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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 9, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               m THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. IL. H. NO. 135. u II the House of tepreaentatives. Effort by tfr. Bland to It Recommitted. ig Debate tbe Measure h by of 135 ta 119. ,TON, June the de- e Silver bill began in the urday morning, Mr. Conger, tbe suggestion of Mr. Pay- nois, modified his substitute ivide that treasury notes is- suance of the bill shall be an gal tender. on then took the floor and le substitute would pass the jbedionce to a public senti- i he believed to be universal a larger use of silver as a al and of a further increase ency of the country. In criti- le treasury bill, he asserted jtically demonetized silvar as ictal, but established a gold ipon the statute books. It i the statute books the only for the coinage of the stand- lollar. He opposed the treas- acause it proposed to treat ly and purely as a morchant- adity. y, of New York, said it was a him that the present Admin- ad not fallen in line for the the people and purchased under existing law. bine, of Nevada, believed in standard, and when he said 1 it in an absolute sense. He that he was in favor of buy- is a commodity and measur- ed. The attitude of the Re- on this question did credit heir heads nor to their hearts of the West bought the high- d products of the East. Every 'publicansof the West helped leans of the East win the bat- .ection; but when the Repub- ie AVest asked the Republic- e East to put silver where it they shrank back as from n thing, and said the AVest :heat them with a scventy- 5ilar. jrson, of Kansas, favored free lage. The only men who urt by the men who ley. It was not an issue be- mocrats and Republicans, ng bill domonetiill silver, Id not and would not vote to silver. ins, of Kansas, said that be for the bill because he recog- act that il the country must cgislation on the silver quoes- >t be had under the provision r reported by the Committee The bill did not moot with al, but he would vote for it knew that in the Senate it imendod. Mississippi, defied gea- the other side who favored fO to come UD and prove their If they did the Democrats the free coinage. ,rley. of that tho was all the legisla- ould be had m the pending It would secure a larger vol- rrcncy, and it would draw the 5 nearer so as ulti- cfive free coinage, anley said that the bill would ry dollar of tbe silver product ted States. T; provided also istant silver wa.s on a parity that very instant there would 1 unlimited coinage of silver, iiust see taat the money pro- ho people must be absolutely finanr-ial wrecks and from tl convulsions and be absolute- 1 secure m the bands of tho on the bill began at three id after disposing- of several nt amendments the question adoption of the substitute >n in caucus, pending which 1 moved to recommit to tbe instructions to report a re bill. The- motion of i nays 140. Tho if-n 1H5. nays i-i-V Renablic- voted with the bill: Anderson, of of Nevada: Carter, of h'-U'-r. of JC.ins.Ts; Uo T-'wn'-'-nd. of C-olo- of and Wilson, of c o SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY. JUNE 9. 1890. TWO CENTS, MILLIOXAIKE VS. PUEACHER the NEWARK. N. J., June local paper recently stated that John D. Peddie, the millionaire trunk manufacturer, was of illegitimate birth. Mr. Peddie not only began a libel suit, but made an investi- gation which disclosed tbe fact that the originator of the storv was Rev. W. Boyd, of the Peddle "Memorial church! story to a reporter, but savs the repor- ter promised not to havo" it published until a later u-ito. Tne editor of the paper, disregarded the report- er's request and published it. Rev. Boyd now says that wuile the publica- tion was premature, the statement is true, and he will stick to it. Mr. Peddie will doubtless sue the min- ister for libel as well as the paper. The matter has caused a great social sensa- tion. It is the sequel of another scandal which has been a m liter of srossip for some time, namely, tho refusal of the trustees of the church to recognize Mr. John Peddie in the charch's affairs. The late ex-mayor and ex-Congressman Thomas B. Peddie