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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 25, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 25, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. )L- IL NO. 149. SALFM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY JUNE 25. 1890. TWO CENTS. r, WliW to MM, GMhrrt Aiont. Cris for A COMPLETE tlE-CF. Ccatnl TUG FOR is, June Harry Bal- ker Harria and Edward Carr, and Frank Brennish, white, iged here Tuesday. Harris. Ballard were executed at L Brennish, who wished to be done, was swung off an hour lie three colored men all con- >ir ciimes, and showed no signs t the gallows. Brennish t influence of liquor when led ecutions took place in the rear >i the jail and were witnessed 150 persons, including relatives ds of the condemned, deputy nd members of the press. The rrants were read by the sheritf m., and ten minutes later the n started to tbe gallows. The cks walked up the steps with ;ad and exhibited no signs of ughout the trying ordeal. The 1 at and the necks of all n were broken. y of forty minutes occurred and ennisb staggered up the steps tbe drop. When asked if he thing to say, he attempted to nt the wound in his throat pre- him speaking above a whisper gave it up. He was stnpe- L whisky and exhibited no con- he drop fell at p. m.. and utes later life was pronounced His neck was broken by the CHICAGO, June The Illinois Cssv aal strike has assumed serious propov Sons, inasmuch as it now infolves immenae suburban traffic of the roasV A neeting of the strikers was held early Tnesday morning, at which tbe de- iided to stop the running ot all trains except those the maiL Ac- cordingly, as fast as tbe suburban trains cam in tney were sidetracked, aal it was not long before the tracks were completely blocked up, suburban trains, freight trains and through and way pas- trams being mired in almost in- extricable confusion. The last subur- ban train arrived at the depot at 8-30 a. m., and the men announcol that would be the last suburban train to come in or go out until the question as to Superin- tendent Russell's retention was decided one way or the other At present the strike afreets the road only from Chicago to ICankakce, but the men say thdt unles? they gain their point they sill tie up the entire system. The officials held a conference which ended at 1.30 p. in The only conclusion arrived at that they would resist the men's demand LT Superintendent Russell's discharge The iailro5l offi- cials now await on the part of their emploj os. The strikers are Hi m and confident and scout at the idea of any overtures on their part to the coTaoany. G'and Master Wilkinson, of the Brotherhood of Trainmen, will be here to-day and the strikers expect him to out the men on all divisions of the road. The whole system will then be tied up from Chicago to New Orleans. Ihe railroad maragement say they expect the men, on sober afterthought, to return to work and are making no endeavor to fill their places. Suburbanites in thousands flocked home yesterday on crow ded cable cars, and people are discommoded. imtaw Pm dcak for Approval. WASHUTCTOX, June readiag ol the journal yesterday, Mr. of miaots called attention to the fact 1MI showed the Legislative Appropriation amended by the Senate to to the Committee on Approprist oas notice to the House. He said that il had been decided in the case ot the Silver it was that tho reference should open House and that the toUl should have to the Comm ttee ot the Whole. Th2 87 said thai the usual custom had been fol that the record duly informed the House of references and therefore declared the approved. The report of the Committee on AL tious upon the Senate amendm-nis v> the islative Dill was presented by Mr. Butterw. He said that in the case of inconMKinL_-_ amendmenta the commutes recommended oas> eurrence but where salaries weri new offices created the committee mended non concurrence. The report of spa oom-nittee was agreed to and a conference Mr McKn'ey, rronj the Committee oa Rules reportei the following resolution- That unm-diitely after the