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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 23, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM BAILY NEWS. OL. IL NO. U7. SALEM. OHKK ItONBAY JUNE 23. 1890. TWO CENTS. Begird tho M Defeat lu B6to the CoouaittM Tkat raxox, June There was a earnest conversation ia the ben tho Speaker called it to urday. The little knot of Dem- eaders were gathered around d's seat and it was evident that action was belay mapped out. iaker announced immediately journal had been aporovej objection that tho pending was a motion to reconsider the he motion io lay on the table al of Mr. Bland from the de- the Speaker that Mr. Blaud's n providing tor the considera- te Senate Silver bill was out of TARIFF UEDCCTIOS. Ttot Fmil of WASBKCTOX, Jnne clerk ol the Senate Finance Committee com- pleted the preparation of the statement sailed for hy the Plumb resolution adop- ted hj the Senate, showing the increases reductions in revenue which are estimated to follow the enactment of the Senate tariff bill compared with the present law and the McKinlo j bill. importations for the fiscal year o? duti- able Roods, the rates on which is pro- posed to change, aggregated in value and the duties collocsed on these aegregated The esti- mated duties on these articles (or an ag- gregate equal to that of the fiscal year) under the House bill is estimated at j resolution would be introduced with- while under the Senate bill I oat party sanction, for it is the intention the estimated receipts from the same of the Republican leaders of .both houses. aggregate are OOT. if po3Slbie, to send a tariff "bill to the The House bill transferred to the free i President before adjournment The list articles which during the fiscal year j comment of Mr. Blaine on tne tariff "bill 1SS9 were received in value of which been quoted so widely, and and paid dasy amounting to tteitteriy Mvnn. rfce TVAMrrxoTOT, June ts rumor current at the Capitol that a member of the Republican majority la the House of Kopivsentotivea will pre sent a resolution proposing an adjourn- ment of Congress at an early day. Such t _. VA. WtLL BOA1V The Senate bill transfers to the free list articL-s valued in the importations for and paying an aggregate duty of Adding to lha first of these amounts the amount of the intenal revenue reduc- tion found in the House bill (and struck out of the Senate billi tho total reduc- tion of revenue by House bill is found to be 571.OGt.77J.. while that of tho Senate bill is the figure named L short controversy it was de- it Mr. McKinley's motion to lay id's appeal on the table was in id the yeas and nays were or- Before the vote was announced the Democrats who had voted v their votes. The result was 16, nays the appeal was he table. Beaker then made a long state- icernlng his action in referring rerbill to ilie Committee on Weights and Measures and the proceedings in the House in 3 that action, fn conclusion he ed that the bill had been re- kccordlng to the rules of the on Coinage and an appeal taken from that reference, jwnsend, of Colorado, a Repub- ade a vigorous protest against re nee of the bill to the Commit- Coinage. No opportunity had a greater voice and political power than ren, he said, to offer amend- ______. f, TTTRXEItS' CONVENTION. Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the Band la New Attendance and Favorable NEW YORK, Jwie fourteenth annual convention of the North Amer- ican Turners met Sunday morning at Turn Hall and entered into formal bus- iness. Seven hundred and twenty-four delegates, representing; thirty-six States and districts, -were present President Muench delivered the opening address. He ths bunds upon their rapid growth. He s ud they controlled vhile the bill was under debate House. He thought that if the t to the Committee on Coinage at free coinage would be killed. >tituency looked on demonetiza- aa infamous crime. Messrs-. of Califon.ua; Bartine, of Ne- errmann, of Oregon, and Carter, ana. all Republicans, followed ime vein, each protesting against rence of the bill. longer, of Iowa, said that he iromise again that the bill should rted oack