founded the church with an endowment of When the church was dedicated recently the keys of the church were presented to the trustees by an adopted daughter of the late Mr. Poddie. There was some surprise that John PedJie was ignored and a family quarrel was hinted at The publication of the statement above re- ferred to followed. Peddie's friends assert that Rev. Boyd is angry at Mr. Peddie for failing to carry out certain supposed intentions of his father in regard to the salary and other incidentals, and that his resentment has led him into making a libelous stafment. TL-J pastor's friends, on the other hand, declare that he is a man who would not say such a thing unless he bad proof of its truth. Mr. Peddie threatens to drive tho min- ister from the puloit, and there are like- ly to be sensational STUUCK A HOCK. Xarrow of an OOP.ill Steamer From Destruction OfT the JrUli Cojst. LO.NDOX, June Tho steamship City of Rome, from Neiy York, arrived at Queenstown Sunday morning in a dam- aged condition anl reported having met with a narrow t-sc.'uo from sinking oil Fastnct light. proceeding slowly in a donbc fog thestiamerstruck arock, bows 011, and the-passengers, alarmed by the shock and tho crash, made a rush for the decks. were met by the oliicers of thu ship, succeeded in al- laying their fears The signal was given to reverse, which the engines promptly obeyed, and the vessel was removed from her perilous petition. Examina- tion of the bov.s was then made and it was found that tbo stem of the ship vras broken and bulwarks stove, but the full extent of the damage she sustained will not be known until the vessel is dry-docked. Several ladies among the passengers were made ill by fright, but, all things the passengers be- havod well The steamer halted only an hour at Qucnnstown and at eleven o'clock steamed for Liverpool at half speed. The passengers passed a resolution praising the conduct of the officers and crew of the ship in their tryin? position and unanimovibly commended the care- fulness of the captain in sailing at greatly reduced at the time of the mishup, though the vessel was many hours overdue and endeavoring to pro- vent the lowering of her record. Rojal Arc mum Supreme Oflirors. Juno election of officers in tho Supreme Council of the Royal Arcanum Saturday resulted: Su- preme Regent. Lsigh R. Watts. mouth, Va.; Supreme Vice Regent; Charles F. Loring, Boston: Supremo Orator, II. II. C. Miller. Chicago: Su- preme Secretary, W, O. Robson, Boston; Supreme E. A. Skinner, Wcstficld. N. Y.: Supreme Chaplain, Charles 0. Spencer. Su- premo Guide. D Wilson. Illinois; Supremo W.ird'-n. Myric'y Amencus. Ga Supreme Sentry. II. LI. Dodd. Fon Du Lac. Wrs. A Gloomy Nr.w oiitromo nf the prc-'-nt tre.uWf P'-CK Martin ar.d labor lnd< fair to force iV'OO v.or-.m-n of rnrnt. The bo.ird .i-iccnu-s d'-iinn1. thai Marv.n aii work-r -n. -.vhi'-Ji -h" firjn Tn.V'-rJ.il .in-J wii'-r" thi'. :i Two Masked Robbers Hold livpress Darin? Crime on the Padflc Eailroad Near -New Salem. a An ExpreM nper'm of If Imt Saves the Money in HU Kasciiln IVpart With Bat SmtM X. D., June through eastbound passenger train on tie Korth- ern Pacific railroad due at Mandan at midnight arrived at one o'clock Sunday morning, the tnail ear presenting a aorry appearance. Two miles west of New Salem and twenty-five west of here, the engineer and fireman were surprised by two masked men climbing over the tender and at the muzzles of big revolvers ordering the train stopped. The summons was obeyed. Express Messenger Argovine, hearing two shots fired forv.ard and suspecting something, hid c-OGO ui money from the Mjf tare, locked the smaller safe, put out the lights and ran back to Kew Salem. The mail car was first tackled by the robbers. Only one mail agent was in the car and he immediately obeyed or- ders by turning over the mail matter. A number of registered were rifled and then the robbers turned their attention to the express car. This they found was deserted, much to their cha- grin, and mistaking the fireman for the express messenger, they ordered him at the points of their pistols to the safes. He protested that he knew noth- ing about it and finally satisfied the robbers. Then the train backed to New Salem and