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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 14, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE M BAILY NEW; II. NO. 140. SALEM. OHIO, JUNE 14. 1890. TWO CENTS. And Aldrich Orate oo Silver. n tke mil Extended Until the Pint of iiext Week. In Appropriation TBAT SHORTAGE. tk. Mr. Paddock Raid be had received tgrams from Montana in regard to the Cheyenne I di.ins. and asked It liad been takvn the Comtniuee on strain to the matter. Mr. b-igun to respond to the question; of Mr Plumb that there time left for the discussion ol the matter vas ullowe j to go over ite Silver bill was then taken up and in resumed his argument. He be- t Congress was obliged under the 10, to coins Of silver and coins le complained that the Finance Com- lendmenttotheHouie bill did not e coinage of th silver bullion pur- Aa treasury except at the discretion cretary of the Tre sury. It did say eretary shou'd coin enough of it to it of the bullion at its market price but it d'd not say in what de- i it should be coined, whether in dol- ibsidiarv coin. Tais meant the de- on of silver. He objected also to the [raiting the continuance of the act to The purpose of that 1 notation was the as't ition which bad ?o Ion? dis- e the conflict between gold ich next addressed the Senate. The tion. he said not belong to that sea which found it necessary to ap- slou and prejudice, rather than to p. A great monetary problem like I be discussed In a "dispassionate nd with sole reference to reaching- a .on. There no substantial differ- sen Senators as to the evil effects re- m the outlawry of stiver; the only as. as to the remedy. He believed a emedy could be found only in suite rould open the inin's of all nations to olnasre of silver Tne 3y the Finance Committee to the he said, would more eltectually raon- r th in the system now in force under JST8. o'ulock Mr Stewart was soeaking in VIr. Aldrich when under the agree- >ral debate shoald hare closed, but ous consent it was agreed that the iver bill should be Uld on the table, bill substitute.! for it and general de- ided until three o'clock Monday after- urdayto be to bills on the ;an advocated the unlimited coinage In reply to questions of Mr. Hoar, n admitted that rates of fjterest had nd the necessaries of life gone down, es had gone up since the demonetize 1S73. He said, however, that in de that act he was speak. ng about the j power of money, not about the rates Mr. Daniel addressed the Senate ngth in support of free coinage That is the only thins would bring sil- v collnqny started by Mr Edmunds, mt Senator contended that the infla- rrency rebutting from the pending roulJ benefit the rich alone. Mr. Al- d attention to the fact that woen in 13tt5, a resolut.oa was oZered in the avor of retiring greenbacks and re- pecie payments, every Democratic oted for it. isl said that the question was greater or rather it was greater than nism and noi quite so great as De concluding his speech J'r. Daniel r a secret session, after which the 3ouvntfd -After the read nz of the journal the ;nt into Committee of the W hole on y Civil Appropriation bill. Mr. Cau- Jlinois, said the amount of appropna- -d bv the measure was, in round num- Mr. Goodnight, of Kentucky, strike out tne clause relative to the survey. ksry slid that the only thing the com 3 to determine was whether it would e existing law Mh'ch segregated t e and prohibited them from settlement his appropriation. Milhn. referring to the present de- indttion of agriculture, said that it ised still further to tax the farm: still burden the bankrupt in pr- se money to used in surveying at present susc? ?i.iole of agriculture. of argjed th.vt tne pres- .hould be repealc.l. or that an anpro houlel be made. After further debate, night's motion was rejected. t completing thr; tonJ.dsr nlon of the immittee rose and the Hoase took a til eight o'clock, toe evening session he conhidjratlon of private pension ning session was not protiilc of re- lirty private pension bills were ad- the stase of th-'rd reading, but none and the n riant Victory. -.THIGH. June jury in e of Charles Silverman, the irg original package dealer, or the Ohio Brewing Company -rial for violation of State and iquor laws WAS held futtan- ndered their verdict Friday, as g-uilty of soiling- license. guilty of to minors. of to persons of known intemperate This is regarded M victory mal package dealers in Pennsyl- YORK, June to report that a shortage of had been discovered ia accounts of the cashier of an Albany bank (the rumor Jnetttioning no an Albany spe- cial says the ruaiort have finally in- volved the name of the late John Tem- pleton, cashier of the Albany Bank, who died two months ago. Just prior to his death Teaapleton borrowed of the bank to invest in certain