passage of lution the House proceed to consider the saver bill with Senate amendments and at two o pjaea: Woduesday June 31 (.to-day) the prennps question be coou'dered as ordered. He nunded the previous qaestioa on the ad< of the resolution, which wajCotdered, sad t minutes' debate was allowed on either. Mr. Bkrant ol Georrfa, depreciated tice of controlliBK Committee  m a ghastly wound. He fell be lifeless body of his wife. He ed. was convicted and sentenced On leaving the jail for Jack- remarked that no rope would etch, hisi neck, intimating selt- tion, but a close watch has been id yesterday he took the rope eternity, iristmas night last, about eight Harry Ballard. colored, entered t car on the lower end of Main driven by G. E. Pinkston. Short- he got in tbe car, failing to de- is fare, Pinkston requested him Ballard refused and became 3, -A hen the driver told him that it either pay or leave the car jan remained quiet for awhile, Ivanced to the platform with the "Here is your plunged 'e into the left breast of the killing him almost mscantly. urderer jumped from the car and eared, but was arrested tbe next ig and lodged in jiiil After nis e was convicted and suffered the >e penalty of the law v )arr. colored, on the afternoon of iber 9, 18S9, walked into the sta- Dtise and handed a pistol to Chiel saying: "Take it: I have killed ife SalUe, and want to die." On questioned he stated that he lied her a few minutes before on street The woman had been shot tiroes in the heart and twice in east Four days later the mar- was arraigned in the Criminal and pleaded guilty, saying "I to The jury returned a ver- r murder in the ftrst degree. ,he night of July 1SS3. Frank iish. who wa red. Brennish had made 11 wife aad tbe went for tbe wife's profcecttoo. In shadow ot a HvrtNrtable wall ti aad i> by the nboisiiT. drew ard with a keen kaiJe Si- :a a ttocetit ta Nelgh- A VILLAGE TRAGEDY. raattay With Ausnlii LAXCASTEB, (X, few in- nabitanto of tbe hamlet of were thrown into a tumult of excite- nent Monday orer the wurder of Geortre Boyer a wealthy and well-known farmer, the deed supposed to have been committed by John Diadale, formerly tenant of Borer. Bad blood has existed between the Boyer and Disdale fanwles for some time, which culminated in this tnwredT. Disdale was discharged from the em- ploy- of Boyer last winter, and shortly afterward, on some pretense, had Boyar LATEST NEWS ITKHB. The La Blanche-Miuhell fight, wakfc waa to have taken place at San Fran- cisco on Friday of this week, hat indefinitely postponed. The Thirteenth Illinois Confieaaiowjl district Republican convention nom- inated Captain Haaaon, of Chris- tian County, for Congress. The walls of a burning building at Wildesheim, Hanover, fell recently; killing a soldier and a fireman and ten- ously injuring seven others. When Eyraud arrives at Paris he Witt be arraigned before a magistrate and confronted by Gabriella Uompard ia order to observe tbeenect of their meet' lag. The Yale-Cornell-Columbia freshmen's boat race on the Thames as New London, Conn., the othor v.-as won by Cornell, time Y.Ue stxsond and Columbia third. At Chicago the State's Attwrnay hat TURNERS IN POLITICS. Will Oppose Any for irreM Who t hiinge In tlon Oilier Res-uUuloot Adopted. NEW YOUK June At Tuesday's session of the Turnerbuud convention a resolution ft as adopted signifying its objection to any change in the present immigration laws and pledging its mem- ber" set to support any candidate for Congress who did not think so. The next Tarn fest will be held it Milwau- kee in 1893, and the next contention at Washington in 1892. The headquarters of the Turnerbund will be continued at St Louis. Resolutions were adopted to agitate the Australian ballot reform system and the election of the President by a popu- lar instead of by electors as at present A proposition-to establish a life insurance company among the mem- bers of the Turnerbitnd was rejected. A committee was appointed to examine a parcel of ground, sons twenty acres in extent, located in Florida, which has lately been presented to the bund for the purpose