finally came on east. The passe'ngers wero not touched. One passenger put his head out of the window during the delay, but was told to get his head back, and a bullet whizzed past Lis head as a reminder that the orders had batter be obeyed. A posse of armed men vith the sheriff left on a special train for the scene of the daring robbery. Only four masked men were seen at any time and suspic- ions are rife that only two were engaged in the work. AST EMPHATIC PROTEST. Republicans of tliu i u I'lity-thlnl Penn- District Condemn tin; Recent Nomination Mr. Stone for Congress. Pn'iMJUKOii. June 0. About public.m voters of the Twenty-third Congressional district assembled Satur- day night in Carnegie Libraty Hall, Al- legheny. meeting was called for tho purpose of protesting against the action of the recent convention in the alleged nomination of William A. Stone for Congress and to request the county committee to order a new primary elec- tion at which the Republican voters of the district may make a choice of a rep- resentative to succeed Colonel Bayne, who at the convention received the nom- ination and whose immediate declina- tion created a political sensation. The of the evening were John II. Rickctson, John H. Hampton and B. F. Jones. Mr. Hampton was very bitter in his remarks against Hon. T. M. Bayne, denouncing his action and the violation of rule and precedent by the convention in nominating Colonel StoAe as successor. Resolutions wore adopted repudiating and condemning Stone's nomination and demanding that the county executive committee order new primaries and a new convention to fill the vacancy that exists, according to the _ A BA.DJVKECK. Collision Bfltwern Pan-ten eer and Con- struction Trains In Injury to Six DfFTiKi.n, Va., June 9. A collision occurred Saturday six miles west of Natural Tunnel, A. AO. road, between passenger and mixed train Xo. and construction train No. 1. Tho engines were detached and badly smashed, as were also two box cars. About fifty passengers were on board. Following arr the injured: Jolt Fnce, commercial agent, of Bris- tol. injured internally and will tirob- ably die: Cbvrles Carpenter, engineer, log broker.: Frank Surface. Commercial ar'-'-it. of LynchiiU'sf. broken and Mijhtiy N. V. Mil- Ton Tatlon and JoVTih Morris, construe- Tinn "XTC intcmaHj, but ABDUCTOR COWLES SHOT. at Uk Which of CtvntmmA. O., MOSTREAU Que., June 9. About (our o'clock Sunday afternoon carriage con- taining Eugene Cowles. ofClerelaad. wife and his brother-in-law, C. H. Hale, passed rapidly along St. Catherine street. When opposite No. 4 fire sta- tion Cowles pulled a revolver and fired at wife, but missed his aim. The brother-in-law then shot Cowles through the neck. Cowles was taken to the gen- eral hospital. But slight hopes are en- tertained of his recovery. Hale surrendered himself to po- lice and was looted up. Mr. Hale says that the trouble between Cowles and his wile was caused by Cowlos making two tripe to Europe with a woman named King, or Wilson, and who is now at a hotel here, having come from Bufl ilo last Monday. Mrs. Cowles had applied for a divorce on the g.-ound of adultery. Cowles admitted his guilt, but declared that his wife had condoned the offense. Cowles' little daughter Florence, whom he abducted from her home in Cleveland, was placed by Cowles ia the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Mon- treal. An ordor was procured from Judge Duges, to the sisters in charge of the convent, to produce the child, but they refused. The court will issue an, official mandamus to-day, when a guar- dian will be appointed. FOUND WATEHY GKAVES. Mrn Go Flailing .411 but Oue are by dtpsUlag of Their Unnt. June 9. Sunday morning a party of eight young men started for a fishing excursion in a sail boat- When they were about one milo from Thomp- son's Island. in Dorchester Kay, the boat was struck by a squall and' capsized. All but one were swimmers, but instead of trying to swim ashore they tried to clitnb on the boat, which was so heavily bal- lasted that their weight forced her be- neath the surfj.ce, leaving them strug- gling in the watar. In this manner the strength of the men was exhausted and they sank one by one, until but one was left. The