to the'House at the possible moment. The corn- had not been unfairly consti- j the Speaker. Mr. Connell, of ta, said he did not see why this be made a party question. The having closed, Mr. MeKinley 0 table Mr. Bland's appeal from aker's decision sending the Sil- to the Coinage Committee. The 1 nays were taken, nays 117, So the appsal was the table and the bill was re- o the Coinage Committee, ollowing Republicans voted with nocrats against Mr. McKinley's Messrs. Bartine, Connell, De- Hermann, Kelley, Morrow, nd and Funston. The Detoo- tio voted with the Republicans r of the motion were: Messrs, aw, Dunphy, Fitch, Geissen- Maish. McAdoo, Mutchler, of Massachusetts: Quinn, Wiley ihlnecker. treed With Stock. YORK, June H. Mann and r. Nelson, respectively president iditor of the New York Sea Railroad Company, were arrested ay on complaint of Frank Cian- who charges them with overis- rt jck o! the Ciancimino Towing importation Company, of which e officers. Mann and Nelson gave Fhey assert that the charges are s and that Cianicimino brought tion ont revenge for being from the position of manager of npany. June Postmas- has fixed the rates for Gov- it telegraph messages for the fls- beginning July 1. ISM. The ire exactly the rates of the pres- ai roar, which are much las than the orerions year. The nion has refused to accept wd jet has rewired no pay for sent dtirinz the present Thej intend to briag the before the courts. any other organization in the United States. The report of the united bunds shows a roll of members, with a total of property amounting to offset by indebtedness estimated at A board ol officers for th'e present convention was elected with Ueinrich Brown, of St. Louis, president Last evening an entertainment was consisting of vocal solos and an exhibition of elaborate and fancy gym- nastics. _______________ STOLE A TK4TN. Oaring Deed of a Tramp In Town of the Thief. la., June the work gang of the Milwaukee road were eating breakfast at a boarding house near the railway track Saturday a tramp entered the cab of the locomotive at- tached to the work tram standing at tbe depot and opened the throttle. The train pulled out with lightning speed and although the railroad uien saw it start they were unable to overtake it TOTI minutes later the engine of an in- coming freight train was detached and pursuit was made. The work train was standinz on the track seven miles west, but no trace wrs discovered of the thief. Steam up in the engine, but the tramp was evidently afraid to run by the town and so deserted his stolen property._______________ HE SOPGHT BEVENGE. Lutlj- Assaulted Clubbed With A Kevolver by Rejected Sailor. Sioux CITY, la., June 23 Otto, a young lady twenty years of ago, went to her bedroom late Friday night with- out a light She had not fully disrobed when she was clutched by a man who held a revolver to her head. Her screams awoke the family and the man made his escape, leaving the girl, whom he had clubbed with the revolver, un- conscious and badly bruised. The man waa recognized as Frank Dowey, a painter, who boarded with the voting ladv's mother, and whose attentions she had" repulsed. DCwey can not be found by police, but Mrs. Otto has received a threatening letter from him command- ing her to discontinue criminal prosecu- tion. remarks mswle by Senator Plumb and other Republican Senators in public debate concerning the measure "now pending in the upper house, make it ivident however near a unit the Republican party may be on the ques- tion of passing a tariff bill, it is certain- ly not a unit on the provisions of the bill as it passedihe House, or as it is re- ported from the Senate Committee on Finance' The Kansas are reported to be in favor of sweeping changes in the bill -and it is believed that if such charges are not made their votes -will' be cast against it Senator Injralls par- ticularly, with the fight for re-election now pending in his State, is likely to be rather independent of party demands. Friends of the Kansas Senator have gone so far even as to predict that no tariff bill will pass the. Senate at session of Congress, but to this propo- sition neither