stocks. The investment did not pan out well and the collaterals given as secur- ity by the cashier could not bo realized on. His family at once offered to turn over over to the bank a life insurance policy, and also mortgaged their home to reimburse the bank. For some reason the agent of the insurance company fused to pay the money the bank and they have been trying to force the payment. Superintendent Maxwell, of the insurance department, was appealed to and threatened to take the amount from the deposit of the company left with him as a bond. This had the de- sired effect and the company has ex- pressed its willingness to pay over the iconey to the bank. CHKISTIA.N Eneouraglnsr Reports Received by the St. tonU Convent 1 m Increase in Membership. i 8r. Lotrrs, June second session of national convention of the Youag People's Society of Christian Endeavor was called to order at nine o'clock Fri- day morning. Reports received from different States showed that the rrem- bership of the society had increased at the rate of nearly fifty per cent, during the past year. Treasurer Shaw pre- sented bis annual report The total re- ceipts during the year were ex- ponsys, Rev. O. H. Tiffany, D. D-, of Minneapolis, spoke on "The Two Elements of the Devo- tion and Support of Church Service." Rev. W. H McMillen, D. D., of Alle- gheny, Pa., delivered an address on "Public under tha head of "Enemies of the Pledge." The after- noon was occupied in receiving reports from various committees. SHOT BY HIS SOX. Sixteen-Year-Old .Uurdi-rs His Fa- Futiit Eii'lln-jof a FdinUvQunrrrt. ELMUIA, X. Y.. Juno Frank War- ren, a commercial traveler, was shot and instantly killed at his residence by his son Herbert, a sixceen-year-old boy, at an early hour Friday morning-. AYar- ren returned from a trip Thursday night find began quarreling with his wife. The boy. who bad b2en in bed, arose and interfered and producing a revolver 5hot his father in the right breast. Young Warren was arrested, lie takes the matter very coolly and says he saw his father chasing his'moiher around the bed. Seeing his mother in danger of being beaten, be fired the fatal shot. The coroner, who arrived shortly after the shooting, found several let ers of an affectionate nature from a woman in Jsorwalk, Conn., and another from Bath, N. Y., making appointments. Warren and his wife had quarreled frequently of late._______________ A Double Trajrerty. PHILADELPHIA, June 14. Shortly after three o'clock Friday afternoon two pistol shots in rapid succession were heard in the cellar of a dwelling on Maple street below Cumberland. Sev- eral persons entered the place and found William Collins and Charles Dermer lying on the floor dead. Both men were about thirty years of asrc. Collins had been shot through the right temple and Dermer in the mouth. The police claim that Collins first killed Dermer and then shot himself- Business dented in Volume. FLOOD GHB Crop Prospects, Which An ImproT- Inr, AU Markets. or to With to Checked. YORK, June 14. G. Dun Co.'s Weekly Review of Trade says: Speculation has been neither large in volume nor enthusiastic in tone during the past week, but the legitimate busi- ness of the country continues unprece- dented in volume for the season, sad highly encouraging Jn prospects. Al- though the treasury has taken In tV more money than it has dis- bursed, and foreign exchange has ad- vanced about a cent during the week, the current rate for money on call has declined from five to four and one-half per-cent. Tnere has been quite a de- cline in exports from New York for two weeks past, the vslue having been four- teen per cent, below that of the same weeks last year, while in imports here t moderate increase continues, But the flow of currency to tMs center supplies demands and makes the market easy, and confidence in currency expansion by legislation is unabated. Crop prospects begin to rule all mar- kets at this s ason and these are dis- tinctly improving. The capacity of iron furnaces in blast June 1 was tons, against May 1 and a year ago. It seems scarcely credible that the actual consumption can be thirty-one per cenv greater than a year ago, and yet, the tone of the market is fairly confident and does not indicate material accumulation of stocks. East- ern makers are said to have checked the incipient advance in prices, in order not establish a market for Southern and Western producers to unload on. The demand for various forms of manufac- tured iron and steel is still good and prices steady, and sales of tons of rails are reported. The wool market has been dull, sales at Boston being only pounds, and dealers there do not regard the out- look with confidence. Philadelphia and Chicago reports indicate that growers are holding for higher prices. No im- provement is scon in woolen