survivor, Walter Quinlan, had sunk for the last time when the boat in rising came up under him, lifting him above the surface. He floated in an un- conscious condition for some time, when the boat was seen from the shore by em- ployes of the gas works. These men went out ill a boat, brought Quinlan to shore and resuscitated him. Tna drowned were: Lawrence McTisrnan, aged 24, and John Sullivan, aged 24, of Cbarlestown; Albert Lombard, James Husband, 17: Thomas Troy, IS; Joseph Tufts, IS. all of Boston, and Edgar Ma- loney, of Dorchester. McTiernan leaves a widow and child. The others wero unmarried. LOCKED OUT. Several Hundred of Furniture Factories to Work. .NEW YOHK, June 9. first exten- sive lockout in the furniture cabinet- making trade that has occurred in years was inaugurated Saturday. It is the outcome of a strike in the factory of Alexander Roux Co No. 102 voort street, which was ordered for tho purpose of compelling the firm to dis- charge an obnoxious foreman. The Manufacturers' Association took the matter in hand and after a consultation the members of tho absociation decided to close down. The employes of the various factories were accordingly noti- fied that their services wore no longer required. Several hundred men are thus thrown out. k" Tttlcrt. On'.... -Tun" V. strikcol ar.-i labor- Alleged Yoifx. custom house officers were arrested yesterday for complicity in smuggling. The men arrested are Chief Store Keeper James Latham and his assistant. Archibald Murtagh. No contraband goods were found in their possession. The arrests were made on information obtained through the confession of confederates in former smuggling operations. Other arrests are to follow. Noted Mitilfttcr li Chnrrh. Pint.ATiKi.rirtA. June J. H. Kneist, aged fifty-five, elied last night in his in tho Ktnanuol Lutheran church, tho pait-or.-iii- of -.vhica he re- sifiTif'l tv.-o nft'jr a paralytic stroke, il'- -.vns for yaH paster of ;h-j R-formuA L'Uhoran clinrch in li" was t-r-nidfTit o! the general "-ynod of ihi. cnuroh in i and bad v.-ri'tfn .1 number ol ON THE DIAMOND. tvorks on of Ataoctotlon and Broth- Following are the scores of Saturday's contests: SATIOX.VL T.EAGCE. At Chicago 5, Cleveland S. Second Chicago 1. Cleveland 9. At Pittsburgh Cincin- AatiO. At Brooklyn 4, Phila- delphia 3. Secoud fame Brooklyn 1, Philadel- phia 4. At Xew Boston 3, Xew York 9. LEAGUE. At Buffalo 5, Cleveland 11. At Chicago Pittsburgh 16, Chicago 13. At New Brooklyn 4. New York 8. At Boston 5, Philadel- phia 6. Second Boston 12, Philadelphia AMEK1CAX ASSOCIATION-. At Syracuse 14, Brooklyn eleven innings. At Columbus 9, Louisville 10. At St Toledo 1, St. Louis 9. At Athletics 0, Rochester 0. SUNDAY GAMKS. At St. Toledo S, St. Louis 4. At Athletics 3, Rochester 1. At Columbus 10, Louis- ville 5 thirteen innings. At Syracuse. 5, Brooklyn 9. SATISFACTORY TESTS ou the B. u. mtilntnd of A New Electric Run per How It AV.vsHiXGiosr, June 9. Very satisfac- tory tests of a new railroad electric dan- ger signal were made Saturday on the Baltimore Ohio railroad near Wash- ington. The device, which is to be oper- ated by the Universal Electric Railway Signal Company, of Richmond, Va., con- sists of an electric current formed by a Brush contact underneath the engine with an iron rod laid between the rails. With suitable batteries and telegraph- ic apparatus the engineers of trains coming from the same or opposite di- rections, within a mile or a mile and a half of each other, are notified of the proximity of their trains with unerring certainty, by the ringing of an electric bell: and then as soon as this danger- ous proximity is noted telephonic com- munication through the rail and rod can at once be established and the engineers after stopping- their trains may talk with each other. The tests mide in tho presence of a number of newspaper correspondents, electrical experts and others were high- ly satisfactory and will undoubtedly re- sult in the adoption by the Baltimore Ohio road of a cheap and certain extra precaution against collisions of all kinds. SIX MILLIONS SHORT. Another ia tho Amount Re- quired to 1'iiy W.vsnrxoTox, June It is tained that the second deficiency in the Pension Office will araoun; to about This will not bo