke Gsktkeresl WtMMifvd Frolfht at Kaot S4. boaaaad ray Quit CHICAGO, June is a pros- pect that the strike on the Illinois Cen- tral road, which has paralyzed traffic on that road from Chicago to and the Wlscou-an branch, win be set- tled this morning, when General Super- intendent .Sullivan has promised tbe strikers to jfive them the. final decision of the company as to wbethf-r it shall discharge or uphold Superintendent Russell, the obnoxious official. A semi- official report says that tremendous pressure has been brought t-> bear on the corporation and that it ,ias tacitly agreed to dismiss Russpll. A.t the close of a conference with the strikers' last: evening Superintendent Sullivan said: "1 agreed to give the men a final answer concerning "Russell ten o'clock .Thursday .morning, .and whiile I have not what that answer will be, J am quite sure it, will end the strike." Grand Master Wilkinson has arrived from Galesburg and last evening de- clared his approval of every move that has been made by the striking trainmen. ST. Lotus, June 36.-'L'he fwiisjhthand- lers of the different railroad freight houses in East St. Louis have been re- ceiving SL25 per day. Tuesday night a demand was- made by the men for per iand extra at the rate of eighteen oenta an hourvfor over-time. >Vednesday morning ttie request was re- fused and fljo; house' employes of (Jen railroads, to the> number -of quit work. The freifbt houses are filled with (roods, mostly of a periBhable nature, and unless; some settlement is soon reached the will be quite heavy. Local shippers are loading and unload- ing direct from cars wherever possible1 in order to' ay bid dieray." Nearly aoo teamsters- belonging to the tratisf or com- panies are idle in consequence of the The local agents claim to have no au- thority to grant the increase asked for and have telegraphed to their represent- ative superintendents for instructions. The strikers are confident of gaining theirpbinV Severai non-union men attempted to go to work yesterday forenoon, but were set npon by the strikers and compelled to leave the freight bouses. Mayor Stevens has promised tbe companies po- lice protection, but it is thought the strike will be settled peaceably. ON THE Ftered.br the Leading CwMotry. Following are the scores of Wednes- day's games: BCATIOJTAL LJEAOUT. At New York 1, Cincin- nati 8. At Boston 10, Pittsburgh At Philadelphia 5, Cleve- land 1. At Chicago Brooklyn Chicago A. AttCBICAX ASSOCIATION. At Rochester 8, Athlet- ics 7. At Brooklyn 5, Syracuse 1L At St. Louisville 7, St. Louis ten innings. At Columbus 10, Toledo PLAYZkS' LEA9UX. At Boston 7, Chicago 10. At Philadelphia 5, Buffalo L At New York 14. Pitts- At Brooklyn Cleveland is. _ _ MOTEB8. i I Pa.. Jsne At tnt o'clock last nigkt the rvoeutns; party know ex- actly arkMt they wws in tke tcntt since tks Hill ttsnater. They are swoe sixty toet frost tks poiht hi tks Bitt Pnm what H ts tks HARTEB rOtt Trwtor tlu NoMl aatiofe In (lOeMUt iHatrloc June M. DL Hartnr was nominated on the 158d ballot nesday niornlnj, Ricbland giving him 62 votes, Ashland S3, Morrow >U and Crawford 51. Barter's friends did great deal ot hard work for hire Tues- day night, and its effect was very ap- parent after the 151st ballot, which largely After CrawforA; gave her solid delegation his nomina- tion was made unaninu> is, the ottor candi'dates -Withdrawing. The greatest excitement prevailed before this ballot. was taken, as Knox Crawford and Delaware retired for consultation. After, the'; withdrawal speeches of the other candidates had been made in a neat, vigorous sp9ech accepted the honor conferred on him. The nomina- tion of llarter is in accord with wishes of ex-President Cleveland Senator-elect Brice. It heals a breech between Mr. Barter and Senator PnblUhcni Will Htfutr to .-BIO. Jnne 26. Attorney- General Watson has furnished State School Commissioner Hancock with aw opinion to the effect that Gever law the State School Book is authorised to An tract for school at eightj'per cent of the lowest price at which books are sold to bjr the publishera, without rejfard to list price. Under the construction the law publishers will refuse to old, which may necessitate an entire chaeftri- in school books throughout the State. Old-Time Star In Hard Lack. CiiicLEvn.i.K, O., June Those wfca- formerly knew ex-champion vaulter ani baro-back. rider, will doubtless be surprised learn that he is living near here, in. straitwned circutnstaucsa. He totally blind and his support is a, small pension he receives from the Gov- ernment. He makes his home with- ax old gentleman named Stivorson, lives about eight miles north of Masonic CjOfxoy, O., June The new Ma- sonic temple was dedicated Wednesday with appropriate exercises. were present from all over the State, including Holyrood and Oriental oom- manderies, Knights Templar, of land, and the Akron comtnandery, and formed a monster procession. Publio exercises, conducted by Grand Master Burdiek and Grand. Coutmander were held in the afternoon: for MAKIOX, .Tune Ex-Deputy Treas- nrer of Marion County Robert Beatty 'Tuesday pleaded guilty to the charge ot tax raising and was fined and coetav This ends the famous 1898 Martin County treasury matter, aa ex-Treasnret Dickson was acquitted on th'e charge of embezzlement some time ago. June -X. the land appraisers are beginning .to' be. received, and all, without show startling decreases in values.. Springfield township has reported and. the total appraisement is I960 the appraisement was Will Attoa4 O., June Governor Campbell and staff and the Tbomaa. Club, of this city, headed by the teenth Regiment Band, will attend of the Hendrkks statitv at In- dianapolis next Tueaday, leaving nicht before. Jane asyieiat for waterworks Tneaday a fnw- waa voted a local company teMiU. by a majority of owt A yroyeaition that tb waa loat by a tt I Avda. van. haa to oeart fvrr a-iUMwt trtaJ a dtflkuity wn tke to Ckkacn. aMaw rWk tknt say t TVs for tkia jenr faM, nfatr JlarOJi tra Mr. _ -w a mwvOLr-i m r   

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