goods, though dress goods are in .fair request hero and stocks of light weight clothing are small. Flannel mills are already cutting down production. Reports from other cities show a healthy state ol trade, with clear signs of improvement whore better crop prospects have imme- diate influence. Hallway wars do riot on the con trary. more cutting of easf.bound rates appears and speculative rnanagprs are suspected of willingness to see lower prices. It is but fair to remember that the competition of Canadian and lake lines is felt wish constantly incro.is'Hg severity, and until the inter-State law has >-een changed apparently must be Prices of shocks have been weaker. for Two. fwr One. IXGTOS, Jane House tec investigating: the charges rainst the Service Comrnw- >Te agreed tjpon a rvport. The ays: find that Coaimissien- wvelt and Tborop-on bare dis- tbeir duties with entire fidelity 'rrity. and that the condsct of brawn has been i-T a lasutT of discipline in the of tbf of the wsr> NIAGAKA FALLS X. Y., Juno Representatives of about thirty leading soap-making firms of the Cnited States bad a very qniot meeting at the Catarmct Thursday and formed what is to be known as the National Soap-Makers" Association. It is expected that about 150 of the leading firms of the country will enter the organization. They claim that thev hare not formed a combine, but that the object of the now associa- tion will benefit the members in other ways-______________ FtttAlly Injured I" Sious Cm-. Ia.. June J B. wc-alihy English banker, was fatally injured last evening by thrown from now ia a of polo between tbc Sioux City aad Lc Mars clubs. Mr- wss Tricked sad rts The- OUK fteaults ot GAME. Between Base Leading Clubs. Following arc the scores ot Friday's games: SATIOXAl. LEAGUE. At Cincinnati Cleveland 5, Cijcin nati 7. At New York 2, Brooklyn 4. All other games Vain. AMEKICAX AS-OflATIOX. At Brooklyn 4, Athlet- ics 5. At Louisville Toledo 4. Louisville 3. All other games Dostponed rain. PLATEKS' LEAGUE. At Pittsburgh 11, -Buffalo 1. At Chicago 12, Cleveland T At New York 7, Brooklyn Filibustering Watching SAX FRAXCTSCO. June 14- Special azeni of the Department of Justice Colonel C. "E. Foster, who has been in vestigating the recent fiiibusterin; movement to capture Lower California. has left for Washington. Before lea vinir he said: "The filibustering scheme of much magnitude aad fully as cxtev sire as has been reported. It way resal in aa increased jnilitary force bc placed alone the Mexican border by the Govern mont." Enomous Ratafell In Central Mew York. WMbed by the Frovi Tuvtr Loo WUl Thoocaad Dot- Roatr', N. Y., June heavlott for yean fell here Thursday liffht fhe Mohawk river is bank fall. The late are flooded and much damage is lone to growing crops. A small wash- >ut on the Central road, a short distance west of here, delayed trains Thursday night Near Williarastown, on the tome, Watertown and rail- road, twenty-eight miles north ot this city, the tracks were undermined and .he passenjrer train which left here yes- terday morning was wrecked. No one was hurt Traffic on this end of the road is suspsnded. At Oneida, thirteen miles west of here, eastern part of he village is flooded and people are compelled to leave their houses in boats. The fire alarm was sounded at one o'clock and the villagers were aroused o rescue those in the flooded district Che Ontario'Jc Western railroad tracks are covered with five feet of water and the passenger depot is flooded. Oriskany Falls, twenty-two miles south of here, was flooded by the break- ng of two ponds four miles above the Tillage. No lives were lost, but many >arns. a sawmill and several bridges were swept away. Hop yards wsre flooded, gardens plowed up by water and other damage done. E. B. Miller Ca's woolen mill and Hart Reynolds' cap factory were badly damaged by water. Longley woolen mill also suffered damage. The loss will amount to between and ho drmage throughout Central New will amount to several hundred thousand dollars. The Erie canal over- lowed its banks, but no damage was done. The rainfall for twenty-four lours was '3.62 inches. nrOHAMTOx, N. Y., June se- vere thunder storm and cloudburst de- luged the viilafcs of Lisle and ner's Point a ad the neighboring country Thursday night. The lowlands were submerged and some live-stock perished in the raging waters. The damage in the town cf Triangle is- estimated at The damage ia CortUnd County will probably reach SftO.OOO. B. O. Stock Completed. BALTIMORE, June E. R. Bacon, representing the syndicate which a few days ago bought the shares oi Baltimore Ohio railroad stock from e Baltimore for yes- terday purchased from the State ol Maryland its 'holdings of Baltimore Ohio preferred stock, for which Mr. Ba- con paid over about Later in the day he exchanged tne