Senator Tngalls nor Sena- tor Plumb has been committed. There is an impression that if the Senate should fail of-this duty and Congress should adjourn without sending A tariff act to the Executive Mansion, the Presi- dent will call Congress together again immediately in special session to de- termine this question. There is no thought in the Senate now of an adjournment, or in fact an ad- journment before the middle of August. MJ. Hale has announced iis intention of pressing the reciprocity amendment lo ttse tariff bill oilcred by him during tho past week, in pursuance of the plan for promotion of the trade with' South- ern, and Central American countries sug- gested by the international conference and outlined in the letter of Mr. Blaine to the President, which was made pub- lic Thursday As this proj o ;es a dis- rir.ct departure frotn the policy of the Bouse and of the Senate Finance Com- mittee in several important particulars, it is likely to lead to extended debate. So the likelihood of am adjournment of longress before September seems to grow less every day._______ t of Labor. Interview with regard to the strietnresof littler Workman Powderiy in his speech m Cooper Union. He said the American Attention had nerer claimed any of railway organizations, as stated by ffewdvrly. It what he said to true, it a piece of treachery on his part to who weakness of a labor organi- sation. He knows that such informa- tion is valuable to employers. Mr. Gorapers that although tie has heretofore refrained from ehar- Powderiy and his associates as tfce'v deserve, the action of Mr. Powdfcr- Friday mint made it necessary for Miner not only to reiterate that already ifeargei, but to prove to Fowderly'a foi- and the general -public bis COD- conduct toward labor unions ijiireneral and trades unions in particu- Mr. Campers asserts that be is at any time" or in any place, nn- arrangements, to meet Mr- Powderiy face to face on this issue. BASE BALL. A FATAL COLLISION. on to ATOM Into Tnl% Hoveres MB   return to their leave tbeir suns in and not lotacr nica. b'i pro isiar oa part do aH cos1.-.) the more Coics Carlisle's ovixoToy, Ky., June A special election to choose a successor to fill John G. Carlisle's unexpired term in Congress was held Saturday in the Sixth Kentucky district The returns indi- cate the election of Worth Dickerson, the Democratic nominee, by ma- jority. He has probably carried every county in the district, although the vot- ing- everywhere was the lightest ever known. In some of the precincts the polls were not even opened and in others the only ballots were cast by the judges and clerks. The Republican candidate was J. Rairden. At ASSOCIATION. 4, At 4, Rochester tp-twelve innings. At Louis 4, Columbus 10. At S, Toledo 3. 8UXDAT GAMES. At 3, Toledo 2. At 18, Rochester T. At Louis 1, Columbus 7. Second Louis 5, Columbus 4. Glum Workers Strike. June trouble that has been brewing at McKee Bros.'- Jeannette flint glass works has culmi- nated in 200 men quitting work. The trouble wa.s caused by a flint worker who 4id not have a union card. Against the Ala., June per- son was killed and several badly in- jured on the East Tennessee, Virginia Georgia railroad at Calera Sunday morn- ing by an accident which happened in A very peculiar manner. The engine of a passenger train had been detached from the cars and started from the coal shute. three-quarters of a mile away, leaving the cars standing on the .track. The engine had gone but a short dis- tance when the engineer saw a freight train coming down the track toward him. The engineer, seeing that a col- lision was inevitable, reversed his en- gine. He then jumped from his engine, clocely followed by his fireman. The freight engine struck the passen- ger engine with full force and the col- lision opened tho throttle of the passen- ger engine, which without any occupant started back toward the train. It going forty miles an hour when it struck the passenger train. An express car and a passenger coach were completely wrecked.. A negro nurse empioye'd by (X M. Reynolds was instantly killed, the infant child of Mr. Reynolds severely injured, Mrs. Abner Pother, wife