of establishing a home for old and disabled members. SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS. Sixth International Convention Opens at I'lttuhnrgU-Manj- Delegates Present. PiTTSV.ur.Cit. June '25 sixth in- ternational Sanday-school convention opened in an informal manner at Expo- sition Hall Monday The ex- ercises were mainly devouoia1. The convention opened for business Tues- day morning Thirty minutes were spent in devotional exercises. The cal for the convention was then read, and tbe enrollment of delegates and ap- pointment of committees followed. Three sessions will be held daily, con eluding Friday evening About 1.SOC delegates from all parts of tba work are present Exposition Hall is neatly decorated and is arranged to seat pcople. The delegates represent 113. S97 Sunday-schools, with T, tca-b ers and 9, 149. 997 scholars- mr. t. it j resolution was to seottre danalte ---_--_- action upon the sublet -sliver sad nejras surprised at the opposition rrom the other stte The Republicans bad Drought the al- most at once They invited Hw cur or non concur m the Senate It was results the were after, aad politics the Democrats were after Mr Springer suid the Republicans had Bad their ears to tte ground and had just had an awalten as and at'a-t som what tsrally it waS true the fcepubii an had been obtlnd to come over to the Democrat c position. On motion of Mr Me Onley tne spxual rule was adopted without div slon Mr Consrer of Tow chairman of tee OommUtee.presentc1. The report of that com- mittee It slmplj r_com uends thut the House lOu-crncur in eaca an4 nl' of e Senate amond ments to the Silver bill -ud requests a confer- nee or. the same Air mtind moved Hint concur in amendments. Wito motions pending the debate Cottier taking he initiative _" Mr Conger charged that-fwe oo'aage under he Senate bill moanta per Wttt. premium on th; silver of Mr. Cpa ger charged under bUL Sl'O 000 000 de- preciate and the gallant pensioners would suf- er a loss He said the r 'Mr Bland s i d that taere was no speculatioa in tpld and if there was free touiage ot ver the-e wou.d be no speculation in that pither He denied that there was any lobby If co'iM not get free coinage he wjs willing to accent tho House bill with an amendment pro- ndiDi? that the notes outstanding should not be limved to the cost price of the bullion, and another that the notes should be redeemed in A CHICAGO. June 23. -The national con- vention ot colored men in the United States called to wwt in thus city wat brief in its vision and attended by sev- en delegates. A resolution was passed com mitt" of one r of Colorado, said that if he could not get free couiags. he wou.d vote foe a four and a halt million b 11 as an Improvement OQMrSKeHey ofKinsas said the men who held the bon s mortgages opposed the Slu er bUl becau-e it meant cheaper money and larger sa'd that amonj his r-sanle the feeling tn favor of fres coinage per- mVate-1 all tlasl-s H' tell tt hf? duty to rote for anvmeisure that point.d in the directioa or Smruble. Of Iowa said lie drew the line at a law th.it would consume the ent.re American silver product, for he f e.ire-1 inflation more than he did contraction. Adjourned. conference report on the JroSi, office Appropriation bill WAS tiken upanl cons'dered. The following are the a-uendnients by the Committee on Appropria- t'oo'v Increaslig the item for mail depreda- tions inspectors' fees and expenses from to ITO.030: the item for clerks in po-rt Irom tr.sWTO to 17.900 000; rrducini? th item for mail and key-5 f rosn 000 135.000; increawtu the item rot trans- portation ot gft from to S peaking to the flrst arainimcut Mr. GOT- fflaaeondeinned Postal General's plan tor having addit-.oasj detectives to inquire icto small Blatters as wae-Ji r the of BO- are taat the bos of the oOcVu reascmably well performed: in the building other siaan matters Hethmzht was soaethhK ridieuiotts mil this. Mr" Plumb tiui increase reoom' mrn Je-1 was to lacteal At w York 13, Chicago 5. At S, Phil adelpbia 7. At 2, Cincinnati 0 At 18, Clevelam 3. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. At 6, Ath- letics 7. At 5, Syracuse 8 innings. LEAGUE. At 8, Chicago M. At York 10, Buffalo 8. At 4, burgh 8. At 8, Cleveland 1 STUBBORN CONTEST. Democrat Coareatlon of tbe Fifteenth Ohio District tatoM ISO Ballots Wlthnat VoaUaattaK a Candidate for Coo ULtxsFiELD, O., June Demo- cratic Congressional convention of the Fifteenth Ohio district bids fair to be a noted one in the political history of the country. Ihe convention met at eleven o'clock Tuesday morning and with but short intermissions WM continuously in session until last night, when after 150 ballots bad been taken without a nomination, the convention recessed un- til this "morning. The nomination is equivalent to an election and each of the six counties in the district has one or more among them ex- Congressman Fmley, of Crawford Coun- ty, and Poppleton, of Delaware. M. D. Barter, trader, is also in the race, but made a poor showing until the later ballots The 150tb ballot stood as iollovs: Finlfy M, Barter Seward Critcrifield 35, McCray 33, Poppleton 20. Necessary for choice, 111. STILL. A MYSTEBY. Whereabouts and Condition of the En- tombed Miners Tet an Uiisoired Ques- tion. DO-BAB, Pa., June where- abouts and condition of the entombed miners are mysteries still. The rescu- ers seemed satisfied with tbe progress made Tuesday. The course ot tbe dig- gers was again slightly changed. This has been construed as another evidence that those in charge of tha work are confused and to an extent lost The diggers themselves disagree as to their location and seemingly are as complete- ly lost as ever. They may find them- selves at any moment. Tbermay not locate themselves for a week. But ht- tle confidence is placed in the predic- tions of the mine inspectors. The cold fact is they don't know. No one knows. Thi- uncertainty, waiting and watching is burning out the verv lives of tbe fami- lies ot tbe unfortunate miners. fora number of city official? to appear Before the grand jury and tell w bat they know about hoodling in the City Council Census Supervisor roughly estimates Brooklyn's copulation at These figures are rather disap- pointing, it b-ing expected they would run up to at least 900.000. The three reftv on the Untoa Paeiucoxcursion train of colored jumped tne near Kan., arrestod. As usual at this season of tl-o I caused summonses to bo year, Disdale, being a poor man, turned his cows out to pasture on the highway, which shortly afterward got intoBoyer's field. The latter anft son while driving them out, came in con tact with Disdale's two bova. They became involved in a quarrel at once, when Disdale senior rushed out to take part At this junct- ure George L Boyer fell with a bullet in his heart, and it is alleged that the elder Disdale fired the fatal shot After .falling Boyer staggered to his feet, and, with the desperation of a dying man, grappled with his murderer, struck him a fearful blow and then Ml dead. QUITE A DmCIJNCY. of a Corporation Overdraws His Accounts for a targe Saw. SPBIWGHELB, O., June circles were greatly surorised Tuesday by the report that Thomas F. McGrew, Jr.. treasurer of the Superior Drill Com- pany, had overdrawn hit accounts and left the company. His personal account is said to be overdrawn, variously esti- mated at from to Other ir- regularities alleged by the offlcets of the company are being investigated by an expert McGrew's resignation, last Saturday, was accepted. Vice President Robert Johnson discovered the shortage at the time McGrew made his annual report McGrew is prominent in business and social circles, and explains that he was carrying more stock and maintaining more enterprises than his means per- mitted. He will make the shortage good. Ability. POMEBOY, O., June young col- ored man who recently reached Letvt, this county, from Baltimore, Md., went in bathing in tbe river the other even- Ing, lie claimed to be an swimmer, and attracted a large crowd to see him perform some startling feats in the water. He leaped into the water and did not come up again. His body was found floating at Syracuse, fifteen miles below Letart each G -aeral. thoacat. entirely m s- sal tae.r 10 atai. The Vjl wa- The vo th- linn of lie atxl June returning to irt? hotel after having performed at Her Majesty's Theater Motley evening. Madame Sara Bonhardt suffered from aa attack of insomnia. Finding her- self nnable to go to sleep she took what proved to be an overdose of chloraL her the famowi actrwB appeared to in a dying condition and physicians were After pjwUVent efforts j lasting through four and the of powerful ttaranardt began .Jowly to recovw. for Blg-amy and Forgery. CANTOS, June F. Barn hart, who ia wanted at York, Pa., on charge of forgery, desertion and larceny, "was arrested at Middle Branch, near here, Monday afternoon by Chief of Police Gentry, of this city. Barnhart came to this city a few years ago aad married a young girl named Dickerhof, while he had a wife liyiag at York. A Pennsyl- vania officer came last night to take him back. _______________ Mrs. Aftae'ft Blander Salt. LIVA, O., June Lydia Ague has commenced criminal proceedings against Mrs. W. T. Graves, alleging that Mrs. Graven reported that she had seen the plaintiff and Dr. Vance, clothed in only nature's costumes, occupying the same room in Ague's house. Mrs. Ague denies the allegations, and says the re- port was cjrculaied for the sole purpose injuring her reputation. Klrtsan's Ucht Sentence. 0-. June "W. Xivison. convicted of stealing a patfcaze containing from the United States Express Company, has 'been sentenced by Judge Robinson to ten months in the penitentiary. Mrs. came here from Michigan aad with her husband when sen- tenced, _______________ ttw f it rl O.. Jane midget, was to tbe GoutKil frosj tbe Fifth Monday H. G. a his lie took his srat Acrcrica. recently. Most of the occupants wers bruised and seven wero badly hurt. The commission of medical sent by tbe Spanish government to the province of the purpose ot investigating the epidemic which hat been raging there, pronounces the dis- ease to be Asiatic oholera. The mission also reports that how the pesti- lence had its origin is uncertain. The Prussian Minister of Finance, Dr. Von Scholz, has tendered his navion and it has been accepted by the Emperor, tie will be succeeded by Dr. Mlqual, who will take charge ot the Finance Department on July 15. At the recent city election at Keys, Fla.. Colonel E. J. Lutcctolh, the law and ordftr candidate, was elected mayor to succeed Mayor Cottrell, whose whereabouts are still unknown The Cottrell fiction worked bard to defeat Lutertolh On a farm near Westphalia, the other doy, aiarmer'a son, in the ah- sence of the other members of family. fire to the bouse, and ctom.vted him- self and the servant girl. The girl had. reprfatetlly rejected the i 'King man's offers of marriage and ai become f mentally unbalanced in On June 30 a new thro wilr- to "-established bet Philadelphia, Baltimore ton. via Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Tbe railroads forming the new route are the Boston Maine, Central New England Western, Pennsylvania, Pouffhlceepsie Boston, Jersey Central. Philadelphia Reading and Baltimore Ohio. Several shocks of earthquake have occurred in the vicinity of the Black Forest of Transylvania, creating. great consternation among the inhabitants, many of whom have deserted their houses and are camping out Very lit- tle damage to property is reported, bnt in many places the earth has cracked, leaving fissures deep enough to engulf any house in tbe disturbed region. THE MARKETS. Grain aad Frovtstmh NEW YORK, June M at per cent., the lowest rate, the "highest Exchange closed steady Posted rates actual rates for demand. Government bonds closed steady. Currency Cs at iw; at 122K; at KB. CLEVELAND, June at Minnesota patent at Minnesota spring at No 8 red at Xo rid at Ste. mixed Wwtcra yellow mixed white at Xs. So 2 miied at Hn. Fancy creamery tt isc, dairy at Ife. New York at lie, Ohio Eocs-StrlcUjr at He. PoTATOBS-Barbaataiat hosMl. New YORK. .teadi. City mill M.aacsota eitra, at Xo. 2 r-a winter do July at K-ic. do Anf art ml SUSc. t at 4na r a   

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