appropri- ated at this session, but will be used of the appropriation for the next fiscal year, making the deficiency bill come in next year's appropriation. This deficiency make the ex- penditures of the Pension Office from June 30, 1889, to June 30, 1300, amount to The regular appropria- tion for this fiscal year was In April of this year a deficiency bill of B'21, was passed and this, it seems, was short of enough to carry them to the end of tho fiscal year. Blft Temperance JUemonAtratl n. LONDON, June There were fully participants in the great temper- ance procession Saturday, and the lowest estimates place the number of persons who assembled in Hyde Park at Among the were Michael Dav- Itt, John Burns, tne Socialist leader, and Sir Wilfred Lawson. While leav- ing the park Sir Ilavelock Allen in- curred the ill-will of tbo crowd, who made a rush for him and nearly throw him from his horse. He was finally res- cued by the police. Girlnc Sooth. June A large party of Northern and Eastern capitalists. sixty-six in number, representatives of various financial -and industrial inter- ests of New :md N--w York, ar- rived :v on tb'-ir way south to participate in the con-rnonifi inci- dent to of the new town of T-r.n., in honor of II. I. Ki'r.bal'. Atlanta. Ga.. a hard i -c twenty years for Somr-'s LATEST NEWS HEMS. The Northwestern tilu works at I1L, were destroyed by fire insurance The hot weather haa given the rate in New York City a boom. Ttee deaths last week were 821, againU the preceding week. After a stormy meeting of the York Central Labor Union the SociaSi! merobers withdrew and announced tfctcr intention of forming a senarato xation. Three journeymen bakers. ished and deprived of work by the "11 Prague, committed suicide in ity recently, having been driven deed by their unsuccessful effort tain food. Advices from Rome indicate Archbishop Corrigan, of New York, an almost unbounded the papal court, and is fully upheld ly the Pope in bis course toward' recalci- trant ecclesiastics in America. The French radicals are harshly cfitt- cizing the Duke of Orleans, oa Aft- ground that the penitentiary rules violated in his release. These tions ordain that a prisoner can not pardoned until he has served half tqp time. Emperor William of Germany voting himself assiduously to readout petitions on the labor question. friendly attitude toward the working' people has already caused a division 'Jt the German Liberal party in the Reich- stag. A. W. Einsheimer. George W. man's secretary, says that r. Pullman has never thought of ottering to tota1 worth of World's Fair the fair were located at Pullman. World's Fair directory also denien such a proposition has been m.ide. Cardinal Manning recently celebratat his silver jubilee, the twenty-fifth tvttt- versaty of his elevation to tito digniJj of Archbishop in the Roman hierarchy, he havinc been Archbishop of Westminster oa thedealk of Cardinal Wiseman, in Mrs. George Marshall, a bride of'fens committed suicide at Ala., the other day. by taking She quarreled with her hubb.mi aboutt "the afrangHitient of the furniture in room. Tins, quarrel grieved her so mucK that she locice.l herself up in her room, and took the fatal dose of poison. Suit hus boon brought by the firre. Ramsdell. Sweet Co., of Untfalo, -K. Y., against Lewis B. er book-keeper, for li their complaint "the firm state thai White, between May and October 1S88, got away with of the money. Whito'b whereabouts are ut- known. i t" if 11? 4 P. j J 13 Mnrdurod by Cattle CilCVJi.v.N-F., Wyo., James Bab- ton and AVilliam Johnson, cattlemtt who have been active in the campaiift against cattle thieves, wore ambushtfi yesterday by George McDonald companion named Sinscum, the leadens of the cattle thieves. Barton at tho-fk-itJlre. Johnson escaped uaiz.- jured The murdeacrs are being put- sued by a posse. THE MARKETS. Flour. Grnlu and 1'rovlsloti. XEW YOHK, June 7 Closscl at yiKr cent Exchange steady. ra'.cs ac- tuul rates for sixty clijs sip.il maud G'lvernmcut bonds stcas'y. Cusreccy r.i LK, Is, coupon, ut 4fjs do at 103. CLEVELAND, .Tune Ceuntrr rnaat nt Mlnnc-'Ot.i patent at Minnesota spring ;it J.i No. 2 red at 
                            

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