of the conductor of the trainv badly hurt and several other passengers more or less bruised. UNDEU AOAtt SUED. Opening of Park At- by a Bad Accident. June five and six thousand people were Sunday at the opemrfe ut Fairview Park, 'six miles north of this city. During tho afternoon a terrible wind and rainstorm. came up from the north west, and a large number sought shelter under a car shed. While they were thus huddled together a riolent gust of wind lifted the shed from the supports and turned it around to the southeast, tho edge falling to the ground and seriously injuring five per- sons. The injured are: Noah Fisher, colored lad, skull frac- tured and shoulder injured; Mrs. May JfcKar, badly bruised and unconscious LATEST NEWS ITEMS. An mnofieial statememt of the enumeration places the population Philadelphia at Supervisor of Census Lot Wright esti- mates the population of Clacinaati ia round numbers to be Supervisor ot Census Murray an- nounces that York City at a roufh estimate has a population of The Russian traveler Peachikott for roubles the hone on which he made his famous ride across the con- tinent. Congressman E. Mason reaomioated by the Republican convention of tfca Third Illinois Con- gressional district Brigands-near Smekli have captured Mahmoud Key. a wealthy cial, and de-nond ViO.OOi? for his release. Turkish soldiers have basn seat to res- cue him A yellow fever ship from IMa Jaa viro is detained as the Delaware quarantine for fumigation. Tasoo d.-atbs occurred on tho vessel on her ast voyage. Tho Boston Globe estimates the popu- ation of Boston, based on the alraady jompleted returns, as This a gain of nearly smca sho census of 1S30. The Masonic Grand Lodge of Nebraska has adopted resolutions inJorsiasf the action of the Grand Master in issuing an odict against the Csrneau body of the Scottish Rite. The President has granted a pardon to George Hubbard, convicted in. Arkan- sas of assault with intent to kill, and sentenced October 31, lS8a, to two yean and six months' imprisonment. Mrs. Stuart Robson, wife of the fa- mous actor, died suddenly at her sum- mer residence at Cohassett Beach, Mass., the other day. The cause of death is believed to be due to the bursting of blood vessel near the heart-" The House Committee on Appropria- tions has reported back to the House the Fortifications bill with the dation that the House non-concur in the Senate amendments. The Senate amend- ments to the bill increase tho appropria- tion about the men he was given work, jpom fright; Miss Jennie Miller, head non-union man the workmen Some of the men are of the opinion mat McKee Bros, intend to close the works a week earlier than expected and then reopen in the fall with a non-union force. Suicide CMMd by TKEXTOS. N. J.. June Hewitt Vac Matter's body was found Sunday in tho water power reservoir. Van Marter, who was clerk in a pottery, had been missing since Wednesday. He was en- gaged to a prominent young lady and hi? jealousy of her led to suicide. When found one hand and one leg were tied together with a cord. A note fonnd his body directed that 925 be paid to the finder of tne corose. There were also letters to his parents aad those of the yonnr lady. He was twenty years old. Bank 'Wrecker Convicted of TOLEDO, O., June E. H. Van Hoe- sen, late cashier of the Toledo National Bank, was found guilty of perjury in the United States Circuit Court Satur- day night. The jury was out two hours. The perjury consisted in certifying false returns to Comptroller of the Currency. There are still twenty-five indictments against him for embezzlement. Van Hoesen bad been in the employ of the bank for over sixteen years and his de- falcations resulted in wrecking the in- stitution. _______________ .Keadv to American FUhermen. HALIFAX S. S., June Cana- dian cruiser Acadia has been fitted out here and she will soon be in readiness to proceed to sea- She has been pro- vided .with powder and shot. The Acadia will cruise about Prince Ed- ward's Island and the If ova Scotia coast, keeping a sharp lookout for American fishermen. The otiier vessels of the fleet, the steamer. Stanley and the schooners Connaoght and