preferred stock just purchased for shares of B. O. common stock owned by Johns Hopkins University. A Dozen Kentucklanf Drowned. MATSVJOLE, Ky., June 14. The wash out which caused the railroad accideni on the Chesapeake Ohio, in which three trainmen wore killed, also cansec the death oi a dozen persons along Bui creek by drowning. Many persons lef' their homes and fled to the bills, or the loss of life would have been greater The following bodies have been found Miss Bettie Estler, Miss Julia Estter Mrs. Lucy Estler, two sons of Mrs. Est- ler, John Ruggles. Uale Indicted. MOXTKEAU June 14. Eugene Cowles assailant, C. C. Hale, was brought into the Court of Queen's Bench Friday after noon. The grand jury returned a true bill against him for shooting with in tent to kill and murder Hale not guilty. Mr. McGibbin. who aj> peared for tbe prisoner, had the case ad journed until September and fursisbe  door. All wore very much scared, but few were seriously hurt There were about thirty people in tbe car. one started the report that there fif teen people killed anu iu.my more in- jured and all the in towa went to the scene of the 'disaster. Fol- lowing is a list of the people who hurt: W. R. Carver, of Kent. Injnrfed about tbe and abdomen; Miss Ada Fisher, of Miles avenue, bad cut in the back of the head and oyosigiit i'upiired; Mrs. W. S. Westfall, of Bedford, batUy-ahakstt up; Mrs. Joseph Nash ot Kent, head bruised, smashed and injured in- ternally; Mrs. Dr. Matho.va. of severely bruised; Mr. "VV. O. Taylor, ot Bedford, br-iises about the body; KfrflL. Fay, of Bedford, slightly brulsed- WANT DAMAGES. Milling- Coin jut ii T .V mount; for MuvltiK Their Supply of Catr Oft FIXDLAY, 0., Juno 1-t. The Ilarter- Milling Company, of Fostovia, has com- menced suit in the Common lJJU-ao Courts here against the Northwestern Gas Com- pany, of which Charles Foster is presi- dent, but which is really the Standard Oil Company, for damages in the sum of' for tearing up the gas trains supplying the mill wiO fuel. The ing of Lejclxlatlve Brltx-rr. NEW OULEAV. June Some ex- citement has been created in the Legis- lature by the summoning of Senator Foster and other members before the grand jury of East Ifaton Rouge parish. charges of bribery having been taken up by that body. It is believed that the grand jury has entered upon the investigation at the instance of the anti-lottery men. The lottery people say the investigation will result in nothing, as there is nothing to discover. Rotrtod l.r JOSHTJA, Tex., June Three high- waymen. one of whom was masked, rode into Joshua Thursday night and stopped at Mr. store, in which the post- office is located. They were heavily armed and robbed the post-office of all the money it contained, together with what money Mr. Vest bad in the stores The robbers pot pold watches and. 8300 in -money and matte tbcir pc. E. While tbe nsh- inc smack Sea llird was at aachor on tto hanks, twelve northeast of here Thsrsdsv. fen down by tbo trabi fire Jt Obio Friday C C of Itird. e SMsck which officers only CTW was tared by Vt lm i coiporation under which they woro to pay one cent for every barrel of flour manufactured. They claim that because they would not stand an increase on. this contract their supply of gas was. shut off. The mills, which turned out over barrels of flour a day. have not been able to run since Sunday on account of the action of the gaa com- pany. __ New Library Dedicated. Sr'urxoriELD, June 14.-jThe beautiful Warder library, the gift to the citizens of Springfield by Benjamin H. 'Warder, Esq., was dedii-atod Thursday afternoon with interesting ceremonies. It was ex- pected that Governor Campbell would be present and speak, but he fonnd it. impossible to come. The building erected at a cost of S50.000 and bmtt a capacity for over books. The site of the building has a frontage of 10O feet on High street and 150 feet on Spring street. The length of the build- ing is SI feet. Prominent Yoangvtoirn Banker O., June the oldest banker in the city aodlsvnior mcmbor of -the banking Wicfc Bros. Jk Co.. died yesterday icorntnp of stomach trouble. During the past year- he has been in failing and spent tbe past winter in Ure- South, but re- turned home benefited. The de- ceased was born here in lt-24, and bMt been a continuous resident of tbo citfv amassing a large fortune. He U-avrs m. wife and six children. The funerml will be held Sunday afternoon. f- N. S.. Jvn> bcarnjrinp Th'- A- "ri-an Kasny A. S-irhnj- arr- 2 Icrday and Ji XT roar sami ?J of tnmtirr ys.5 -thmt jt _ CSS.-J it ttp- TrrrTJ'ns a N- X s v jr-v T T ,rt. .lytf 1- Tlv 1. tnw_ fcp.; -Itw r ir T" "-.-T __ w-' t rO-. TB _ .in '_________ .in T- m T.. -IK i i j.___r i m ___ -flv tww nr t l-imr t t Jtlpn JWtfto Jfln- MS   

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