Vigilant will nlso soon he in readiness for tbe same Kit Mrs. struck. I jurea about the hips; Mrs. D. A. Myers, wife of councilmanMyers, limbs bruised and back sprained. The injured were brought to the city and received medical attention. Fisher is regarded as in a very dangerous con- dition, but the others are not supposed to be fatally hurt Ort Ml DC.VKAK. Pa.. Mining eagi- Sunday afternoon ec-mplet-d an- other surrey of Mahoninjr mines. Tiey say that are on the rirbt. track and it is believed ea- anincru will be reached to-day. Tbc dtiay was canned by intaaeMe rock on Kettritd limit ii tiiieved that a way of feet :n will aad it will reqvirc but a abort V- work Jnae the close of the Mnldoon-Kilrain combination exhi- bition at the Grand Opera House Satur- day evening Jake was served with a in a suit brought by Detective John T. for alleged in eocortinjr Kilrain to the bat- tle ground of tbe fight DEATH IN A STORM. Large LOM of Property at Man Killed and a Nntcber Injured OMAHA, Keb., June eight and nine o'clock last night a severe electric storm, accompanied by wind and rain, swept over this city. Cellars were flooded in various parts of town and much property destroyed by water. On Thirteenth street lightning killed a team of horses attached to a street car. At 2013 Manderaon street, in the north- ern part of the city, the house of R. A, Jacobsor. was struck. Jacobson was killed and bis wife and children badly hurt. At South Omaha the roof was blown off the Grand Central Hotel am the interior flooded. A two-story house occupied by R. E. Knbn was struck arc -burned. Mrs. Kuhn and two children were rendered unconscious by the shock and were rescued from the burning building by the firemen, who discoverer them through the merest chance. Th damage here and in the suburbs wil reach crvp "WAsirrsoTos. June weather crop bulletin for the veek ending June 31 says: Tbe crop conditions through- out the Southwest. Southeast and tbo Ohio valley were improved by tbe favor- able wemther during the pas: week, ex- cept in some localities ia tbe Upper Lornkwr MIllK Burned. MILACA, Minn.j June The mills of tho Lie Lumber Company, val- ued at causr'jt are Friday night and were totally destroyed. no insur-.i'f-c on the mills.' The Ore started in the oil room. Watchman Burtice had A narrow escape for his lite and was pulled out of tbe room where the flames started. _ Threatened Strike of Ut.flOO HcsTisctTOx, Pa., June The mift- ers in tho Phillipsburg, Bench Creek and Osceola bituminous districts, numbering are dissatisfied with the present scale of wages and a general strike is thfeatened. Thelaborershava issued a circular demanding a higher scale of prices with increased pay far dead work. _ THE MARKETa at 4 Floar. Gmln MM! YORK. June Closed per cent. Exchange steady. Posted rates actual rates 495 for sixty flays and 487tf for Government bonds dosed 6s at 113, -is. co Jpon, rteudr. Cnrrencr 4Hs do Jnne Country at Il.d035.10. patent at I6503.YI5, Minnesota spring No 2 red at No. S red at Sfie HIgn mixed at 36c Jto. 1 red at We. No i! mind at Xte, No. a white at Me, No Fancy creamery at-lae, dairy at Ito. CHIKSI-NCW York At lie. Onto atKte. Strictly frein I4c. PoTAlOES-Burbunlts at fiOSASc per tousbeJ. Nmr YORK. July 21 Weaker. Cttj mlB extra "ae at raper- fice at 9S OOSS.75, extra at M. Lower. So. red winter do at rtXc. do inly (SHC. -XO. t mixed at do M OATS-XO. 2 mixed do Jiae at do July at MXc. Kilrain 1> very ifediraant and charges I Mississippi and Ontral Ohio valleys, witb iarrate. where hca y caused temporary H. tfc- Dwno- eraUc primaries ia this city Satur- day ereainc to instrar: fur Governor in favor of Wallace. He wrvtn. Pattimxi and KUck tn citr. Tbe Utter will not for fHttUca. Thin n majwrty in rmtatT Oiar- hfe friends arc corre- harvest of wheat is ia in Sou'.bcrn Illinois and Southern Indiana. le the former tbe as fair and of ffvnd quality. Tbe oondilios of com thro.gaout principal e July BcmB-Wwtcrn cf Wcrtern 9st, common to good. Ml -Jaly at SlSc at PoRK-July III X Aopirt at IMO. C LoN-r. a Mtttrb of to death SatsrdaT. LoVr tiea sp ia their   

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